Clark U – always in style! Fall dialogue symposium!

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Cece, what are you doing in this listing?!! pic: R.T.

Clark University’s fall dialogue symposium to focus on the “public good”

Lectures, art exhibit to highlight how the arts, humanities unite us in common pursuits

This fall, Clark University’s Higgins School of Humanities’ dialogue symposium “Common Pursuits/Public Good” will consider how the arts and humanities contribute to the public good through acts of advocacy and teaching; creation and critique; contemplation and scholarship.

“A commitment to the public good premises a system of shared values, even as those values change and, sometimes, come into conflict with each other,” wrote Meredith Neuman, director of the Higgins School of Humanities. “Consensus can be elusive, and compromise difficult, but the pursuit continues.”

All events listed below are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, they will be held on the Clark University campus in Dana Commons, 36 Maywood St., Worcester.

Exhibit

“ENGAGE: An exhibit by William Chambers”
On display from September 12 through November 21
Higgins Lounge, 2nd Floor, Dana Commons
Socially engaged art exists at the intersection between powerful symbolic statements and quantifiable political change. Part installation, part performance, wholly participatory, this exhibit will feature two works by artist William Chambers – “Service Station” and “Repairs” – that explore the power of art objects to foster conversation on important issues and to allow for the unexpected. This exhibit is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Department of Visual and Performing Arts. (Chambers will give a lecture on Wed., Nov. 8.)

Community Conversation

“What’s In It for Us? A Community Conversation on the Public Good”
Thursday, September 28
7pm
Higgins Lounge, 2nd Floor, Dana Commons
How do we support, utilize, and recognize contributions to the public good? Clark University professors Barbara Bigelow (Graduate School of Management) and Toby Sisson (Studio Art) will share their respective expertise in dialogic process and community-based art as facilitators of the discussion. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and Difficult Dialogues.

Discussion

“Why Bother with Prison Education?”
Thursday, October 5
4:30pm
Higgins Lounge, 2nd Floor, Dana Commons
Arguments for the value of prison education generally focus on larger social benefits, such as reduced recidivism, but arguments might also be made for the less quantifiable but no less transformative outcomes for individuals themselves. Poet Jill McDonough (UMass Boston) and Arthur Bembury (Executive Director of Partakers, a non-profit organization devoted to helping volunteers mentor incarcerated students), will lead this conversation on the fundamental role of education in the prison system. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Department of English, and the Hiatt Center for Urban Education.

Panel

“Why Get Involved with Prison Education?”
Tuesday, October 17
4:30pm
Higgins Lounge, 2nd Floor, Dana Commons
In this follow-up to “Why Bother with Prison Education?”, Clark University Professor Shelly Tenenbaum (Sociology), former Clark student Claude Kaitare, and Steffen Seitz of the Petey Greene prison tutoring program will discuss the various goals of prison education programs, offer reflections on their own experiences, and discuss volunteer opportunities. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Department of Sociology.

Readings

“Terror Rising: The Village Mob”
Wednesday, October 25
7pm
Higgins Lounge, 2nd Floor, Dana Commons
Professors Gino DiIorio (Theater) and James Elliott (English), and Jennifer Plante (The Writing Center) will read scary stories that turn our attention from the fear of the monster to the fear of the mob. This event is sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities.

Off-Campus Lecture

“Community and Memory: The Bullard Photographs”
Sunday, October 29
4pm
Belmont A.M.E. Zion Church
55 Illinois Street, Worcester
Cheryll Toney Holley (Sonksq and historian of the Nipmuc Nation and Hassanamisco Band of Nipmuc Indians) and Professor Janette Thomas Greenwood (History) will lead this discussion of how the recently discovered William Bullard photographs of Beaver Brook residents (1897-1917) can help reconstruct this neighborhood, its families, and their stories, suggesting lessons we can learn about community and memory today. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Department of History. Rediscovering an American Community of Color: The Photographs of William Bullard, 1897-1917 will be on display at the Worcester Art Museum from October 14, 2017 to February 25, 2018.

Lecture

“Race/Memory/Public Space”
Friday, November 3
12pm
Higgins Lounge, 2nd Floor, Dana Commons
Cultural historian Mabel O. Wilson (Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation), who has written about the National African American Museum of History and Culture and was a designer of the University of Virginia’s Memorial for Enslaved African American Laborers, will examine current and historical intersections of race, architecture, and the public realm. This event is part of the African American Intellectual Culture Series and is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Office of the Provost, Africana Studies, and the Department of Political Science through the Chester Bland Fund.

Lecture

“Health Care for Good: What We Need to Learn from Radical Clinics”
Tuesday, November 7
7pm
Higgins Lounge, 2nd Floor, Dana Commons
Author, performer, and practitioner Terri Kapsalis will draw upon the history of radical clinics linked to political movements, such as the Black Panther Party and the Women’s Health Movement, to address the continued need to expand economic and geographic access to quality health care and to offer a vision of what radical health care has been and can be. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities; the Center for Gender, Race, and Area Studies; and Women’s and Gender Studies.

Lecture

“Art as Social Practice”
Wednesday, November 8
7pm
Higgins Lounge, 2nd Floor, Dana Commons
William Chambers, instructor at Massachusetts Bay Community College and Visual Arts Chair at the Bancroft School, will consider how socially engaged art has the power to interrogate privilege and inequity as well as identity-based pretexts for social and political discrimination. This event is sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities.

Also at Higgins this semester:

Lecture

“The Science of Undeath: Zombies and Animated Corpses in Historical Perspective”
Wednesday, October 18
4:30pm
Higgins Lounge, 2nd Floor, Dana Commons
Winston Black (History, Assumption College) will discuss how and why medieval scholars debated corpse animation and hence understood the porous boundaries between life and death. Clark University Professor Deborah Robertson (Biology) will offer commentary. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, Early Modernists Unite, and the Departments of Biology and History.