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Clark U news …

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This Friday! March 31

Free Screening and Discussion of Award-Winning Doc ‘The Case
of the Three Sided Dream’ at Clark University

Clark University will host a free screening of the documentary Rahsaan Roland Kirk: The Case of the Three Sided Dream this Friday, March 31, at 7 p.m. in Razzo Hall, 92 Downing St.

There will be a discussion with the film’s director, Adam Kahan, immediately following.

Adam_Kahan
Adam Kahan

This event is free and open to the public.

The film is the story of multi-instrumentalist Rahsaan Roland Kirk who went from blind infant, to child prodigy, to adult visionary, to political activist and finally to paralyzed showman who played until the day he died from stroke in 1977 at age 42.

Since its world premiere in 2014 at the South By Southwest Film Festival (SXSW), the film has garnered rave reviews including praise for Director Kahan and a renewed respect for Kirk, who Jimi Hendrix once described as “a stone cold blues musician.”

Rahsaan Roland Kirk: The Case of the Three Sided Dream, an official selection of the 2014 Full Frame Documentary Film Festival and the 2015 Big Sky International Film Festival, took home Best Documentary honors at the Pan African Film Festival and Soundtrack Cologne, both in 2015.

Jazz Times calls Kirk, “an artist who fiercely asserted both his creativity and his personhood while pushing against two characteristics [blindness and blackness] society would use to diminish him in any way it could.”

“My purpose,” Kahan told Esquire last year, “was really to celebrate Rahsaan Roland Kirk and his legacy, which is largely as a musician and performer.”

Kahan added, “He was a presence, and I wanted his presence to be on screen, above and beyond anyone else, playing his music and telling his story in his own words.”

In making his film, Kahan eschewed the usual documentary format, which might include musicologists and historians, in favor of a more “impressionistic and organic film.”

For more information, please visit: www.rahsaanfilm.com.

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Silber Mohamed book jacket cmp(1)

Clark University professor’s new book examines what it means to ‘become American’

The New Americans’ examines immigration policy, focuses on protests and experiences of five Latino national origin groups

In 2006, millions of Latinos mobilized across the United States to protest far-reaching immigration legislation that would have criminalized undocumented immigrants and anyone who helped them enter or stay in the U.S. In her new book, Clark University political science professor Heather Silber Mohamed suggests that these unprecedented protests marked a major milestone for the Latino population — one that is even more relevant today with the immigration debate back in the forefront of American politics.

“The New Americans?: Immigration, Protest, and the Politics of Latino Identity” illuminates questions at the heart of American political culture: specifically, what does it mean to “become” American? Silber Mohamed focuses on the 2006 immigration marches. Taking advantage of a unique natural experiment, her research uses survey data to examine how protest and the immigration debate can influence Latinos’ sense of belonging in the U.S.

In her book, Silber Mohamed charts major developments in US immigration policy over the last 50 years, and explores the varied historical experiences of the five largest Latino national origin groups currently in the US— Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Salvadorans and Dominicans.

She provides in-depth analysis of the Latino population, particularly in response to the politics of immigration. This nuanced study yields important insights for understanding the ongoing debate over immigration reform and the extent to which it will unify this diverse population.

Silber Mohamed spent six years working on Capitol Hill in both the Senate and the House of Representatives. The combination of her personal background (her father’s family fled Fidel Castro’s dictatorship in Cuba) and her policy experience contributed to her academic preoccupation with the effects of political debate on Latino attitudes and incorporation.

“I find that the distinct message (‘We Are America’) advanced by the Latino community during the 2006 protests led group members to think differently about what it means to be American,” said Silber Mohamed. “For some Latinos, the protests in 2006 increased their sense of belonging in the US. These events contrast sharply with today’s political environment in which inflammatory rhetoric about immigrants and heightened deportations are increasingly forcing immigrants into the shadows.”

Silber Mohamed finds that the 2006 protests were empowering for immigrants. Yet, she notes that the current political environment may instead lead to fear and mistrust, even among some Latino U.S. citizens.

Deborah Schildkraut, author of “Americanism in the Twenty-First Century: Public Opinion in the Age of Immigration,” says the book “raises important normative questions about the conditions that promote a sense of belonging in an increasingly diverse United States.” Tomás R. Jiménez, author of “Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity,” calls it “a must read for anyone hoping to understand politics in America today.”

“The New Americans” expands on an article Silber Mohamed published in the American Politics Research in 2013. She has also published research in Latino Politics En Ciencia Politica and Politics, Groups, and Identities. She has been on the Clark faculty since 2013, and is affiliated with the Latin American and Latino Studies concentration and the program in Women’s and Gender Studies.

From Clark U …

Martin, Atyia
Dr. Atyia S. Martin

Clark University
950 Main St.

FREE!

March 21 at Clark U: Boston’s first Chief Resilience Officer to give lecture on ‘environmental racism’

Clark University will host “Environmental Racism: Identifying and Combating Injustice in our Communities and Beyond,” a talk by emergency preparedness expert Dr. Atyia S. Martin and community organizer Rushelle Frazier at 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 21, in the Higgins Lounge, Dana Commons, Clark University campus.

Mayor Martin J. Walsh appointed Dr. Martin as Boston’s first Chief Resilience Officer in August 2015. The goal of Dr. Martin’s two-year position, which is funded by the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities program, is to look at how ongoing issues like income inequality, a lack of affordable housing, poverty and racism could play a role in recovery from a disaster.

She is developing a resilience strategy for Boston and leading a city-wide effort to help Boston prepare for, withstand and recover from disasters such as floods, infrastructure failure and terrorism in addition to her focus on addressing social and economic issues.

Dr. Martin previously served as the director of the Office of Public Health Preparedness at the Boston Public Health Commission. She is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and has worked for the FBI and National Security Agency.

She has also taught in the Master of Homeland Security program at Northeastern University.

Rushelle Frazier is a queer black feminist writer, permaculture educator, urban farmer, counselor and organizer. She is a member of the 2015 Worcester Slam Team and co-coordinator of Choice Words Poetry Series. Frazier uses her passion for poetry and writing as a vehicle for justice and education, and has organized the Worcester Youth Spoken Word since 2015 and is the co-originator of the Dirty Gerund Poetry Show. She is also founder of Neighborhood Botanicals, a Worcester-based company that provides herbal education and related products and services.

This free, public talk is sponsored by the Clark Sustainability Collaborative and Black Student Union.

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Freund
Dr. Richard A. Freund

Clark U. to host lecture by archaeologist who discovered hidden Holocaust escape tunnel in Lithuania, March 30

Clark University will host “Escape from the Holocaust: Geoscience and Archaeology,” a lecture by esteemed American archaeologist Dr. Richard A. Freund, at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 30, in the Grace Conference Room, first floor of the Higgins University Center, 950 Main Street, Worcester.

This free, public lecture is sponsored by the The David H. ’65 and Edith Chaifetz Endowed Fund for Jewish Studies.

In this talk, Professor Freund will discuss his recent work in Vilna, Lithuania, where he and an excavation team used electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) technology to uncover an escape tunnel which had been hidden for 70 years. The 100-foot tunnel, which was found between five and nine feet below the surface, had been dug over the course of 76 days by 80 prisoners using spoons and other small tools. On the last night of Passover in 1944, the prisoners attempted the escape the tunnel; only 11 survived. Professor Freund’s team also uncovered a previously unknown mass burial pit next to the tunnel which may hold the remains of thousands of people.

Professor Freund is the Maurice Greenberg Professor of Jewish History and the director of the Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Hartford. His books “Digging Through the Bible” (2009) and “Digging Through History” (2016) have unearthed questions about the past, including the Bible, the lost island of Atlantis, and the Holocaust.

Freund’s discovery made international headlines last year. Professor Freund and his colleagues worked on a “Nova” documentary on this discovery, “Holocaust Escape Tunnel,” which will premiere on PBS on April 19.

Worcester news you can use!

festival pdf

WORCESTER STORM INFO:

Parking ban in effect early Tuesday, City offices closed, trash collection delayed

Worcester prepares for 18+inch storm!

In anticipation of Tuesday’s snow storm, predicted to drop 18-plus inches on Worcester, City Manager Edward M. Augustus, Jr. on Monday made the following announcements:

CITY STORM RESPONSE

· Public works crews began pretreating the city’s streets at noon Monday and will continue through the evening. Morning crews will be ready to go starting at 4 a.m. Tuesday, with more than 350 pieces of equipment ready to plow, salt and sand.

· The city’s Customer Service line, 508-929-1300, will be staffed starting at 6:30 a.m. through the end of the storm.

· The City’s Emergency Operations Center at the new Regional Emergency Communications Center will open Tuesday morning and stay open throughout the storm, to allow representatives from various City departments, public utilities and the Worcester Public Schools to coordinate their response.

PARKING BAN

· A declared winter parking ban will go into effect at 2 a.m. Tuesday. Residents can check the city’s website to find out where to park on their street. The parking ban is an essential part of keeping the city’s streets clear in a snow emergency, and the Worcester Police Department teams will be enforcing the ban as soon as it begins, with tickets and tows where necessary.

· All municipal garages will be open and free to the public starting at 6:30 p.m. Monday, through the duration of the storm, until 8 a.m. Wednesday.

TRASH/RECYCLING COLLECTION

· Trash and recycling collection will be postponed for Tuesday. Collection across the City will be delayed by one day. Tuesday’s collection areas will be picked up on Wednesday; Wednesday areas will be collected on Thursday, and so on. This will allow for all available resources to be put towards plowing and clearing the roads.

SCHOOLS

· The Worcester Public Schools have canceled classes for Tuesday.

CITY OFFICES CLOSED

· City Manager Augustus has ordered all municipal offices closed on Tuesday, in keeping with Gov. Charlie Baker’s call to keep as many people as possible off the roads. City Hall, the Worcester Public Library, the Worcester Senior Center will all be closed to the public, and to all non-essential city employees.

· All City Hall meetings, including City Council, will be postponed.

· City Manager Augustus also urged all Worcester businesses to consider closing if possible on Tuesday, or to encourage employees whose jobs allow to work from home.

SHELTERS

St. John’s [Church on Temple Street] will again open its emergency overflow homeless shelter Monday evening.

The St. John’s food pantry will remain open throughout the day Tuesday.

The city’s emergency shelter at Worcester Technical High School will be ready if needed for large-scale power outages or other emergencies requiring the sheltering of a large number of people.

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Fred Astaire called her “beautiful dynamite” …

Worcester news you can use!🌸🌻🌺💐🌼

Edwards, Chris
Chris Edwards

Clark University
950 Main St.

March 16 at Clark University: regional transgender author to discuss new memoir, ‘BALLS: It Takes Some To Get Some’

Boston-area author and transgender advocate Chris Edwards will talk about his life-changing journey and read from his memoir, “BALLS: It Takes Some to Get Some,” at Clark University at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 16, in the Higgins Lounge, Dana Commons, 2nd Floor.

The event is part of the Higgins School of Humanities’ spring dialogue symposium, “What’s so funny?” which includes lectures, community conversations and exhibits on humor.

Edwards grew up in the Boston suburbs and started the process of transitioning from female to male at the age of 26 when he was a copywriter at a high profile ad agency in Boston.

Edwards, who came out at a company board meeting before his white, middle-aged colleagues, endured 28 painful and extensive surgeries to become the man he is today.

He’ll reveal how humor helped him negotiate his gender transition and gain acceptance from his family, friends, and colleagues at a time when the word “transgender” was almost non-existent.

Edwards has been interviewed by O Magazine, the Chicago Tribune, Refinery29, Vice.com, the Improper Bostonian, New York Post and NECN about his book, and about being young and transgender in the workplace. He was recently interviewed by The Boston Globe about his decision to attend his 10-year high school reunion while transitioning from Kristin to Chris.

“That’s when it hit me … everyone was going to assume I didn’t show up because I didn’t have the, well, balls,” Edwards told the Boston Globe. “And while technically that might have been true (that surgery was years away), after publicly transitioning in front of 500 coworkers I’d developed quite a set of cojones. I was not about to let my former classmates think I was ashamed. I was going.”

Books will be on sale and a signing will follow Edwards’ talk. This free, public event is sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Women’s and Gender Studies Program.

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EB3KP2 Flintlock pistol display at Culzean Castle, South Ayrshire, Scotland
Flintlock pistol display at Culzean Castle, South Ayrshire, Scotland

March 16 at Clark University: historian to give talk, ‘Controlling Guns, Then and Now’

Historian Lois Schwoerer will present, “Controlling Guns, Then and Now,” at Clark University at 4:30 p.m., Thursday, March 16, in the Higgins Lounge, Dana Commons, 2nd Floor.

This lecture offered as part of the Roots of Everything Series.

Currently in the U.S. much of the debate around gun control focuses on the second amendment, however, struggles between government effects to regulate gun ownership and public gun culture date back to the 16th and 17th century England. When the English government tried to limit possession and use of gun to wealthy subjects, the policy was met with outrage and willful disobedience.

In this timely talk, Professor Schwoerer will examine the impact of gun ownership and regulation on both the government and private subjects of early modern England. Mark Miller, professor of political science and director of Clark’s Law and Society concentration, will offer commentary.

Schwoerer is Elmer Louis Kayser Professor Emerita of History at George Washington University and Scholar in Residence at the Folger Shakespeare Library; she was a member of GWU’s History Department for 32 years. Professor Schwoerer’s recent book “Gun Culture in Early Modern England” identifies and analyzes England’s domestic gun culture from 1500 to 1740, uncovering how guns became available, what effects they had on society, and how different sectors of the population contributed to gun culture.

The Roots of Everything is a lecture series sponsored by the Early Modernists Unite (EMU) — a faculty collaborative bringing together scholars of medieval and early modern Europe and America—in conjunction with the Higgins School of Humanities. The series highlights various aspects of modern existence originating in the early modern world and teases out connections between past and present.

This free, public event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Early Modernists Unite, and the Department of History.

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Purchase these NOT-TESTED-ON-BUNNIES cosmetics and personal care products at Walgreens, CVS, Target and your local super-market. Go cruelty-free!!

petaLiving-social-15CrueltyFreeCompanies

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Rose’s fave saint – ST. FRANCIS XAVIER – Patron Saint of Animals. This little St. Francis sits by Rose’s back door, blessing Lilac and Jett as they enter and leave the apartment. pic: R.T.

St. John’s Church
Temple Street, Worcester

ST. FRANCIS NOVENA

THE 94th ANNUAL NOVENA OF GRACE IN HONOR OF ST. FRANCIS XAVIER will begin Saturday, March 4 and run through Sunday, March 12.

Mass and Novena prayers will be held on the weekdays at 9:15 AM, 12:15 and 6:15 PM and on the regular weekend schedule (Saturday 4:15 and 7:15 PM, Sunday 8 and 10:15 AM, 12:15 and 7:15 PM).

Benediction and Novena prayers will be celebrated at 2:15 PM on March 4th and March 11th.

This year’s theme is “The Love of Christ Impels.”

All are welcome and encouraged to participate in this great Lenten tradition!

Tomorrow! Thursday, Feb. 16: Talk at Clark U to explore dark humor in contemporary African American art

Barber, Tiffany
Tiffany E. Barber

absolutely_hilarious
Absolutely Hilarious, 1997. Peter Williams (born 1952). Oil on canvas.

Clark University
950 Main St.

FREE TO ALL!

Clark University will host “Dark Humor and the African Image,” a lecture by curator Tiffany E. Barber, at 7 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 16, in the Higgins Lounge in Dana Commons.

This free, public event is part of the Higgins School of Humanities’ spring symposium, “What’s So Funny?” as well as the on-going African American Intellectual Culture Series.

Barber will talk about how African American artists use satire, visual puns, farce, absurdity, kitsch, and the bizarre to present reverent, positive images of blackness in order to counteract the experience of slavery and racism.

She will draw upon her recent exhibition, “Dark Humor: African American Art from the University of Delaware,” to consider the significance of humor in contemporary art. She will discuss how black artists such as Camille Billops, David Hammons, Barkley Hendricks, and Peter Williams employ subversive humor to question the currency of cultural and racial stereotypes.

Barber is a scholar, curator, and writer of twentieth and twenty-first century visual art and performance with a focus on artists of the black diaspora living and working in the United States.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Office of the Provost, and the Department of Visual Performing Arts.

At Clark U in Main South: What’s so funny?!😄😂😜

But first …

From Bill Maher:

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Clark University’s Higgins School of Humanities’ spring dialogue symposium asks ‘What’s so funny?’

Lectures, exhibits and films examine how humor connects and divides

This spring, Clark University’s Higgins School for Humanities presents “What’s so funny?” a symposium that comprises lectures, community conversations and exhibits on humor.

“Our symposium asks how humor creates and fragments communities. What larger cultural, social, and political role does humor play? In short, what can we learn when we take jokes, comedy, and laughter seriously?” wrote Amy Richter, director of the Higgins School of Humanities.

All events listed below are FREE TO ALL and will be held on the Clark University campus:

Lecture

“The Science of Laughter”
7 p.m.
Wednesday, February 1
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
British neuroscientist and stand-up comedian Sophie Scott (University College London) will discuss the sometimes surprising science and evolution of laughter—an emotion with its roots in play and social bonding. She will explore questions such as: How and why do humans laugh? What do brain studies reveal about laughter? What happens when laughter goes wrong? This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Frances L. Hiatt School of Psychology at Clark.

Lecture and exhibition

“Cartooning; Sense, Nonsense, Applications”
4 p.m.
Tuesday, February 7
Exhibition runs from Tuesday, Feb. 7, through Monday, May 22
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Cartoonists James Sturm and Caleb Brown will look beyond graphic novels and iconic characters to emphasize cartooning’s ability to communicate complex information quickly and effectively, share powerful and precise visual narratives, and engage readers of all ages, nationalities, and socio-economic backgrounds.
Sturm, cofounder of The Center for Cartoon Studies, will curate an accompanying exhibit on “applied cartooning.” The selected images will highlight the ways the medium itself is being used to innovate and problem-solve in medicine, business, education, and other fields.
This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, Difficult Dialogues, and the Media, Culture and the Arts Program.

Lecture

“Dark Humor and the African American Image”
7 p.m.
Thursday, February 16
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Scholar and curator Tiffany E. Barber will draw upon her recent exhibition, “Dark Humor: African American Art from the University of Delaware,” to consider the significance of humor in contemporary art. Barber will discuss how contemporary black artists, such as Camille Billops, David Hammons, Barkley Hendricks, and Peter Williams, employ subversive humor to question the currency of cultural and racial stereotypes.
This event is part of the African American Intellectual Culture Series, and is cosponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Office of the Provost, and the Department of Visual and Performing Arts.

Talk and book signing

“Light in the Dark: A Talk on Writing and Humor”
7p.m.
Thursday, February 23
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Is it possible to fake your own death in the twenty-first century? With six figures of student loan debt, author Elizabeth Greenwood was tempted to find out. She set off on a foray into the world of death fraud, where for $30,000 a consultant can make you disappear, possibly forever. Greenwood will read from her book “Playing Dead: A Journey Through the World of Death Fraud” (2016), and introduce us to men and women desperate enough to lose their identities—and their families—to begin again. She will lead a discussion on the role of humor in illuminating and exploring our darkest impulses. A book signing will follow. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Writing Center.

Lecture and book signing

“BALLS: It Takes Some to Get Some”
7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 1
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
For Chris Edwards, a former advertising creative director, changing his gender from female to male took balls…and a damn good sense of humor. How did he find the courage to come out at a company board meeting of white, middle-aged executives; to endure 28 painful and extensive surgeries; or to show up at his 10-year high school reunion? Edwards will read from his funny and poignant memoir “BALLS: It Takes Some to Get Some” (2016), and share how humor helped him re-brand himself and gain acceptance from his family, friends, and colleagues at a time when the word “transgender” was almost non-existent.
A book signing will follow. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Women’s and Gender Studies Program.

Workshop

“The Truth is Funny: An Improvisation Workshop”
7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 15
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
“The truth is funny. Honest discovery, observation, and reaction is better than contrived invention.” The words of actor Del Close have inspired countless improvisational comics. In this workshop, Dan Balel (Theater) and Gino DiIorio (Theater) will lead us in theater games and improvisation exercises to develop trust, reveal truths, and generate laughs.
This event is cosponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Theatre Arts Program.

Film Screening and Discussion

“’THE LAST LAUGH’; A Film Screening and Discussion”
7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 21
Jefferson Academic Center, Room 320
“THE LAST LAUGH,” a feature documentary by Ferne Pearlstein, proceeds from the premise that the Holocaust would seem to be an absolutely off-limits topic for comedy. But is it? History shows that even the victims of the Nazi concentration camps used humor as a means of survival and resistance. Still, any hint of comedy in connection with this horror risks diminishing the suffering of millions. So where is the line? If we make the Holocaust off limits, what are the implications for other controversial subjects— 9/11, AIDS, racism—in a society that prizes freedom of speech? Valerie Sperling (Holocaust and Genocide Studies/Political Science) and Amy Richter (History) will facilitate a conversation after the film.
This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program, and Screen Studies.

Lecture

“Brother Jonathan Runs for President: American Humor, Vernacular Values, and the Rise of Trump”
7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 28
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Challenges to America’s most sacred myths fuel the traditions of vernacular humor, which asserts faith in ordinary Americans and mistrust of elites. Spoof presidential campaigns by ostensibly ordinary citizens—heirs of Brother Jonathan, folklore’s quintessential American—have mocked the ideological contradictions of presidential campaigns whose vernacular values nonetheless yield elite results.

Professor Judith Yaross Lee (Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University) will consider how nearly 200 years of spoof campaigns in cartoon, video, newspaper features, and other formats highlight values and visions always at stake in the presidential race, but especially in the candidacy of Donald Trump. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Department of History, and the Bland Fund of the Department of Political Science.

Tina Z. 🎋 parked here … WE HOPE TINA RUNS FOR CITY COUNCIL! – nice showing last election cycle, Tina!🎉🎉

HOME …

Artists: Joan Baldwin, Nina Bellucci, Joan Benotti, Jennifer Day, Jenna DeLuca, Matthew Dickey, Erin Diebboll, Gary Duehr, Kevin Frances, Jan Johnson, Kelly Anona Kerrigan, Carol McMahon, Evan Morse, Chelsea Revelle, Soha Saghazadeh, Brittany Severance, Dawn Southworth

Exhibition Dates: January 17 – February 26, 2017

Exhibition locations: Schiltkamp Gallery, Traina Center for the Arts,

Clark University – 92 Downing St.

Gallery Hours: Monday -Thursday, 9-9 / Friday, 9-4 / Saturday & Sunday, 12-5

Opening reception: Wednesday January 25, 4:30 – 6

Gallery Talk with Artists:Thursday, February 9, 12-1

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The word “home” can have myriad associations for each person, but on a broad archetypal level, home conjures the realm of domestic life, a household with various members, a secure dwelling, private space, and a place of sanctuary and refuge.

Home also can be seen as existing in concentric circles – the initial ring being that which encircles the individual and members of a household most closely – whether it be a private house, communal residence, apartment, dormitory, or temporary shelter – followed by larger circles of “hometown” and ever expanding associations with region, nationality, and identity.

To “feel at home” suggests a sense of belonging and comfort. But, of course, it is quite possible not to feel at home in one’s actual domicile or physical location and the concept of home may feel elusive or precarious depending on life circumstances, geography, and politics. The artists in this exhibition offer various perspectives on this universal longing for “home” – the quest for a sense of safety, peace, acceptance, and well-being.

Some of the work confronts issues of displacement and loss, while other pieces depict the simple pleasures of domestic life and the careful construction of personal space.

The potency of everyday objects and the memories they trigger are also a focus of investigation. And a few of these artists play on sentimental or cliché associations of home. Though the stories are often personal, the themes are universal.

This was a juried show in response to an open call. The artists included come from all over New England and range from graduate student to well-established and renowned professional.

This exhibition was curated and installed by the students in ARTS 296 Gallery Culture and Practice, a “problems of practice” course, in which students explore opportunities to connect what they learn in the classroom with issues and matters faced by professionals working beyond the campus.

Those students are: Madison Boardman, Maria Escobar Pardo, Katlyn Greger, Grant Henry, Celine Hunt, Autumn Perez, Aliyah Rawat, F. N. U. Rouran, Andrea Schuster, Andre Toribio, and Amy Yeager.

‘Home Grown: Cultivating the next generation of urban farmers’

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pics:Rose Tirella

Clark U, 950 Main St.

7 p.m.

Nov. 9

FREE TO ALL!

Clark University to host agricultural expert for ‘Home Grown: Cultivating the next generation of urban farmers,’ Nov. 9

Clark University will host “Home Grown: Cultivating the Next Generation of Urban Farmers,” a lecture by agricultural expert Jennifer Hashley, at 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 9, in the Higgins Lounge in Dana Commons.

Demand for fresh, locally-grown food close to urban centers is increasing. In this lecture, Hashley will present her strategies for raising the next generation of environmentally responsible farmers.

Hashley has spent more than 15 years in the field of sustainable agriculture. She is the director of the New Entry Sustainable Farming Project at Tufts University’s Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, and has helped transform New Entry into a nationally recognized farmer training program. She is responsible for the overall strategic direction and management of the organization that includes three incubator training farms, horticultural, livestock, and farm business training courses, a food hub (World PEAS), and several national -scale, capacity-building programs for beginning farmers and food security efforts.

Hashley is also an agricultural business instructor for the Mass. Department of Agricultural Resources and serves on the boards and steering committees of multiple agricultural organizations. She has earned numerous leadership awards for her food systems work, and has been selected as an Environmental Leadership Fellow and an Eisenhower Agriculture Fellow. In 2003, she and her husband, a full-time vegetable farmer, started Pete and Jen’s Backyard Birds, a diversified pasture-based livestock operation. This year, they relocated their farm to Lincoln, Mass., where they manage Codman Community Farms.

This free, public event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Department of Economics and the George Perkins Marsh Institute.

It is part of the Higgins School’s Fall 2016 series “Home (De)Constructed,” which explores what “home” truly means.

Worcester happenings, always in style!

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Rick Moody

Nov. 3

Free to all!

Award-winning ‘The Ice Storm’ author Rick Moody to discuss his latest novel at Clark University, 950 Main St.

Award-winning author Rick Moody will discuss and read from his latest, highly acclaimed novel, “Hotels of North America,” at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, in the Higgins Lounge of Dana Commons, at Clark University.

The event, presented by the English department at Clark, is free and open to the public.

Hiram Frederick “Rick” Moody, is an American novelist and short story writer known for the 1994 bestselling novel “The Ice Storm,” a chronicle of the dissolution of two suburban Connecticut families set in 1973, which was also made into a feature film of the same title. His first novel, “Garden State,” was the winner of the 1991 Pushcart Press Editor’s Choice Award.

Many of Moody’s works have been praised by fellow writers and critics alike, and in 1999 The New Yorker chose him as one of America’s most talented young writers, listing him on their “20 Writers for the 21st Century” list.
“Hotels of North America,” Moody’s sixth novel, is described as “a darkly comic portrait of a man who comes to life in the most unexpected of ways: through his online hotel reviews.”

It follows protagonist Reginald Edward Morse through his top-rated reviews, revealing more about his life than just details of hotels. Reginald’s sudden disappearance leaves behind his carefully constructed virtual presence, which Moody crafts into a novel about identity, intimacy, loneliness and love.
Dwight Garner, of The New York Times, said the book “is Moody’s best novel in many years,” and described it as “a little book of irony, wit and heartbreak… a close examination of the middle-aged American male in sexual, emotional and financial free fall.”

Moody has taught in several writing programs across the country; he is currently a lecturer at New York University. His work has appeared in several publications including Esquire, Harper’s and The New Yorker. Moody is the recipient of several awards including a Paris Review Aga Khan Prize and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

And…

fathersvietnam

Free Screening of award-winning doc ‘My Father’s Vietnam’ at Clark U, Nov. 9

Free!

Clark will host a screening and discussion of the documentary film “My Father’s Vietnam,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 9, in Razzo Hall, 92 Downing Street.

The event is free, open to the public, and will be followed by a discussion with the film’s director, Soren Sorensen, a visiting lecturer of the Visual and Performing Arts department at Clark.

The discussion will also include Rik Carlson, who actively protested the Vietnam War, and David Carlson, an Iraq War Veteran who is currently the coordinator of Student Veteran Services at the University of Vermont.

Since its world premiere at the 2015 Rhode Island International Film Festival (RIIFF), screenings at festivals around the country have resulted in tearful interactions, expressions of empathy and deeply moving reflections among Vietnam Veterans and their loved ones.

The film, Sorensen’s first feature-length effort, focuses on the filmmaker’s father, Peter Sorensen, and two men he served with who were killed in Vietnam in 1970. “My Father’s Vietnam,” which took home Best Picture (Documentary) at the 2016 Flagler Film Festival in Florida, deliberately eschews sensationalism in favor of subtlety.

“The Vietnam Era is the backdrop for a lot of big, infamous movies,” said Sorensen. “I deliberately made a quieter, more intimate Vietnam War film not only about my father’s year in Vietnam but also about our country’s connection to war in a broad sense.”

The director added, “The film is really about war’s destructive impact on human relationships before, during, and after these wars are waged.”

“My Father’s Vietnam,” which won the Soldiers and Sacrifice Grand Prize at the 2015 RIIFF, was recently released on Blu-ray, DVD, and multiple Video-On-Demand platforms including iTunes and Amazon.

Sorensen concluded, “As personal as the film is, I think that my family’s story is not at all uncommon. This isn’t just my father’s story or my story. It’s everyone’s story.”

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The City of Worcester

Worcester is beginning the process of developing its Annual Action Plan for the federal entitlement grant period of July 1, 2017- June 30, 2018.

Applications will therefore be solicited from potential grant sub-recipients interested addressing priority needs identified in the City of Worcester Five (5) Year Consolidated Plan (2015 – 2020).

A Request for Proposal (RFP) for Yr. 43 / City FY 18 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) grant funds will be published on Monday, November 7, 2016.

Proposals that address eligible CDBG activities through Public Services or Public Facility & Improvements will be considered.

RFPs for the HOPWA and ESG grant programs will also be published simultaneously.

The RFPs will be due to the City no later than Wednesday, December 7, 2016 at 4:00 PM.

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A FREE MOVIE SCREENING OF REFUGEE: THE ERITREAN EXODUS

Wednesday, November 16

7:00 – 8:15pm

WEST BOYLSTON CINEMA

101 WEST BOYLSTON ST.

WEST BOYLSTON

5 pm

This film follows Chris Cotter,
an American traveler, as he
searches for answers about
the country’s seldom reported
refugee crisis. In his search,
Cotter explores a common
migration path through
Ethiopia into Israel, tracking
the plight of Eritrean
Refugees.

Chris and his crew
visit several refugee camps
including the never-before
documented Afar region. The
film brings the viewer on a
common migration path that
many Eritreans desperately
undertake for the slim hope
of freedom and security.

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The Worcester Public Library

3 Salem Square
508.799.1655
mywpl.org

The Worcester Public Library Presents
Art Lessons with Visual Artist Bayda Asbridge

FREE!!!

Three-part series is for children ages 7 to 12.

The Worcester Public Library will welcome local artist Bayda Asbridge for a series of art lessons for children from 7 to 12 years of age.

The programs will run from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturdays, October 29, November 26, and December 31.

Participants can sign up at the Children’s Desk.

The lesson for October 29 will be an Autumn Painting Party. For November 26 the lesson will celebrate Picture Book Month. Finally, for December 31 there will be an Arabian Nights themed lesson.

About Bayda Asbridge:

Bayda Asbridge is a multi-media artist and educator. She teaches art and craft at Worcester Art Museum and Worcester Craft Center. Bayda tailors her classes to be suitable for a wide age range of children; and ensures that classes are fun, engaging, and creative.

The event is free and open to the public.

This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Worcester Public Library.

For more information on the Worcester Public Library and a complete list of events and programs visit mywpl.org.

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As many of you know, Mass Audubon plays a key role in science education here it the City and perhaps an even expanding role with our Broad Meadow Brook Wildlife Sanctuary and newly opened Barbara Elliott Fargo Education Center.

This year Mass Audubon is holding their statewide annual meeting here in Worcester at the Hanover Theatre and we would love to attract hundreds and hundreds of Worcester boosters and fans.

Several local area folks are being recognized so that is reason to promote.

Please consider joining in…the more the merrier!

Thanks for considering if you can come- spread the word in any case!

Deb Cary, Executive Director
Broad Meadow Brook

Meeting Agenda

4:00 pm

Light refreshments prior to the evening’s program

4:30 pm
Business meeting and election of new Directors

Awards and Recognition
Audubon A Award
Noel Mann
Bryan Windmiller
MA Division of Ecological Restoration
Worcester Tree Initiative

Allen H. Morgan Memorial Award
Allen W. Fletcher

Conservation Teacher of the Year Awards
Lynn Fiandaca – Fall Brook Elementary School, Leominster
Melinda Forist – Monomoy Regional Middle School, Chatham
Stacey Hill – Doherty Memorial High School, Worcester

President’s Award
The Bobolink Project

Remarks and Reflections
Anita Walker, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Cultural Council

Reception immediately following with hors d’oeuvres, beer, and wine bar

About Anita Walker

Anita Walker has served as Executive Director of the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) since April 2007. Walker is the Commonwealth’s highest ranking cultural official, overseeing a range of grant programs, services, and advocacy for the arts,humanities, and sciences in communities across Massachusetts.

Anita has raised the visibility of the nonprofit creative sector as a driving force for growth and prosperity in Massachusetts. She led advocacy for the Mass Cultural Facilities Fund, which has invested $82 million in arts and cultural building projects statewide over eight years. CFF grants are leveraging more than $1.9 billion in spending on cultural building projects, providing more than 19,000 jobs, restoring many important historic structures, and attracting more than 18 million cultural tourists to Massachusetts annually.

Walker also led the development of MCC’s new UP Initiative to support organizations that recognize the power of inclusive design to grow audiences and enhance cultural experiences for all, and embrace inclusivity as core to their mission. The intent is to generate transformational experiences for participants that will not only build capacity but fuel insight and action.

Open House at Broad Meadow Brook
2:30 pm (before the meeting)

Please join us for an Open House celebration at Broad Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary prior to the meeting, beginning at 2:30 pm. Enjoy a tour of the wildlife sanctuary, visit the new Barbara E. Fargo Education Center, and help celebrate the 25 years in Worcester.

Transportation from Broad Meadow Brook Wildlife Sanctuary to the Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts and back will be available. Broad Meadow Brook Wildlife Sanctuary is located at 414 Massasoit Road, Worcester, MA 01604.

Kindly RSVP* by Tuesday, November 1

RSVP By Phone: 781-259-2133
RSVP By Email: emcbride@massaudubon.org

*Please let us know if you will be joining us for the open house at Broad Meadow Brook and if you have any transportation needs.

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Jett, what you doing in this post?!

Clark U always in style! … props for YOUR next film at Unique Finds! …and City Councilor Konnie Lukes’ slum housing

Clark University to host conversation with international acclaimed film director Gurinder Chadha, Oct. 24

Clark University will host “Film Making, Creativity, Migrant Biographies, Diasporic Disruption,” a conversation with internationally acclaimed film director Gurinder Chadha and Clark Sociology Professor Parminder Bhachu…

CLARK UNIVERSITY

Monday, October 24

at 6 p.m. in Dana Commons, 950 Main St.

Free to all!

Chadha is one of the most successful female film directors in the world; she has directed more than 15 films.

Her internationally-successful film “Bend It Like Beckham” (2002) was the highest grossing British-financed, British-distributed film ever in UK box office history until the more recent success of “Slumdog Millionaire” (2008). Her other notable films include “Bhaji on the Beach” (1993), “Bride and Prejudice” (2004) and “Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging” (2008). Her new film “The Viceroy’s House,” on the partition of India and Pakistan, will be released in early 2017.

Chadha started a media career in radio in the mid-1980s then moved into television as a BBC news reporter. She directed award-winning documentaries for the British Film Institute, BBC and Channel Four, and in 1989 released the documentary “I’m British but…,” which followed the lives of young British Asians. Many of Chadha’s films draw on her personal experience of being an Indian and English at the same time, and how she dealt with the duality of her identity.

Parminder Bhachu is a professor of sociology and an urban anthropologist from London who has been a citizen of Worcester for the past 25 years. She is a scholar of diasporic economic, cultural, and creative forms in global domains. Her publications and research focus on multiple migrants, whose second and third generation progeny – which includes Gurinder Chadha—are some of the most cutting edge creative agents in the world, spearheading creativity in the fields of technology, science, art, music, performance, architecture, and film. She was Henry R. Luce Professor of Cultural Identities and Global Processes for nine years and served as director of Clark’s Women’s Studies Program.

Professor Bhachu is the author of “Dangerous Designs: Asian Women Fashion the Dispora Economics” (2004) and “Twice Migrants” (1985), and is co-editor of “Immigration and Entrepreneurship: Culture, Capital and Ethnic Networks” (1993) and “Enterprising Women: Ethnicity, Economy & Gender Relations” (1988). She is currently working on a book, “Disruptive Diasporas: Migrant Creativity and Innovation in Hyper-Connected Worlds.”

Both Chadha and Bhachu share a multiple migrant diasporic biography, their families being a part of the Indian diaspora in East Africa. Both are honored in their respective fields for their work on the subject; Chadha was awarded the O.B.E. (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) by the Queen for her services to the British Film Industry.

This event is funded by the Office of The President, Office of the Provost, Cultural Studies and Communication, the Geography Department, History Department, the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the Screen Studies Program, the Sociology Department and the Political Science Department through the Chester Bland Fund.

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Some unique props at Unique Finds – 1329 Main St. (Open SAT, SUN, MON, TUES…7 days a week!!! Until 7 p.m.): pics:R.T.

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And if you’re looking to shoot your movie in a slum atmosphere, head to Worcester City Councilor Konnie Lukes’ rental property: the three decker on Harding/Millbury streets, Worcester. It’s the neighborhood eyesore! – R.T.

Today, around 5 p.m.:

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Look at these windows! pics:R.T.