Category Archives: Fashion

Caring about homeless pets – always in style! Today! Sat., April 22! 🌼Now until 2 p.m.🌺💙 The WARL kitten🐯🐱 shower!💕

20161225_114857-1
Rose’s Cece was so tiny not so long ago! She’s a big girl now! The vet said kittens gain one pound per month as they grow into adulthood! pics: R.T.

Cece was a rescue! Here’s Miss Cece💛, this morn, all feisty and cute!🌺:

20170422_102144

20170422_102207
Adorable, spoiled grrrl!💙💜💛💛💜💙

At today’s WARL KITTEN SHOWER …

… You can cuddle some kittens who will need homes soon! Volunteer to foster-parent a litter – or 2!?!!

In a few weeks WARL will be inundated with kittens! The staff call the kitty tsunami KITTEN SEASON; there are lots of people who STILL DON’T GET IT and do not spay their female cats. The result?  Hundreds of kittens who need loving forever homes. Millions end up in animal shelters. Thousands are “put  down” annually.

At WARL, a no-kill animal shelter, the staff diligently works to meet the kittens’ – babies! – special needs. Dry kitten food, pate cat food,  liquid kitten formula, little toys … all unique to lil’ kitties.

Admission to the WARL kitten shower is a kitty donation!💙💙💜💛

WARL ASKS YOU FOR THE FOLLOWING GIFTS:

🐯 Canned PATE cat food!

🐺 Non-clumping clay litter

🐱 DRY KITTEN food

🐯 TOY MICE!

Visit this a.m. or afternoon!

They are located at 139 Holden St, Worcester.

Their phone #: 508-853-0030

Their website: https://worcesterarl.org

Their hours:

Saturday 12–4PM
Sunday 12–4PM
Monday 12–4PM
Tuesday 12–4PM
Wednesday 12–4PM
Thursday 12–4PM
Friday 12–4PM

– R.T.

Worcester news you can use – always in style!

flier MPS(1)

PRESS CONFERENCE

Monday, April 24 – 6:30 p.m.

LOCATION: OUR LADY OF MT. CARMEL CHURCH
24 Mulberry St., Worcester

RAIN OR SHINE

OUR LADY OF MOUNT CARMEL CHURCH, WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, USA, WAS UNJUSTLY CLOSED BY THE CHURCH LEADERSHIP ON MAY 1ST, 2016

The church was neglected by the Diocese of Worcester, which had a fiduciary responsibility to assure its maintenance, knowing that viable solutions to repair and sustain it are available and at hand.

It is scheduled for demolition in May 2017.

Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church is a community anchor, an iconic, irreplaceable historically significant cultural center, as well as a centerpiece for Worcester’s large Italian American population.

It was also awarded the distinction as one of the top seven historic resources in Massachusetts.

The Mount Carmel Preservation Society is working diligently to save Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church. It is unjust to see this historical treasure demolished unnecessarily.

Your support in any way, be it in-kind service or donation would be greatly appreciated.

Thank You!

Mount Carmel Preservation Society contact@preserveourladyofmountcarmel.org

********

linked_image(1)

linked_image(4)

Fire Works Studio will be opening their doors to the public:

Friday, May 12 – 4 pm – 8 pm

Saturday, May 13 – 10 am – 6 pm

Come chat with artists…

see demonstrations…

purchase unique pieces!

Find the perfect Mother’s Day gift among the mugs, bowls and potted plants. Various other artists will be set up in the lobby.

linked_image(2)

linked_image(5)

The Fire Works Studio
38 Harlow St., Worcester

*******

iStock_000006516808_locke_rd

Just a Reminder to All our Interested Agencies/Organizations — We Need Your Forms:

Our upcoming “Day of Hope” event on June 10th at University (Crystal Park), Main South

This event is the beginning of a long-lasting momentum that has the power to transform people’s lives, inspire compassion and service and bring people and organizations together like never before.

This community event, previously known as Worcester Convoy of Hope, is a collaborative effort to bring hope to Worcester County through FREE groceries, health screenings, job and career services, family portraits, haircuts, prayer, “Kids Carnival”, community services and entertainment.

This all-volunteer event mobilizes residents to serve and make a difference in their community.

Strong participation by local businesses, churches,community agencies, and individuals is crucial to the success of this event.

Through this collaborative effort we do together what no one could do alone.

This year Hope for Worcester seeks to mobilize 1,000 volunteers and honor 5,000 guests.

We look forward to partnering with you to provide our guests with the quality services/information you graciously supply every day.

The Community Services tent will allow for Hope for Worcester to host 40 organizations and the Health Services tent will allow for Hope For Worcester to host 16 organizations. In an effort to bring the best service providers to our honored guests your organization/company is formally invited to fill one of these spots.

This event will be held on
Saturday, June 10th in Crystal Park (University Park) across from Clark University, from 11 am to 4 pm.

Hope for Worcester schedule for the day:

Agency/Company representative arrives for set up: 9:30am
Set up complete by 10am
Doors open at 10am
Event wrap up/agency clean-up of booth site: 4pm

There is no registration fee to participate, but all donations are welcome and tax deductible.

We hope your participation will have a positive impact on your current and future efforts to serve our community.

We look forward to having you, please contact me with any questions…

Brittany Brown, MS, RN
Community & Health Services Leader
Hope for Worcester
www.hopeforworcester.org

*******

20170405_160034
pic: R.T.

Attention Families!

You and your children are invited to Worcester Family Partnership’s 8th Annual…

FREE HEALTH & SAFETY FAIR

BIGGER and BETTER than ever!

Wednesday, April 26 – 3:30 to 6:30 pm

AT THE YWCA – One Salem Square

RAFFLES and PRIZES

SUMMER PROGRAM INFORMATION

FREE FOOD and DRINKS

HEALTH SCREENINGS

CAR SEAT SAFETY

BIKE SAFETY with HELMET GIVE-A-WAY
(Both parent and child must be present for fitting)

A visit from UMass Memorial Ronald McDonald Care Mobile, a WFD firetruck, police car and more!

Tonight! Abby’s House Spring-Tacular!🌺🌻🌼🌷

Parlee and Athena 2
Parlee (left), Abby’s housing advocate, will be at Holy Cross tonight.

IMG_20170419_184358340-1
The Abby’s House event also features Dorrie, proud mum of just rescued Peggy Sue. Here’s Peg resting – a few hours earlier she had a tooth extracted at the vet’s.😢 pic: D.M.

The annual Abby’s House Spring-Tacular fundraiser, a food and beverage tasting event, will take place TODAY – Thursday, April 20 – from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the College of the Holy Cross’ Hogan Campus Center.

The event will feature:

14 tasting stations🍤🍷

jewelry sales💍💎💍💖

surprise Buy-A-Bed boxes💕

and a silent auction.💋

The cost is $65 per person.

Money raised will help to support Abby’s overnight shelter, affordable housing programs, and advocacy for homeless women and their children.💙💜💛

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit http://www.abbyshouse.org/spring-tacular or contact Justina at Abby’s House at (508) 756-5486 Ext. 14.

The Boys and Girls Club of Worcester – feeding our kids!💛

Childhood Hunger Rate in Worcester Higher than the National Average

The Boys & Girls Club of Worcester Serves Kids a FREE Dinner 5 Nights a Week

linked_image(3)
Steve “Tank” Tankinow, the Kid’s Café Director💜💙💛

We don’t need to search very far for statistics on childhood hunger:

1 in 4 kids goes to bed hungry in Worcester.

That’s higher than the national average of 1 in 5.

Childhood hunger is linked to lasting effects on our kids’ social development, physical health, and academic performance.

In fact, 93% of educators are concerned about the long-term damage hunger can have on our youth.

When children are hungry:

88% are unable to concentrate in school

87% struggle with lack of energy or motivation

65% exhibit behavioral problems

84% have overall poor academic performance

Often times, the foods they have access to pose no nutritional value.

80% of our Club members live at or below the poverty level, limiting their exposure to fresh, healthy foods. The financial limitations on our families force parents to serve fast food or processed and packaged meals.

Our Club is the only place in the city where kids can receive a FREE, nutritious dinner 5 days a week.

Kid’s Café provides approximately 300 youth a day with nutritious meals.

Steve “Tank” Tankinow, our Kid’s Café Director, has been cooking home-style meals for our members for over 17 years, dedicating himself to serving the hungry children in Worcester.

linked_image(2)
Eating good food at the Club💜💛

If you’re interested in helping our Club provide dinner 5 nights a week for our kids, please consider making a donation!

How it all Began:

Tank’s Story:

“I’ve been a member of the Boys & Girls Club since I was a kid. To me, it was a safe place. I always felt at home. When I came back as an adult, the sounds and even the smells were the same as I remembered as a kid.

I was inspired to start Kid’s Café as a way of giving back to the community. Because my career has been involved in nutrition, I wanted to do something that provided good, healthy food for kids. I worked with the Worcester County Food Bank and the Boys & Girls Club, and formed a non-profit organization. We started by making supper for a handful of kids 17 years ago; now we feed about 300 kids a hot, nutritious meal 2 days a week (3 days a week we are provided meals through the Federal Government). We’re helping keep kids healthy. It’s an important part of the mission of the Boys & Girls Club.

I’ve been fortunate that so many people have volunteered to help, or responded when I called. We’ve had everyone from executives to high school students contributing food or money to buy food. They pitch in as teams to cook and serve. It’s a lot of work to feed 300 kids, but with the community support we always get it done.”- Steven “Tank” Tankinow (excerpt from alumni profile in 2011 annual report)

Fallon Health Opens Food Pantry at Our Club

We’re thrilled to provide our kids with nutritious food while at the Club, but we also want to ensure their health at home.

Fallon Health has opened a food pantry at our Harrington Clubhouse to help our organization further fight childhood hunger.

This crucial addition to our case management department will provide Club families with food and resources during tough times and emergencies such as a death in the family or unemployment.

Several Fallon Health employees volunteered their time to set up the pantry and stock the new shelves with non-perishable items such as canned vegetables, pasta, and cereal.

The pantry will be restocked throughout the year to ensure we can continue assisting our families. The generosity of Fallon Health has enabled our staff to help our families in a new and pivotal capacity.

If you’re interested in donating to our food pantry, please contact Liz Hamilton, Executive Director, at:

Boys & Girls Club of Worcester
65 Tainter Street, Worcester, MA, 01610-2520, United States
www.bgcworcester.org

linked_image(4)

Ringling – never in style!!! It’s here – BOYCOTT THIS WILD ANIMAL-ABUSING “SHOW” ONE LAST TIME!!!!

The elephants and tigers won! No more Ringling! The final gurgle this weekend…BOYCOTT THE ANIMAL ABUSE! Fuck the nostalgia BS! Stay away! Better yet! Lead a Protest at DCU!

We repost this classic InCity Times cover story written by ICT super scribe Steve Baer. It was written early in the fight for the animals, when we first began to educate you all, when we dreamed for the end and, along with so many regular folks across America, WORKED TO SHUT DOWN ALL CIRCUSES THAT USE WILD ANIMALS!

– Rose T.

HelpMeAntiCircus

Elephants and Circuses

By Steve Baer

In June 2000, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the Animal Welfare Institute, The Fund for Animals, the Animal Protection Institute, and Tom Rider, a former employee of Ringling Brothers, filed a lawsuit against Ringling Brothers in Federal District court under the Endangered Species Act.

The lawsuit charges that the circus uses a stick with a sharpened metal hook on the end (called a “bullhook” or “ankus”) to repeatedly beat, pull, push, torment and threaten elephants. This type of aggression should be illegal, and is, but only because the recipients of the beatings were highly endangered Asian Elephants. Other animals in the circus, unfortunately, are not given the same level of protection. The intention of the lawsuit was to immediately stop Ringling’s inhumane mistreatment of animals in the circus.

It wasn’t, however, until October 2006, a year after a September 2005 court order by a Federal District judge who announced that he will incarcerate Ringling’s lawyers and executives if they do not turn over critical veterinary documents that Ringling disclosed their internal veterinary records. The records revealed Ringling Brothers severe abuse of the elephants.“[We] hope the spotlight continues to shine on the use of inhumane chains and bullhooks and Ringling’s cruel behind-the-scenes treatment of elephants,” said Nicole Paquette, G e n e r a l C o u n s e l a n d Director of L e g a l Affairs at the Animal Protection Institute.

“ T h e Court has run out of patience for R i n g l i n g Bro t h e r s ’ s t a l l i n g ploys,” added M i c h a e l Markarian, president of The Fund for A n i m a l s . ” This trial will come not a moment too soon, as R i n g l i n g ’s e l e p h a n t s continue to suffer every day from abusive discipline and prolonged chaining.”

RBB-SaddestShow-3

Training

Elephants are not domestic pets. They are wild animals. The same is true of lions, tigers, and bears. To be trained for the circus, an elephant had to have been chained down and had the spirit repeatedly beaten out of him or her by a team of “animal trainers.” The “trainers” use baseball bats, metal pipes, ax handles, metal prods, and sticks. The intention of the “trainers” is to show the elephant who is boss. The elephant, being an emotionally sensitive creature, as well as having a sensitive skin, is known to cry during such sessions. The torment, which doesn’t end for days, leaves behind a mere shell of the former animal. The elephant suffers emotional scars, and often physical scars too.

One “trainer” for a major circus was caught on under cover video saying “You’ve got to make them scream – You’ve got to make them cry!” in reference to how to make an elephant ready for performing in a circus.

According to Henry Ringling North in his book “The Circus Kings,” the big cats are “chained to their pedestals, and ropes are put around their necks to choke them down.” Writes Mr. Ringling North, “They work from fear.” Bears may have their noses broken while being trained to “teach” them to respond to commands, and their paws burned to force them to stand on their hind legs.

Once animals have learned to feel helplessness and have become spiritually drained, they are kept in a state of submission through various mechanisms.

PETA_One-Direction-Ad_BW72-2

Animals, such as bears, may be forced into tight fitting muzzles so they will remain subdued and discouraged from protecting themselves. The muzzles interfere with vision and respiration. Similarly, tight collars are employed to make animals more manageable. Others have their teeth removed. Chimpanzees and bears reportedly had their teeth knocked out by a hammer. Animals are declawed, defanged, and/or tranquilized to maintain control over them.

Elephants are forced to perform tricks by being hit with the ankus and electric prods. The ankus has a long handle with a sharp metal hook. It is jabbed into the most sensitive parts of an elephant’s body – under the trunk, behind the ears, around the eyes, inside their mouth, behind the knees, and in the genital region. Elephants are kept in fear, so they can be easily controlled by the circus.

Frequently an elephant will sustain an injury while being forced to perform an unnatural movement, such as balancing on two feet on a stool. Undercover investigators as recently as July 2006, have videotaped trainers beating elephants. Ringling’s own “Animal Behaviorist” in a January 2005 e-mail, recounted to Ringling’s General Manager that she saw an elephant named Lutzi “dripping blood all over the arena floor during the show from being hooked” after a handler “hook[ed] Lutzi under the trunk three times and behind the leg once in an attempt to line her up for the Tmount.” (A “T-mount” is a stunt where two elephants and at least one person stand on the back of a kneeling elephant.)

An elephant cannot always carry his or her weight on two legs, so a torn ligament is not uncommon. If the injuries are left untreated, it can be disastrous for the elephant.

Make no mistake about it, the whips, tight collars, muzzles, electric prods, bull-hooks, and other enslavement tools used during circus acts and training sessions are reminders to you, and to the animals, that they are being forced to perform. Animals do not naturally ride bicycles, stand on their heads, or jump through rings of fire. In contrast to the exciting public relations hype associated with circuses, animals in the circus live a dismal life of domination, confinement, and violent training.

slave-trade-circus-psa-page-001

On The Road

Most circus animals usually live and travel in small, barren transport cages. Their cages are often so small that it is difficult for the animals to turn around. The animals are hauled around the country in poorly ventilated trailers and boxcars for up to 50 weeks a year in all kinds of extreme weather conditions. Animals defecate, urinate, eat, drink and sleep in the same small cramped cages. Access to the basic necessities of food, water, and veterinary care is often inadequate. Tigers and lions who naturally secure a territory of 75 to 2,000 square miles are often forced to live and travel in cages only 4 feet wide by 6 feet long by 5 feet tall.

Circus animals who are not confined to cages may often be chained or tethered almost the whole day. Most circuses routinely chain their elephants, while ungulates such as camels, zebras, and horses are tethered or stalled.

Under sworn testimony to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, witnesses and former circus employees have reported that elephants are normally chained by one front leg and one rear leg. Chains are usually, although not always, long enough to permit the elephant to take a step or two forward or backwards, and to lie down. Elephants are also kept chained in enclosed boxcars where they stand in their own excrement and urine for days unable to move around, smell fresh air, or find intellectual stimulation. Reportedly, circus elephants are confined in this way for 20 or more hours each day. The prolonged standing in wet, unsanitary conditions can lead to physical problems – such as arthritis and life threatening foot problems (foot rot, cracked nails, and infected cuticles) – and psychological problems. In the wild, elephants travel tens of miles each day. The inadequate exercise that elephants enslaved by the circus experience contributes to their decline in health.

In sworn testimony, Tom Rider, a former Ringling Brothers elephant barn-keeper stated, “After three years of working with elephants in the circus, I can tell you that they live in confinement and they are beaten all the time when they don’t perform properly.”

Other former Ringling Brothers employees have spoken out against behind-the-scenes animal cruelty. Former Ringling performer Kelly Tansy commented, “On my very first day with the circus, I witnessed animal cruelty. I saw an elephant being beaten in what appeared to be a disciplinary action. The beating was so severe that the elephant screamed. I have come to realize, through all the circuses that I have worked for, that mistreatment of animals is a standard part of training and is thought to be a ‘necessary’ part of exhibiting them. Additionally, Tansy reports, “I have seen chimps locked in small cages constantly when not performing; elephants chained continuously; and even animals being beaten during performances.”

Animal Psychology

The continual frustration of wild animals who are unable to engage in their instinctive behaviors can lead the animals to some serious psychological problems. Stereotypic actions such as hyper-aggression, apathy, selfmutilation, bar-biting, and pacing are indicative of psychological maladies. Frustrated by the lack of ability to move elephants repeatedly bob their heads and sway back and forth; some repeatedly rattle their chains with their trunks. Both of these actions are signs of neurotic behavior. Animals in the circus are often deprived of food and water to induce them to perform, as well as to prevent untimely defecation while they are in public view.

Even if it was possible to supply circus animals with all their material wants, something vital would still be lacking. What’s lacking is the joy that is associated with simply having the ability to evade being forced to do something.

Under natural conditions, in the wild, elephants have a life span of about 60 years. Elephants are normally migratory, traveling over 4,000 miles a year. Elephants have poor eyesight, but all of their other senses—hearing, smell, taste, and touch—are acute. Their trunk is frequently at work picking up scents of food and danger from the ground and air. Elephants can smell water at great distances and can hear certain sounds more than a mile away. Elephants in the wild dine on a wealth of plant parts—leaves, twigs, bark, shoots, fruit, flowers, roots, tubers, and bulbs.

elephants in nature

Female elephants are among the few mammals, including humans, that live beyond their reproductive years. The typical cow will end her reproductive years at around 45 years old. During this post-reproductive period between 45 and 60 plus years, she assists in the care of the young of other elephants.

Elephants display complex, highly social behavior, living in tightly knit families headed by the oldest females. These elephants remain together for life. The family also defends the young, sick, old, and disabled from predators. Elephants are highly emotional individuals. They express joy, pleasure, and compassion, as well as sadness and grief. Wild elephants have been known to celebrate births of new elephants and to grieve and even shed tears over the death of a family member.

It is a shame and a travesty of morality that for the sake our children’s and our own momentary entertainment we encourage so much distress to come to pass on the families and the young of elephants.

What are we teaching children?

ImogenBailey

Circuses use animals to appeal to children and the child nature in adults. Observing animals at the circus, however, teaches children nothing about the natural behaviors of other species. They may learn about the size, shape and color of the animals, but behavior patterns, social interactions, intelligence, hunting instinct, maternal care giving, food gathering and movement patterns are absent. Instead, children are presented with images of either ferocious or stupid animals, whose seemingly only purpose is to amuse humans. The child unconsciously takes home from the circus the feeling that it is acceptable to exploit another being… animal or human.

Dr. Michael W. Fox, a veterinarian, animal behaviorist, and former professor of psychology reveals that “Parents have told [him] that they do not take their children to the circus where there are performing animals because they know intuitively, empathically, that it is wrong.”

Dr. Fox acknowledges that exposing children to “covert animal cruelty and overt domination, control, and exploitation teaches children that it is culturally acceptable, and the norm, to subjugate other sentient beings [humans included] and make them perform unnatural acts.” According to Dr. Fox, “The child’s nascent capacity to empathize with other living beings is certainly… crippled.” Dr. Fox asserts that “To expose and subject sensitive and impressionable children to the wild animal-abusing circus is child abuse.”

Tuberculosis

Protect yourself. A deadly and highly contagious human strain of tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis or TB) is infecting and killing captive elephants. TB is an airborne disease that spreads through tiny droplets in the air.

According to Dr. John Lewis of the International Zoo Veterinary Group, “[I]f tuberculosis is diagnosed in an elephant there are clear public health implications as the disease can be spread by close contact with infected animals [and] people.” Circuses routinely allow members of the public to feed, pet, and ride elephants.

TB is difficult to identify in elephants. Elephants are too large to be x-rayed, skin tests are unreliable, and trunk wash cultures only indicate whether the elephant has active TB. Circuses may also intentionally mislabel trunk wash specimens from infected animals using a TBnegative animal as the donor. No test can determine if an elephant is harboring a TB infection. Infected elephants may exhibit no symptoms of TB or may suffer from chronic weight loss, diminished appetite, chronic nasal discharge, coughing, and intolerance to exercise.

An extremely thin elephant, Lota, was diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1996. A photo taken in May 2001 shows a child petting her at a circus. A few months later, this elephant was taken off the road and again given tuberculosis treatment

Most circuses have been cited by the USDA for failure to comply with TB testing requirements for elephants and handlers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has determined that USDA veterinary medical officers and animal care inspectors who conduct elephant inspections may be at risk for TB infection.

Contingency Plans

Two police officers, one a fairly regular looking 5-feet 5-inch tall man and the other a very muscular 6-feet 4- inch tall man, were covering a detail at a circus near Worcester. They were asked by a citizen of the town “If one of the [three] elephants rampage what are you prepared to do.” The shorter police officer motions toward the larger police officer and replies, “I’ll hide behind him!” In truth there isn’t much more most people could do. Once a stressed out elephant rebels against a trainer’s physical dominance, the rampage is nearly impossible to stop without lethal force. In the event that an elephant runs amok, circus personnel cannot protect themselves, nor can they protect the general public.

An elephant who went berserk in Florida in 1992 with five children on her back was shot with more than 50 rounds of ammunition before an officer was located who happened to have armor-piercing bullets specially designed by the military to penetrate steel.Would you want your child on the back of an elephant that is being shot at?

In 1994, a stressed out circus elephant name Tyke could not take the abuse any longer. Her deadly rampage lasted an hour in downtown Honolulu. Department-issued semi-automatic pistols were useless. A zoo veterinarian’s lethal injections had no effect. The police finally located a high-powered counter-sniper rifle and fired three rounds into her heart. Tyke died after having been shot 87 times.

Where Are the Regulating Bodies?

The only federal law regulating the treatment of most wild animals in circuses is the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). The AWA is inadequate and is inconsistently enforced. Circuses that do not comply with the Act are often given several opportunities to remedy violations. The USDA, itself determined that they “cannot ensure the humane care and treatment of animals as required by the AWA.”

According to Dr. Peggy Larson, a former USDA inspector and a veterinarian, “Circus animals are poorly inspected under the USDA Animal Welfare Act.” Dr. Larson stated that USDA veterinarians, who concern themselves primarily with housing and husbandry, do not know how to diagnose diseases in wild animals. And since neither a large animal practitioner nor a small animal veterinarian is equipped to handle elephants or big cats, circus animals are often not treated when they need care. Dr. Larson concluded, “USDA compliance is at best hopelessly ineffective.”

It can not be overstated that the vigilance and help of the public is essential when it comes to identifying and reporting circus animal abuse. If it were not for the help of concerned and compassionate people the truth about Ringling Brothers Circus cruelty and other circuses would still be well hidden and left unchecked.

Many uniformed people see elephants and other circus animals as being something of an American cultural tradition. Often, though, after becoming informed that no circus can possibly provide the right environment or proper care for such creatures, people find it unconscionable to allow an animal circus into town. Over 50 municipalities across the US, from Marin County CA to Weymouth MA prohibit circuses from operating in their community if they have elephants or other wild animals.

Ringling Brothers Circus – The Cruelest Show On Earth Industry Leader

Of all the animal circuses, Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus is the most diabolical and manipulative, not only to the animals, but also to the public.

Ringling Bros. public relations department has been working overtime to deceive the public into believing that animals imprisoned in the circus are “treated like family.” But no amount of misleading propaganda can sanitize the circus’s horrific record of animal neglect and their sabotage of the work of animal advocacy groups.

Since 1993, Ringling Brothers has been cited for more than one hundred deficiencies in animal care during inspections conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The circus has consistently opposed legislation and regulations to improve the conditions of captive wildlife. In California, for example, Ringling Bros. opposed legislation to limit the time an elephant may be confined in chains in a 24-hour period. Ringling Brothers has been investigated by the USDA as a result of allegations of cruelty to animals made by former circus workers, one of whom testified before Congress about his experiences with the circus. Since late 1998, three former Ringling Brothers employees have stated that the circus’s elephants, including the babies, receive regular beatings. The Ringling Bros. circus has been sued by two animal protection organizations for conducting illegal spying operations.To settle one case out of court, Ringling Bros. agreed to turn over custody of older animals.

Ringling Brothers Circus failed to protect a 4-year old Bengal tiger from being shot to death while he was in his cage; killed a 3-year old elephant through neglect and tried to hide the body; forcibly separated two baby elephants from their mothers by dragging the babies away with rope, resulting in rope burn wounds on the rear legs of the babies; overworked a 15-year old horse to the point of exhaustion and death; drowned a 4-year old elephant; tried to cover-up the death of a 2-year-old lion that dehydrated in a circus train that was traveling with no water break across California’s Mojave Desert on an overly hot day; euthanized an 8-month old elephant who fell from a pedestal breaking his legs that were bound together during training; caused a wild caught sea lion to die in her transport container, and failed to provide adequate ventilation for their tigers resulting in one tiger injuring his eye and breaking his tooth as he attempted to tear open a cage door and escape from the dangerously high temperatures of the trailer.

But the crimes that Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus commits extend beyond nonhuman animals. Ken Feld, CEO of Ringling Brothers Circus has been caught performing illegal wiretaps on the public, hiring ex-CIA people to illegally monitor and interfere in peoples’ lives, manipulating public sentiment against animal protection organizations, and using lobbyists and lawyers to defeat legislation which was designed to protect people from harm. Proof of this information is found in “Smith vs. Feld, civil action case number 98-357-A.

In that document Clair E. George, former Central Intelligence Agency deputy director for covert operations states that “Feld had set up a special unit, much like the Watergate ‘plumbers,’ to destroy anyone who threatened the image of the circus as wholesome fun-for-the-whole-family, conscientious custodian of animals. Feld’s main target was People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).”

Ringling-Shut-Down-PETA-768x668

PETA had circulated USDA reports that described horrible conditions at Ringling Brothers circus’s Center for Elephant Conservation in Polk City, Fla. At the Center USDA inspectors found two tightly chained baby elephants with lesions and scars on their legs, evidently caused by constant friction with their restraints. When USDA inspectors asked about the injuries, the elephant handlers told the inspectors that baby elephants were “routinely” chained to forcibly separate them “from their mothers.” The handlers angrily tried to block the inspectors from taking pictures. It was also discovered that about half of the elephants in Ringling Brothers Circus shows in Florida had a form of tuberculosis that was transmittable to human beings.

Animal-Free Circuses

Not all circuses use animals. Good circuses dazzle their audiences solely with skilled human performers who are so talented at their art that they don’t need to enslave animals. Some animalfree circuses that have grown in popularity include Cirque du Soleil, Circus Smirkus, Circus Chimera, Circus Millennia, Cirque Eloize, Circus Oz, The New Pickle Family Circus, and Bindlestiff Family Circus. These animal-free circuses make it possible for families to have fun without causing animal suffering.

The number of cities and towns that are banning the use of animals in circuses is growing. People in many communities are realizing that wild animals don’t belong in the circus because of harm to the animals and the inherent risk to public safety.

You Can Help

Every individual has the power to limit and even stop the use of animals in circuses. Educate others. Most people would not support the circus if they saw animal trainers beating elephants mercilessly with razor sharp bullhooks behind the scenes or knew that tigers were kept in cages only 4’ x 5’ for the majority of their lives. Talk to friends, family, and neighbors about the cruel treatment animals endure under the big top. Encourage them to join you in taking a stand against animal circuses. You can also write letters to urge industry leaders and circus sponsors to avoid bringing animal circuses into town; ask your town to ban live animal acts; encourage legislators to support legislation to end exotic animal acts; request enforcement of animal welfare regulations; and report any perceived violations of state and local animal protection laws to the police and animal control.

If you are interested in helping to stop animal circuses from coming into Massachusetts please contact the Animal Protection Institute at 1-800- 348-7387, or go to www.api4animals.org or www.morebeautifulwild.com

baby-elephants-in-barn

Four Fast Facts about Animals in the Circus

1. Every major circus that uses animals has been cited for violating the minimal standards of care set forth in the United States Animal Welfare Act (AWA).

2. Animals born in circus “conservation” breeding programs have never been released into the wild.

3. From 1994 to 2005, at least 31 elephants died premature deaths in the circus.

4. Captive elephant and captive feline attacks on humans in the U.S. have resulted in hundreds of injuries, many resulting in death.

Baking your own Easter bread – always in style!🌷

ICT_Yum Yums-edited
Here’s an Easter bread recipe from Chef Joey’s Greek and Italian family💗 …

EASTER BREAD!🌷🌷🌷🌷🌷🌷

Photos, recipe and text by Chef Joey

IMG_5510-1

That wonderful spring holiday, Easter, is upon us and, as with holidays, food is involved. Main courses vary for Easter, as it is the end of Lent, but meat is usually at the top of the menu. Depending on your heritage, Easter lamb is right up there, but there is one staple food that is widely known and on just about everyone’s table: Easter Bread.

In many European countries, many traditions exist with the use of bread during Easter. Traditionally, the Easter bread is sweetened. I was curious to learn that “Communion” bread traces its origin back to Byzantium and the Orthodox Christian church. However, the recipe for sweeter bread – sweetened with honey – dates as far back to the Homeric Greek period! Many classical texts mention a “honey-bread.” It is also widely known that sweetened bread desserts similar to today’s panettone, were always a Roman favorite.

The Easter holiday is one where “sweet” bread brings itself into the symbolic realm.

The Sweeter breads indicate Easter Sunday and the rising of Christ.

Although bread is significant for religious purposes, it is also symbolic of life. A peasant proverb: “Chie hat pane mai non morit” — “One who has bread never dies.”

Throughout history there have been many shapes of Easter breads. One usually contained two points and an egg covered with a cross. The egg and the points that recall birds in flight speak of fertility, sexuality and procreation — basic themes in Easter and its pagan origins. This was most likely the influence of today’s braided bread.

The second bread was designed to have no general shape, but was rather baked to encircle an egg, with the initials BP put on it. The initials BP stand for Buona Pasquaor – “Happy Easter.”

IMG_5511-1

Babka is a Polish bread also made at Easter. Babka typically is tall and cylindrical, like panetonne. It frequently contains raisins, may be iced on top and is sweet.

Here is a simple, basic Easter bread recipe. You can adjust the sweetness. It is extremely delicious on a Monday morning toasted with butter – just sayin’! It is a basic sweet bread recipe my Greek and Italian family used with a few modern touches. You can place colored, pre-cooked hard boiled eggs in your braid, and there is no limit, usually one egg per household member was incorporated into the bread.

FYI: My Greek family used to boil the eggs in red onion skins to color them; the Italians used red wine instead of water. Try 4 cups of blueberries in water and boil your Easter eggs for lavender! Curry for yellow – the list goes on!💗💚💗💚💚💗

20170408_103920-1-1
pic: R.T.

Ingredients:🌸🌸🌸

1/2 cup whole milk

10 tablespoons sugar, divided

1 1/4 envelope active dry yeast

4 large eggs, room temperature

6 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup (2 stick) unsalted butter, cut into 1″ pieces, room temperature, plus 1/2 tablespoon, melted

Heat milk in a small saucepan over medium heat or in a microwave until an instant-read thermometer registers no more than 110°F.

Transfer milk to a bowl; stir in 1 tablespoon sugar.

Sprinkle yeast over milk and whisk to blend.

If the milk is too hot, it will kill the yeast. Let sit until foamy, about 5 minutes.

Add eggs and whisk until smooth.

Combine remaining sugar, flour and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook.

Add milk to mixture. With mixer running, add the room-temperature butter, 1 piece at a time, blending well between additions.

Mix on medium speed for 1 minute.

Knead on medium-high speed until dough is soft and silky, about 5 minutes.

If kneading by hand, have the flour in a separate bowl and add the milk mixture and butter so it incorporates.

Take a bowl double the size of the dough and wipe the inside with some melted butter.

Place dough in bowl. Brush top of dough with remaining melted butter; cover with plastic wrap.

Let dough rise in a warm, draft-free area until doubled in size, 1 – 1 1/2 hours.

Punch down the dough and divide it into 2 equal pieces.

Then divide each piece into 3 equal pieces.

Dust your hands with flour and roll out to about a foot a half (18”). Place on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.

Arrange ropes side by side lengthwise on prepared sheet.

Pinch top ends together. Braid dough. Pinch bottom ends together to secure (braided loaf will be about 12″ long).

If adding hard boiled eggs, tuck them between braids, spacing evenly. Loosely cover with plastic wrap or a kitchen towel. Let rise in a warm, draft-free area until puffed but not doubled in size, 45-50 minutes.

Arrange a rack in middle of oven; preheat to 375°F.

Whisk remaining egg with 2 teaspoons warm water in a small bowl.

Avoiding dyed eggs, brush dough all over with egg wash. Bake until bread is golden usually about 20 – 25 minutes and a thermometer inserted into center of loaf reads 190°F.

Cool on a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.🎷🎷

Happy Easter!🐰🐰🐰🐰

******

PRAYING FOR SYRIA – and Donald Trump! PLEASE, MR. PRESIDENT, DON’T FUCK UP!!!!!

20170407_124344-1
Praying today for the people – THE CHILDREN! – of Syria! Praying our President acts with grace and wisdom.

20170406_173125
A scary, uncertain time. Peace! In the ‘hood, Syria, Russia, America! pics: R.T.

McGovern, Pelosi Call for Congress to Reconvene to Debate Military Authorization for Syria

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Congressman Jim McGovern, a senior House Democrat and leading critic of the expanded use of military force by presidents in both parties, joined House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and other lawmakers calling for Speaker Ryan to immediately call the House of Representatives back into session to debate an Authorization of the Use of Military Force for military actions taken in Syria.

In February 2017, Congressman McGovern led a bipartisan group of 19 lawmakers calling for Speaker Ryan to hold a debate and vote on the authorization for the use of military force (AUMF) for U.S. military operations in the Middle East.

Following President Trump’s unilateral action to order airstrikes against Syria last night, Congressman McGovern is renewing that call with this statement:

“Every president must obtain congressional authorization to launch military strikes and President Trump is no exception. President Trump’s unilateral action to attack Syria without consulting Congress and obtaining authorization is an alarming violation of the checks and balances put in place by the Constitution – safeguards established to prevent presidents from taking our country to war without the consent of the American people.

“Americans must have a say when it comes to war. President Trump’s failure to work with Congress to achieve a bipartisan consensus on military action has shut out the voices of the American people and raised serious concerns about the possibility of military escalation without any input from their elected leaders. The time to debate U.S. military operations is before we drop bombs and send troops – not after.

“Today I am joining the growing bipartisan call for Congress to immediately reconvene to debate the path forward for U.S. military operations in Syria. If the President intends to escalate U.S. military involvement in Syria, he must to come to Congress for an Authorization for Use of Military Force which is clearly crafted to meet the threat and prevent another endless war. The American people and our men and women in uniform deserve nothing less.”

*******

Full Text of Pelosi Letter to Speaker Ryan:

April 7, 2017

The Honorable Paul Ryan
Speaker of the House
H-232, United States Capitol
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Mr. Speaker,

I am writing to request that you call the House back in session immediately to debate any decision to place our men and women in uniform in harm’s way.

Bashar al-Assad ‘s chemical weapons attack on his own people places him outside the circle of civilized human behavior. Assad also continues to attack his own people with conventional weapons. Meanwhile, Russia props up the Assad regime and enables its brutal war crimes to continue.

The President’s action and any response demands that we immediately do our duty. Congress must live up to its Constitutional responsibility to debate an Authorization of the Use of Military Force against a sovereign nation.

As heartbreaking as Assad’s chemical weapons attacks on his own people was, the crisis in Syria will not be resolved by one night of airstrikes. The killing will not stop without a comprehensive political solution to end the violence. The American people are owed a comprehensive strategy with clear objectives to keep our brave men and women in uniform safe and avoid collateral damage to innocent civilians in Syria.

I look forward to hearing from you as soon as possible on this matter of grave concern to our national security.

best regards,

NANCY PELOSI
Democratic Leader

Part 2 – Woo news you can use … and a song🎵💗

At Holy Cross college:

image022

At Clark University:

Hewitt, Julie
Julie Hewitt

April 3 at Clark U: EPA exec to deliver Geller Lecture on the economics of water

Julie Hewitt, an Environmental Protection Agency executive, will present this year’s Albert, Norma and Howard ’77 Geller Lecture, “Waters… People…Value” at Clark University at 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 3, in the Grace Conference Room on the 1st floor of the Higgins University Center, 950 Main St.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

Hewitt is the associate director for economics in the EPA’s Office of Water, an office that ensures drinking water is safe, and restores and maintains oceans, watersheds, and their aquatic ecosystems to protect human health, support economic and recreational activities, and provide healthy habitat for fish, plants and wildlife.

Hewitt is an expert in the economics of water and water quality; she oversees a wide range of analyses that seek to understand how people are affected by changes to U.S. waters.

Hewitt previously served as a staff economist for the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. Hewitt holds a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.

This event is co-sponsored by the George Perkins Marsh Institute, the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise and the Economics Department.

image002

image020

festival pdf

petaLiving-social-15CrueltyFreeCompanies

DID YOU KNOW THE WORCESTER ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE AT 139 HOLDEN ST. HAS A “RE-TAIL” STORE?🐰🐰 Open 7 days a week – noon to 5 p.m. All proceeds go towards the 💗 of the WARL dogs and cats! Adopt today!

The cat’s meow! For sale:

20170331_114333-1
pics: R.T.

20170331_114429-1

20170331_114337-1

20170331_114417-1

20170331_114353-1

20170331_114403-1

20170327_115332-2
Jett! What are you doing in this post?!

20170331_114358-1

20170331_114424-1