Tag Archives: dogs

February ramblings!💐🌸🌻🎂

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Go, Dorrie, go!

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Dorrie does NOT wear fur – she just models it! 🐯🐶🐵🐸

By Dorrie Maynard

First, I would like to talk about my vehicle. I call it the bat mobile. Others sometimes refer to it as the Giving Van. It is beginning to be known around Worcester as the vehicle that hands out pet food on some days and necessitates to the less fortunate on other days.

It is a vehicle that is hard not to miss – a 2007 Black Toyota FJ Cruiser. I was the first person in Worcester to own one. I happened to be driving by
HarrToyota and they had one on
display. I went in with a few
friends. We had all decided that I
wasn’t buying, just looking. After I took it for a test drive, I asked: “Where do I sign?” I filled out the paperwork and waited for my “special order” to come in. It was the first new car I had ever purchased! I was so excited and, because it was so unique looking, every time I drove it, people would look and point! I vowed to keep it clean always!

Well, to those who know me, you know that never happened! My “truck” is always filled with things that are either coming or going. Almost every family member of mine has cleaned and/orsorted that vehicle out at least once. My nieces have done it several times. To people who don’t know me: if you ever happen to walk by my truck, you will think that someone is living in there
or living out of there! There are bags of bread, pet food, blankets, hats/gloves, “blessing bags,” chargers, and just general “stuff.”

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Dorrie’s cutie pies!

People call me all the time and tell me that they have things they need to get rid and ask if I could come and
get them, as they know I will always find homes for whatever they are getting rid of. I drive regularly to Shrewsbury and have driven to Auburn a few times in
the past month. I love sorting things and making gift packages of items that are going to various locations. I
bring things to Abby’s House for women, the Mustard Seed soup kitchen, …

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At a fund-raiser outside the glorious Mustard Seed for Dorrie’s CENTRAL MASS KIBBLE CONNECTION!!!

… WARL, a private, in-home cat rescue, a dog shelter in Connecticut. I also give to people that I know personally who are in need.

I am very fortunate that people who know me, know that I have this ability to “spread the love” or “share the wealth.” I hate to see things end up in the
trash or at the side of the road when I probably know someone who can use whatever is being re-homed.

I am considering starting a small non-profit that would enable me to pick up items from people and give them tax donation slips for their goods. At home I have a very large basement – I could start to warehouse items. I would run a free service to those in need and free pick up or drop off to people who want to just pass along their good, useable items.

Items would include but not
be limited to: household items, small furniture, linens, pots/pans, clothing, small appliances, etc. Of course, stipulations would have to be made: all items would need to be in clean, workable condition, as I would not
want to have to end up having to hire a dumpster to remove items that I could not pass on. … Just something
that I am thinking about as the 2017 begins.

Some other thoughts that are dancing in my head: all the pets that were adopted over the holidays that hopefully won’t end up back where they came
from or worse!

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Dorrie adopted these beauties …

… and has given Rose’s little Cece so many cute toys! Thanks, Auntie D!

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pics: R.T.

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Like Craigslist “free” to a good home. I
am confident that most animal rescues and shelters do their best to make sure these “failures” are few and far between, but I am sure there are some that cats and dogs that slip through
the cracks.

Several years ago,I had been looking for another dog after my first dog passed away, so I put it out there to all my friends that I was on the hunt. I was looking for an older, small female to be a companion to my other dog. A friend emailed me about a craigslist ad, “free to a good home.” The dog seemed perfect other than they described her as “protective.” I remember calling the
woman and begging her to keep the dog until I could get there to meet her. She mentioned that she had had several other calls that said they would just “take the dog.” I wanted to bring my current dog for a meet and greet to see if they would be comptable.

It was a Friday night drive to Dorchester in the middle ofrush hour. It took me 2.5 hours to get there. I got
lost several times and was ready to give up when the very kind woman offered to start walking to meet me. She described what she was wearing and I described
my “bat mobile” to her. We eventually met up and she directed me to her
house. When we arrived, I walked in and Princess attacked me, nipped my pants and practically lunged at my dog. I thought: This isn’t good, but I was patient and kept trying to get Princess to come near me. She was so attached to her owner and her kids, but they were moving and could not take her as their new lease did not allow dogs. I ended up saying, “What the heck, I’ll take
her and make it work!” I did give the woman $100 as she looked
like she could use it to help with moving expenses.

I brought Princess into my house and she has lived up to her name ever since!

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Princess is still “protective” and does not like strangers, especially men, but once guests are in my home and she knows the are “safe,” she does come around. I have no idea what her past was like, I know that I am her third and final owner, that she had been
“bred” and had had several litters. I guess that is why she gets along so well with my 3 year old dog that was
another rehoming find. They play like puppies even though Princess is 11 years old! They sleep together, play together, and eat together. I have found my pack!

Last and final rant. The streets of Worcester then and now. Many people know that I owned and operated a very “iconic” store on Highland Street. It was once known as the famous Shakie Jakes. I was there and loved
every minute of my owning my own business for 10 years, directly across the street from the Sole Proprietor.

It was a perfect spot for my business. I had always dreamed of running a resale shop but always found a million reasons why I couldn’t or shouldn’t. However,
when the opportunity came my way of following in the foot steps of such a landmark store, I had no more reasons
why I couldn’t.

However, owning and operating a small business is not all it is cracked up to be. Times change, my life
changed, other responsibilities became more important and, eventually, I decided to close shop. I will never regret following my dream of owning a resale store!

Unfortunately, the neighborhood changed, and the clientele started to become less and less desirable. Living in the
area, I found the same to be true as well. The small local businesses of Highland Street have all turned into a barber shop, a packaging/mail business, a nail and eye brow salon and a money exchange business. I am not saying they aren’t good for the neighborhood, but they are certainly not the Highland Street businesses that most remember, supported and loved to visit.

And with all that said, I will end my rants for early 2017 and look forward to sharing more stories and interests with you in the future!🌸🌻🌷

If anyone would like
to reach me for comment or questions, please feel free to email me at djmbytheelm@aol.com. All best to all!

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Jett 💙 the dog treats Dorrie gives him (and Lilac)! Dorrie passes out free dog and cat food to pet owners in need at the Mustard Seed, in Piedmont, every month.

Cece!

20161228_114244Rose’s late mom’s creche – just waiting for the swipe of Cece’s paw.      pics: R.T.

By Rosalie Tirella

So, it’s been two months of Cece, the homeless, half-starved kitten I was given as a (dubious?) reward for helping find homes for a pitbull mix, two cats, an assortment of hens and one elusive, hiding-in-the-nearby- woods rooster.

This has translated into:

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… my Polish immigrant granny’s Christmas creche she brought to America almost 90 years ago, along with all her hopes and dreams, SMASHED beyond Elmer’s help …

Most of my pretty potted plants that I nurtured and loved all spring, summer and fall …

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Dug up and dug into … possible peed into…

And here lies the culprit, on my chest, giving my boobies a good clawing if she feels herself slipping off …

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… She’s washing herself with that endearing little pink sandpaper tongue of hers while purring loudly …

The havoc that this 7-ounce feline creates wherever she sets her dainty little black paws – which is everywhere in my apartment, including refrigerator shelves after I shut the door! – is forgiven by her smitten owner …

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…ME!

What is it about this furry little demolition derby that sets my heart a flutter?

Is it because Cece looks like the little Black kitten – “Blackie” – that my mom and her two sisters (now all deceased) took in off the mean streets of Springfield during World War II when they were farmed out by my grandparents to work as maids for the Bishop of Springfield? (My mom left their Green Island tenement when she was 14 1/2 years old). They were the original cat ladies – but also pup lovers. Soft hearted and crazy cuz they were young and didn’t know any better, they convinced the good Bishop to buy them two Doberman pinschers – the pitbulls of their day. Which my mom and her sisters adored. Powerful dogs that you’d think would make dessert out of Blackie the kitten. But that never happened. The dogs – Rocky and Bridgette – loved my mom and her two sisters – and, like all dogs, lived to please their mistresses – and, like all good Dobbies, protect them to the max.  Rocky jumped on a visiting nun and broke her arm. He also bit a few people –  a scary and acutely painful experience for the person at the end of the large canine’s large canines –  getting his mistresses into big trouble. They were forced to give Rocky, to whom they fed horsemeat they bought at the butchers, to a farmer in the country. But Rocky loved them and escaped and weeks later came to their doorstep, haggard and bleeding at the tongue. He had cut himself bad trying to get at the milk in milk bottles – and died at my auntie’s ( his fave mistress) feet.

Here’s one of my aunts with Blackie:

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I love how she holds Blackie’s paw! In most of my late mom’s Sprinfield photos my mom and aunts are always holding some pet’s paw! Such sweet Catholic girls! So unprepared for my dad and uncles, all (except one!) killers.

So my Cece makes me think of my late mom and my two aunts during happy days of their lives – housekeeping but also dancing to Tommy Dorsey music in Springfield dance halls when big band music was the craze and dance halls were ubiquitous in this huge country of ours and all Americans – every last one! –  could dance. I mean REALLY DANCE. They knew and got rhythm. They bought sheet music and learned how to play the songs if they were musicians or learned ALL the lyrics, if they werent. … My mom and aunts were no different. They had a Victrola – which I now have in my kitchen – and 33s that played Doris Day, even AL Jolson ( “Hallelujah! I’m a bum again!”) …

When Cece first came into my life I burst into tears as she ran sideways into Lilac, my hound/shepherd mix! Not because I feared for her life (she could fit into the palm of my hand she was so small – not even weened!) but because of her just born-ness. Her newness in this mean old world. Her innocent recklessness in a world that could squelch her in a second. Her beautiful virgin confusion. I ran to her, scooped her up, still crying and thrust her to my chest! THERE THERE BABY GIRL! I blubbered. I’LL TAKE CARE OF YOU! I LOVE YOU!

And so I did and so I have. I taught my Cece (named after my late mom) how to lick drops of canned kittens milk from my finger tip – and then how to lap it from a tiny bowl I made for her out of an upside down instant coffee cover.

I scooped her up and kissed her little face when the dogs got too rough with her – and scolded the dogs for treating her like a chew toy with an edge they’d never seen in me. To their chagrin Cece liked their big dog water bowl better than her teeny one! And Mommy did nothing to keep her from defiling the waters!!

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The pure joy with which Cece attacks life moves me! Makes me forget our mortally dangerous soon to be President Donald Trump. The pain and hatred he’ll create fall to the wayside as Cece races through my kitchen. Guns pop out daisies as Cece makes a virgin dive from the table in my bedroom to my bed! And low and behold!!! I am young again! Tying a long strip of peach ribbon to notebook paper I’ve crumpled into a ball I run like a teenager in my apartment, yelling IT’S CECE! IT’S CECE! HERE COMES CECE AROUND THE BEND!!! And my little kitten is under foot going wild with the paper ball, pouncing on my ankles and giving them some good little bites. Ouch!!!

All babes do the same! Make joy out of nothing. Just last week I saw a poor family walking down a Worcester inner-city street. Mom had the usual clear plastic covering zippered up over the baby stroller she was pushing. Sometimes you just see cheap blankets thrown over the stroller giving warmth and protection to months-old babies in freezing New England weather. You worry about the babies’ little toes and fingers. You stare at the pain…no room at the inn. It’s still true, so many Christmases later! But then you see the Christmas miracle – or Christ himself – the six-year-old girl in her cheap autumn jacket that is out of season but mom wisely undergirds with sweater and shirt. Then there are her mittens and jaunty little yellow knit cap. So little girl is playful – pulls a Cece! As they cross the street, the little girl walks on tip toes – only in the white lines in the cross walk! Stretching her little jean clad legs so her feet won’t touch the gray cement of the street – just the white painted lines of the crosswalk. She is smiling to herself. Her secret game with rules she made all by herself for herself!

A month before, in South Worcester, I saw another little girl doing pretty much the same thing in her cross walk but adding a little dance to the game. Then the little boy in Main South who did the same in his crosswalk – only he would clap his hands every time he stepped onto a yellow painted line! And he’d smile! Tickled at his trick. Poverty was something to be leapt over, clapped to, danced along… 

Then you remember how you, as a little girl walked these same Worcester city streets, behind your sweet, very poor single mom. It was wintertime. Ma was always carless – didn’t even know how to drive. … You’re walking home on Lafayette Street after Ma and you and your two kid sisters have gone grocery shopping at Supreme Market on Millbury Street. It’s after a big snowstorm, and the snow plows get to the poor neighborhoods last. No matter! Your mother walks in Lafayette Street, against traffic, against and into the dirty soft snow. She’s pulling her grocery wagon behind her. It’s filled with groceries covered with plastic wrap that she got from the drycleaners she works at 60 hours a week – 40 for minimum wage, 20 under the table. She just got paid this Friday night. You giggle along with your sisters cuz you found the big tire tracks made by the big trucks going down Lafyette Street and now you have a game going home! You’re trying to walk only inside the tire tracks the big 18 wheelers have made in the snow! The tracks are wide and long. Be careful! It’s slippery! You and your sisters are trying to slide inside the thick tire tracks! The street lights give the Green Island night a pleasant yellow glow from above and make the darkened snow sparkle diamonds. Stay inside the lines! you yell to Pat and Joannie.

You don’t want to slip and lose the game – even though you do. But that’s ok because you don’t have far to go if you fall! You see it all! The snowflakes in the snow, the flowers in the dirt! Whoppee! What a game! In the snow! With Ma!!!!!!

Cece joy! If she were human – a little girl and not a little kitten – she’d join in! Back home in our third floor flat we have our own tabby kitten – Rajah! She likes to play, too! And drink from the saucer of milk our Polish granny, Bapy, sets on the floor for her. Bapy feeds her yellow pound cake, too, even though Ma scolds her and tells her not to! The cake will make Rajah sick! But it never does.

I know there are three little bags of cashews Ma bought for me and for each of my two kid sisters in Ma’s purse. Lightly salted. I smiled at the rummies at McGovern’s Package Store on Millbury Street as Ma paid for our bags of cashews. She looks so pretty in her blue wool coat and red lipstick! Just like a princess!

So lucky to be a little girl, a little kid – a Cece in this world!

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Rose and her mom under the Christmas tree, many years ago.

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One of my late mom’s fave tunes! She used to dance to it in our Green Island kitchen! (I love the video!)

Happy Holidays from the “babies” belonging to our animal rights scribe – Dorrie!

Photos and text by Dorrie Maynard:

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One of my “backyard finds,” Pumpkin.

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My dogs, Princess and Gingy.

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Buddy, lounging in his sweet suite!

I am the other half of CENTRAL MA KIBBLE KITCHEN! We go to the Mustard Seed on Piedmont Street to give out free pet food for people who are struggling and need some help feeding their pets.

Come down to the Mustard Seed if your pet needs dog or cat food OR IF YOU NEED TO SPAY OR NEUTEUR YOUR PET OR IT NEEDS VACCINATIONS.

WE WORK WITH TUFTS VETERINARY SCHOOL!

We will bring your pet to Tufts and return to the Mustard Seed for pick up.

Right now Ma Kibble Kitchen needs the following donations:

canned and dry cat food

canned dog food

Always nice: clean blankets, kitty litter, pet bowls …

Donations can be dropped off at at 139 Holden Street – the Worcester Animal Rescue League. In the 3rd garage bay.

Arrangements for pickup of large dona-
tions can be made by calling 978-496-9364.

Monetary donations are extremely helpful, and can be made securely via
Youcaring.com.

More information is at centralmakibblekitchen.org, or on their Facebook page. CMKK is 501-c3 organization, so all donations are tax deductible.

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“This holiday season be both Human and Kind!” – Dorrie

Another terrific column by Deb Young: Pets and the holidays/winter season

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Lilac, 11/21: She’s all gussied up for the holiday! Go, lil’ girl, go!!

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Cece and ceramic turkey.

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Jett: Who gives a shit? pics:R.T.

Thanksgiving is Thursday! We repost this Deb Y. column for all the cool cats and zipiddy-doo-dogs out there! Remember: Cherish the “babies”!

 – R.T.

By Deb Young

The winter season brings many occasions to celebrate and enjoy the snowy
weather.

However, it is also a time for heightened pet safety with the introduction
of seasonal plants, foods and cold weather products.

Various forms including baking chocolate Chocolate contains caffeine-like
substances, and in some forms, a high amount of fat as well. Depending on
the amount ingested, chocolate can potentially cause vomiting, increased
thirst and urination, diarrhea, hyperactivity, elevated heart rate and
seizures – and can even be lethal in large enough doses.

Preservative for the tree may contain fertilizers, which, if ingested, can
upset the stomach. Stagnant tree water can be breeding grounds for bacteria,
which can also lead to vomiting, nausea and diarrhea.

While decorations aren’t directly toxic, ribbon and tinsel can cause
gastrointestinal blockage that can be life-threatening to pets. Ornaments
can be broken or swallowed whole.

Holly, Mistletoe, Lilies and Poinsettia can be particularly harmful to your
pet. Eating Holly could produce nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. If
a dog or cat eats Mistletoe, gastrointestinal upset and possibly even
cardiovascular problems could result.

Pets should not be given holiday leftovers and garbage should be kept in an
area inaccessible to animals. Poultry bones can splinter and cause damage or
blockage in the gastrointestinal tract. Spicy or fatty foods can cause
stomach upset and could possibly lead to inflammation of the pancreas.
Additionally, moldy or spoiled foods could produce food poisoning, tremors
or seizures.

Ingestions of grapes and raisins have been associated with acute kidney
failure in dogs. Some dogs initially develop vomiting and begin drinking
large amounts of water, then subsequently develop diarrhea and
life-threatening kidney failure.

Antifreeze products containing ethylene glycol are highly toxic and can
produce life-threatening kidney damage, even in small amounts. For example,
just one tablespoon of 50-50 diluted antifreeze can be lethal to a 10-pound
cat, and as little as 4 ounces in a 20-pound dog could be fatal. Many
windshield washer products contain methanol, which if ingested can cause
drooling, vomiting, drunkenness and severe central nervous system
depression. Ice melt products may contain ingredients that can be very
irritating to the skin and gastrointestinal tract, and could also
potentially result in more severe effects including depression, weakness,
disorientation, low blood pressure, cardiac problems, seizures, coma and
even death depending on the type of ice melt and circumstances of exposure.

A few more things to remember:

Keep your pets warm and indoors. As always cats should stay inside. Since
cats left outdoors may stay warm in car wheel wells or under hoods, you
should awake any sleeping animals by rapping on your car hood before
starting the engine.

Trips outside should remain short during the winter months. While dogs need
outdoor exercise, lengthy walks can prove harmful especially when wind chill
is a factor.

Dogs should remain leashed and supervised when outdoors throughout the year.
However in the winter do not bring them near bodies of water even if they
appear frozen.

Shorthaired dogs and clipped breeds should be dressed in protective
clothing.

Wipe off your dog’s foot pads and stomach fur after returning from the
outdoors.

Outdoor shelters for pets should be dry, secure from wind and only large
enough for them to stand up, turn around and lie down. The shelter floor
should also be elevated from ground level and have dry bedding. A steady
water supply should be provided in plastic bowls and checked on so that it
does not freeze.

Pets that spend a greater amount of time outdoors also require more food.

Keeping the family pet safe during the holidays is simple if you plan ahead.

Make Halloween a treat, not a trick, for animals

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Lilac looks so frou frou in her Halloween boa…

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But wait… Lilac!!!!! No!!!!

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Jett, Rose’s brave little man, plays short stop this Halloween! pics:R.T.

By Lindsay Pollard-Post

During a recent afternoon walk, my normally easygoing canine companion, Pete, suddenly froze in his tracks. The hair on his neck shot up, and he let out a low, wary growl. It was as if he’d seen a ghost. And he had, sort of. Three of them dangled from a neighbor’s tree, their gauzy, white material rippling and dancing in the breeze. After some reassuring words, Pete decided that the specters were just a spectacle and went back to sniffing trees. But the encounter was a reminder that to animals, our Halloween festivities can be scary, indeed—and sometimes even perilous.

A parade of costumed goblins, princesses and superheroes at the door can make even the friendliest dogs and cats skittish and prone to bolting outside—or even biting a child they mistake for an intruder. Prevent real-life horror on Halloween by keeping your animals in a quiet room away from the front door during trick-or-treat time and staying with them as much as you can. The same applies if you’re hosting a bash. And do your dogs a favor: Walk them earlier in the day, before the streets fill with kids on a quest for candy—don’t drag them along trick-or-treating. They can be easily frightened by the commotion and even get loose and run off.

Always ensure that your animal companions are microchipped and wearing collars with current ID tags, just in case. But please don’t subject them to the stress of being dressed up. Many dogs and most cats feel nervous and uncomfortable when forced to wear clothes. Costumes can impair their ability to see, move and breathe, and they can even choke or strangle if they attempt to eat small parts from costumes or become entangled in them. Leave dress-up to the kids (or adults, if you’re so inclined), and let animals be their naturally adorable selves.

Decorations help set a festive mood, but they can be hazardous to curious noses and paws. Jack-o’-lanterns and candles can burn animals (and kids) or start fires if tipped over. The ink that is used in some brightly colored decorations, such as orange streamers and paper pumpkins, is toxic to animals—and swallowed balloons or party favors can block their digestive tract—so keep all these holiday accoutrements out of reach.

Many animals can’t resist sampling treats—wrappers and all—that contain toxic ingredients such as chocolate, raisins, xylitol or macadamia nuts. Keep all candies and other Halloween treats out of their reach, and make sure that kids and guests know not to share such goodies with them. If you suspect that your animal companion has swallowed something toxic, contact your veterinarian or an animal poison hotline immediately so you’ll know what to do if you see any symptoms, such as vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, not defecating or straining to defecate, agitation, increased thirst or seizures. Time is of the essence when it comes to treating for poison, so don’t delay getting to an emergency veterinarian if it seems warranted.

While most people enjoy Halloween in fun ways, real evil does lurk outside, especially this time of year. People have intentionally let dogs out of backyards, poked at them through fences and even pelted them with eggs. Black cats are unfairly associated with dark forces and frequently targeted by cruel people. Protect your animals by keeping them indoors on Halloween (and always) and letting them out for fresh air and exercise only on a leash and harness or in a safe, fenced area, under supervision. If you see stray animals, take them to an open-admission shelter or call animal control for help.

A good scare on Halloween can be fun, but no one wants to be haunted by the memory of a beloved animal companion who was sickened, injured or even killed during the festivities. Following these simple precautions will help ensure that Halloween is a treat, not a trick, for everyone.

Good dogs and their owners

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Lilac wants loads of Worcester dogparks! pics:R.T.

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So does Jett!

By Gordon Davis

The Worcester City Council will hold public hearings on the Master Plan for Dogs in what are now people parks and on dedicated doggie parks. The hearing is scheduled for this Thursday, September 15, 5:30 pm, in City Hall Chamber.

Right now no dogs are allowed in any City of Worcester park – on leash or off leash. Some people consider this regulation too restrictive. However, there are reasons that such regulations were enacted: bad doggie owners. There are good and bad doggie owners: The good doggie owners spay or neuter their dogs, keep them up to date on their vaccinations and socialize them. The bad doggie owners often don’t. Lots don’t clean up the shit that their dogs leave behind. I have lived in our house almost 40 years, and I have only seen one doggie owner clean up their doggie’s poop. Most of the time I find the doggie poop on the lawn.

I imagine that most doggie owners, when walking their dogs in City parks, will not pick up their doggies’ shit. Such people are not good doggie owners.

I also know that many people of all races are afraid of doggies. Some like we Black people have been hunted by racists and their dogs. Other people, especially children, have a natural fear of dangerous animals. Even dangerous doggies on a leash sometimes bark and acting aggressively. When a doggie is barking and acting aggressively, a good owner will make the animal heel and shorten his leash and move away from the people being frightened. Sometimes even good owners will instead argue and say “Oh, he does not bite.”

There are about 900,000 reported dog bite incidents a year in the United States. This is more than auto accidents in the United States. It is likely dog bites are under reported. There are around 700 doggie bites in Massachusetts a year!

In 1997 the City of Worcester found out it could not make all dog owners pick up their dogs’ shit. Nothing has been done to ensure that ALL of the dogs’ owners will pick up their shit this time around. This will mean unsanitary conditions in our city parks meant for people … sitting on the grass and having picnics could be a challenge.

There is no plan to stop the dogs, even with good owners, from frightening people, especially children. The people who are afraid of dogs will eventually be driven out of our parks.

I like dogs, but I think there should be a city dog park built on City of Worcester property near Coal Mine Brook. This piece of land was proposed by former Manager O’Brien to be a park with a bike path to Regatta Point. It has not been a people’s park – so people without dogs and who are uncomfortable around them will not be driven out of the area, as would be case elsewhere.

Since Coal Mine Brook will be a dog park only the dogs’ owners can easily impose a clean up your shit rule, and people without dogs will not have to put up with the doggies’ messes.

It was not that long ago the City of Worcester CLOSED Worcester swimming pools with the pretext that it did not have the money to maintain the pools. Of course the children of the city, who are increasingly Black, Hispanic and immigrants, suffered. Today the Worcester City Schools are overcrowded with up to 34 students in some classrooms. The City schools are begging people for money.

It does not make any sense now for the City of Worcester to consider building five dog-only parks at a cost of $400,000. When the Worcester Public Schools go begging?

I think one dog only park at Coal Mine Brook as a pilot would be sensible. I do not think that spending $2,000,000 on dogs, plus annual maintenance, is sensible.

It seems that Councilor Rosen, the dog owners’ champion, has failed to see the larger picture.

Keeping your dogs out of the heat – always in style!

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Lilac looks so elegant these days! She’s on a summer walk with Jett and Mama Rose.

By Lindsay Pollard-Post

Most dogs love going for walks, romping at the dog park, leaping for Frisbees or sprinting for tennis balls. But during the “dog days of summer,” when temperatures are soaring, letting dogs overexert themselves (or forcing them to) isn’t doing them any favors. In fact, it could do them in.

Dogs simply can’t handle the heat. Unlike humans, they can only cool themselves by panting and sweating through their footpads. When ambient temperatures rise above 89.5 degrees, they can’t effectively shed their body heat, and when their body temperature reaches 106 to 109 degrees, heatstroke sets in, resulting in brain damage or death. Those who are elderly, overweight or flat-faced—such as pugs, boxers, bulldogs and other breeds—are especially at risk.

Making dogs run with you while you jog or bike during hot weather can kill them—they will collapse before giving up, and by then it may be too late to save them. Even those who are used to running and in good physical shape are in danger: Last month, for example, Mojo, a K9 officer with the Arlington Police Department in Texas, reportedly became overheated while pursuing a fugitive. Despite being rushed to an animal hospital, he didn’t survive.

Hot pavement, sand and other surfaces can scorch dogs’ sensitive footpads, causing pain, burns and permanent damage, as well as reflecting heat back onto their bodies. In Arizona last month, a pit bull reportedly died of heat exhaustion while hiking on a trail in 107-degree temperatures. The dog’s guardian called the police for help, but by the time the first responders arrived, it was too late.

You can protect your dog by walking early in the morning and late at night when it’s cooler and always testing the ground with your hand—hot to the touch is too hot for Spot. Choose shady routes, and walk on the grass instead of the pavement. Carry plenty of water and stop often in the shade to rest and take a water break.

Exercise and sweltering temperatures are a deadly combination for dogs, but the ones who can’t move are just as vulnerable on summer days. Countless dogs have suffered and died of heatstroke because they were chained or penned outside with no escape from the blazing sun and blistering heat.

In July, both a puppy and an adult dog in North Carolina reportedly died after their tethers became tangled in a bush, trapping them in direct sunlight with no access to shade or water. Also last month, a Labrador retriever in Maryland reportedly died after being left on a second-story deck in 90-degree weather. According to the police, the deck’s surface was even hotter—109 degrees.

Never leave dogs outdoors unattended, especially in the heat, and if there are chained or penned dogs in your neighborhood, check on them often to ensure that they have water (in a tip-proof container) and shade (as well as food and shelter), and encourage your neighbors to let them live indoors. If they lack these basic necessities, provide them with water and notify local authorities immediately.

It should go without saying, but hot cars are also death traps for dogs. Never leave an animal (or child) in a parked car in warm weather, even for a short period of time with the windows slightly open. Dogs can succumb to heatstroke within minutes—even if the car isn’t parked in direct sunlight. If you see a dog in a hot car, ask nearby businesses to page the vehicle’s owner or call 911 immediately. If the dog appears to be in imminent danger (e.g., rapid panting, bright red tongue, dizziness, vomiting), quickly find a witness who can confirm your account if possible and then take whatever action is necessary to save the animal’s life.

During the “dog days of summer”—and always—keep your dogs safe by keeping them indoors, with air conditioning or fans running and plenty of fresh, cool water available. Special cooling mats and vests for dogs can also help keep them comfortable.

And please, spread the word: Heat kills.

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Lilac and Jett

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Two flower pics taken during our walk:

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And the newbies at Rose’s shack:

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Flower power!!!

Pics:Rose T.

Did you know the Worcester Animal Rescue League practically has a mini-store dedicated to animals?

Inside WARL! All proceeds go to help their precious babies!

Here is a bunny up for adoption:

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Some items they sell!

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Leashes, pretty collars, pup clothes, books, cards, calendars – it’s all here!

At the Worcester Animal Rescue League (WARL) at 139 Holden St., Worcester!

Open 7 days a week from noon to 4 pm

Phone: (508) 853-0030

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Rosalie says, Yeah! She got 3 of her 4 dogs at WARL!

The happy happy happy Lilac is a rescue from Tenn. Wag that tail, girl!!
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If you’re not ready for the intense commitment of owning a dog, buy some stuff at WARL, and that way you can still help Worcester’s homeless pups and kitties!

Thank YOU!

Pics/text: Rosalie Tirella

I visited the Worcester Animal Rescue League today! They have the cutest tees!

Buy one today and help Worcester’s homeless pups and kitties!

They’re located at 139 Holden St., Worcester!

Open 7 days a week from noon to 4 pm

Phone: (508) 853-0030

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Long-sleeved, too, for chilly summer eves:
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These babies need homes:

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Please! Open your heart – to all animals, great and itty bitty!

Visit WARL’s website: worcesterarl.org

Pics/text: Rosalie Tirella