Tag Archives: Main South

Tonight, at Clark U and … It’s time to end Canada’s bloody seal slaughter

Personal Secretary Ferial Govashiri, Sept. 12, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza) Personal Secretary Ferial Govashiri, Sept. 12, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

TONIGHT!
CLARK UNIVERSITY
950 MAIN ST.

WHO: Ferial Govashiri, President Obama’s former personal aide

WHAT: Lecture, sponsored by the Clark University Speakers’ Forum

WHEN: Tonight, Monday, April 24

WHERE: Jefferson 320, Clark University Campus, Worcester

Ms. Ferial Govashiri will reflect on a decade of her career alongside one of the world’s most powerful leaders, and will speak about the importance of identifying your passion and working hard to achieve your goals.

Govashiri is an Iranian-American political aide who has served as the personal aide to United States President Barack Obama since 2014.

She worked on then-Senator Barack Obama’s campaign, beginning in the summer of 2007 in his Chicago headquarters in the department of Scheduling and Advance.

Govashiri went on to work in the White House after the election. She is an active member of the Iranian American Women Foundation and has spoken at conferences on their behalf.

For the first five years of the Obama administration, Govashiri worked on the National Security Council (NSC), first as a Senior Advisor to Ben Rhodes, the Deputy National Security Advisor and then as the Senior Advisor to the Chief of Staff and the Director of Visits at the NSC.

She helped plan the President’s foreign trips as well as foreign leaders’ visits to the White House.

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IT’S TIME TO END CANADA’S BLOODY SEAL SLAUGHTER

By Danielle Katz

This year marks Canada’s 150th birthday, but as it prepares to celebrate, a dark cloud hangs over the festivities: the bloodbath that takes place off the East Coast every year.

I’m talking about Canada’s commercial seal slaughter, which began earlier this month. As you read this, baby seals are likely being shot to death or bludgeoned with hakapiks, deadly hooked clubs with a sharp metal tip.

Canada’s commercial seal slaughter is the largest mass killing of marine mammals on Earth, and it has become a stain on the country’s international reputation.

If we want this year’s to be the last one, every kind person must rally.

Thanks to sustained activism by PETA and others, we are close to ending it, but that’s little consolation to the tens of thousands of baby seals who will still be killed this year.

Sealers object to calling these animals “babies,” of course, but that’s exactly what they are. Many are slaughtered before they’ve even eaten their first solid meal or learned how to swim. While sealers are not allowed to kill “whitecoats,” the infants with the iconic fluffy white fur, they are permitted to do so as soon as the fur is shed, when the pups are only about 3 weeks of age.

Most are killed when they’re between 3 weeks and 3 months old.

These babies are defenseless and have no escape from the violence that rains down on them. Eyewitnesses have seen weeks-old pups shot in the face and wounded pups left to choke on their own blood as sealers rushed to attack the next fleeing victim. This horrific spectacle is repeated again and again on Canada’s ice floes every spring, and for what? For fur, a frivolous product that no one needs or even wants.

All major markets for seal fur have closed, including in the U.S., the E.U. and Russia. Effective April 1, Switzerland became the 35th country to ban imports of seal-derived products. And despite a marketing blitz that has cost Canadian taxpayers millions, China—where PETA Asia is active—has shown little interest in buying seal skins or meat.

In desperation, the industry is now trying to revive the trade in seal penises, dubiously marketing them as aphrodisiacs.

One by one, Canada’s excuses for continuing to defend the slaughter are disappearing. The commercial East Coast slaughter is not a subsistence activity but rather an off-season venture that enables a few small fishing villages to earn some pocket change.

When you factor in costs such as deploying the Coast Guard for several weeks each year to break up ice and rescue stranded sealers, flying delegations around the world to try to fight bans on seal fur, activist surveillance and funding the seal-hunt bureaucracy, the seal slaughter actually costs Canadian taxpayers millions of dollars every year.

And while commercial fishers have long scapegoated harp seals for diminishing cod populations, a scientist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada says that the evidence for this claim is lacking. To the contrary, cod and seal populations have both grown over the last 10 years, according to John Brattey, who believes the seals actually prefer eating other types of fish. “We often find that seals are blamed for a lot of things,” he says.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has tackled many social issues since taking office. Now, he has another opportunity to offer help to others who desperately need it: baby seals.

Please take a moment to urge Prime Minister Trudeau to lift the cloud darkening Canada’s anniversary celebrations by ending federal subsidies of the commercial seal slaughter. (Visit PETA.org to find out how.) Then use your social media accounts to help spread the word and get more people involved. Together, we can help make 2017 the year that this cruel massacre is brought to an end.

The Boys and Girls Club of Worcester – feeding our kids!💛

Childhood Hunger Rate in Worcester Higher than the National Average

The Boys & Girls Club of Worcester Serves Kids a FREE Dinner 5 Nights a Week

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Steve “Tank” Tankinow, the Kid’s Café Director💜💙💛

We don’t need to search very far for statistics on childhood hunger:

1 in 4 kids goes to bed hungry in Worcester.

That’s higher than the national average of 1 in 5.

Childhood hunger is linked to lasting effects on our kids’ social development, physical health, and academic performance.

In fact, 93% of educators are concerned about the long-term damage hunger can have on our youth.

When children are hungry:

88% are unable to concentrate in school

87% struggle with lack of energy or motivation

65% exhibit behavioral problems

84% have overall poor academic performance

Often times, the foods they have access to pose no nutritional value.

80% of our Club members live at or below the poverty level, limiting their exposure to fresh, healthy foods. The financial limitations on our families force parents to serve fast food or processed and packaged meals.

Our Club is the only place in the city where kids can receive a FREE, nutritious dinner 5 days a week.

Kid’s Café provides approximately 300 youth a day with nutritious meals.

Steve “Tank” Tankinow, our Kid’s Café Director, has been cooking home-style meals for our members for over 17 years, dedicating himself to serving the hungry children in Worcester.

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Eating good food at the Club💜💛

If you’re interested in helping our Club provide dinner 5 nights a week for our kids, please consider making a donation!

How it all Began:

Tank’s Story:

“I’ve been a member of the Boys & Girls Club since I was a kid. To me, it was a safe place. I always felt at home. When I came back as an adult, the sounds and even the smells were the same as I remembered as a kid.

I was inspired to start Kid’s Café as a way of giving back to the community. Because my career has been involved in nutrition, I wanted to do something that provided good, healthy food for kids. I worked with the Worcester County Food Bank and the Boys & Girls Club, and formed a non-profit organization. We started by making supper for a handful of kids 17 years ago; now we feed about 300 kids a hot, nutritious meal 2 days a week (3 days a week we are provided meals through the Federal Government). We’re helping keep kids healthy. It’s an important part of the mission of the Boys & Girls Club.

I’ve been fortunate that so many people have volunteered to help, or responded when I called. We’ve had everyone from executives to high school students contributing food or money to buy food. They pitch in as teams to cook and serve. It’s a lot of work to feed 300 kids, but with the community support we always get it done.”- Steven “Tank” Tankinow (excerpt from alumni profile in 2011 annual report)

Fallon Health Opens Food Pantry at Our Club

We’re thrilled to provide our kids with nutritious food while at the Club, but we also want to ensure their health at home.

Fallon Health has opened a food pantry at our Harrington Clubhouse to help our organization further fight childhood hunger.

This crucial addition to our case management department will provide Club families with food and resources during tough times and emergencies such as a death in the family or unemployment.

Several Fallon Health employees volunteered their time to set up the pantry and stock the new shelves with non-perishable items such as canned vegetables, pasta, and cereal.

The pantry will be restocked throughout the year to ensure we can continue assisting our families. The generosity of Fallon Health has enabled our staff to help our families in a new and pivotal capacity.

If you’re interested in donating to our food pantry, please contact Liz Hamilton, Executive Director, at:

Boys & Girls Club of Worcester
65 Tainter Street, Worcester, MA, 01610-2520, United States
www.bgcworcester.org

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Clark U news …

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This Friday! March 31

Free Screening and Discussion of Award-Winning Doc ‘The Case
of the Three Sided Dream’ at Clark University

Clark University will host a free screening of the documentary Rahsaan Roland Kirk: The Case of the Three Sided Dream this Friday, March 31, at 7 p.m. in Razzo Hall, 92 Downing St.

There will be a discussion with the film’s director, Adam Kahan, immediately following.

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Adam Kahan

This event is free and open to the public.

The film is the story of multi-instrumentalist Rahsaan Roland Kirk who went from blind infant, to child prodigy, to adult visionary, to political activist and finally to paralyzed showman who played until the day he died from stroke in 1977 at age 42.

Since its world premiere in 2014 at the South By Southwest Film Festival (SXSW), the film has garnered rave reviews including praise for Director Kahan and a renewed respect for Kirk, who Jimi Hendrix once described as “a stone cold blues musician.”

Rahsaan Roland Kirk: The Case of the Three Sided Dream, an official selection of the 2014 Full Frame Documentary Film Festival and the 2015 Big Sky International Film Festival, took home Best Documentary honors at the Pan African Film Festival and Soundtrack Cologne, both in 2015.

Jazz Times calls Kirk, “an artist who fiercely asserted both his creativity and his personhood while pushing against two characteristics [blindness and blackness] society would use to diminish him in any way it could.”

“My purpose,” Kahan told Esquire last year, “was really to celebrate Rahsaan Roland Kirk and his legacy, which is largely as a musician and performer.”

Kahan added, “He was a presence, and I wanted his presence to be on screen, above and beyond anyone else, playing his music and telling his story in his own words.”

In making his film, Kahan eschewed the usual documentary format, which might include musicologists and historians, in favor of a more “impressionistic and organic film.”

For more information, please visit: www.rahsaanfilm.com.

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Clark University professor’s new book examines what it means to ‘become American’

The New Americans’ examines immigration policy, focuses on protests and experiences of five Latino national origin groups

In 2006, millions of Latinos mobilized across the United States to protest far-reaching immigration legislation that would have criminalized undocumented immigrants and anyone who helped them enter or stay in the U.S. In her new book, Clark University political science professor Heather Silber Mohamed suggests that these unprecedented protests marked a major milestone for the Latino population — one that is even more relevant today with the immigration debate back in the forefront of American politics.

“The New Americans?: Immigration, Protest, and the Politics of Latino Identity” illuminates questions at the heart of American political culture: specifically, what does it mean to “become” American? Silber Mohamed focuses on the 2006 immigration marches. Taking advantage of a unique natural experiment, her research uses survey data to examine how protest and the immigration debate can influence Latinos’ sense of belonging in the U.S.

In her book, Silber Mohamed charts major developments in US immigration policy over the last 50 years, and explores the varied historical experiences of the five largest Latino national origin groups currently in the US— Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Salvadorans and Dominicans.

She provides in-depth analysis of the Latino population, particularly in response to the politics of immigration. This nuanced study yields important insights for understanding the ongoing debate over immigration reform and the extent to which it will unify this diverse population.

Silber Mohamed spent six years working on Capitol Hill in both the Senate and the House of Representatives. The combination of her personal background (her father’s family fled Fidel Castro’s dictatorship in Cuba) and her policy experience contributed to her academic preoccupation with the effects of political debate on Latino attitudes and incorporation.

“I find that the distinct message (‘We Are America’) advanced by the Latino community during the 2006 protests led group members to think differently about what it means to be American,” said Silber Mohamed. “For some Latinos, the protests in 2006 increased their sense of belonging in the US. These events contrast sharply with today’s political environment in which inflammatory rhetoric about immigrants and heightened deportations are increasingly forcing immigrants into the shadows.”

Silber Mohamed finds that the 2006 protests were empowering for immigrants. Yet, she notes that the current political environment may instead lead to fear and mistrust, even among some Latino U.S. citizens.

Deborah Schildkraut, author of “Americanism in the Twenty-First Century: Public Opinion in the Age of Immigration,” says the book “raises important normative questions about the conditions that promote a sense of belonging in an increasingly diverse United States.” Tomás R. Jiménez, author of “Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity,” calls it “a must read for anyone hoping to understand politics in America today.”

“The New Americans” expands on an article Silber Mohamed published in the American Politics Research in 2013. She has also published research in Latino Politics En Ciencia Politica and Politics, Groups, and Identities. She has been on the Clark faculty since 2013, and is affiliated with the Latin American and Latino Studies concentration and the program in Women’s and Gender Studies.

From Clark U …

Martin, Atyia
Dr. Atyia S. Martin

Clark University
950 Main St.

FREE!

March 21 at Clark U: Boston’s first Chief Resilience Officer to give lecture on ‘environmental racism’

Clark University will host “Environmental Racism: Identifying and Combating Injustice in our Communities and Beyond,” a talk by emergency preparedness expert Dr. Atyia S. Martin and community organizer Rushelle Frazier at 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 21, in the Higgins Lounge, Dana Commons, Clark University campus.

Mayor Martin J. Walsh appointed Dr. Martin as Boston’s first Chief Resilience Officer in August 2015. The goal of Dr. Martin’s two-year position, which is funded by the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities program, is to look at how ongoing issues like income inequality, a lack of affordable housing, poverty and racism could play a role in recovery from a disaster.

She is developing a resilience strategy for Boston and leading a city-wide effort to help Boston prepare for, withstand and recover from disasters such as floods, infrastructure failure and terrorism in addition to her focus on addressing social and economic issues.

Dr. Martin previously served as the director of the Office of Public Health Preparedness at the Boston Public Health Commission. She is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and has worked for the FBI and National Security Agency.

She has also taught in the Master of Homeland Security program at Northeastern University.

Rushelle Frazier is a queer black feminist writer, permaculture educator, urban farmer, counselor and organizer. She is a member of the 2015 Worcester Slam Team and co-coordinator of Choice Words Poetry Series. Frazier uses her passion for poetry and writing as a vehicle for justice and education, and has organized the Worcester Youth Spoken Word since 2015 and is the co-originator of the Dirty Gerund Poetry Show. She is also founder of Neighborhood Botanicals, a Worcester-based company that provides herbal education and related products and services.

This free, public talk is sponsored by the Clark Sustainability Collaborative and Black Student Union.

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Freund
Dr. Richard A. Freund

Clark U. to host lecture by archaeologist who discovered hidden Holocaust escape tunnel in Lithuania, March 30

Clark University will host “Escape from the Holocaust: Geoscience and Archaeology,” a lecture by esteemed American archaeologist Dr. Richard A. Freund, at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 30, in the Grace Conference Room, first floor of the Higgins University Center, 950 Main Street, Worcester.

This free, public lecture is sponsored by the The David H. ’65 and Edith Chaifetz Endowed Fund for Jewish Studies.

In this talk, Professor Freund will discuss his recent work in Vilna, Lithuania, where he and an excavation team used electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) technology to uncover an escape tunnel which had been hidden for 70 years. The 100-foot tunnel, which was found between five and nine feet below the surface, had been dug over the course of 76 days by 80 prisoners using spoons and other small tools. On the last night of Passover in 1944, the prisoners attempted the escape the tunnel; only 11 survived. Professor Freund’s team also uncovered a previously unknown mass burial pit next to the tunnel which may hold the remains of thousands of people.

Professor Freund is the Maurice Greenberg Professor of Jewish History and the director of the Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Hartford. His books “Digging Through the Bible” (2009) and “Digging Through History” (2016) have unearthed questions about the past, including the Bible, the lost island of Atlantis, and the Holocaust.

Freund’s discovery made international headlines last year. Professor Freund and his colleagues worked on a “Nova” documentary on this discovery, “Holocaust Escape Tunnel,” which will premiere on PBS on April 19.

Tomorrow! Thursday, Feb. 16: Talk at Clark U to explore dark humor in contemporary African American art

Barber, Tiffany
Tiffany E. Barber

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Absolutely Hilarious, 1997. Peter Williams (born 1952). Oil on canvas.

Clark University
950 Main St.

FREE TO ALL!

Clark University will host “Dark Humor and the African Image,” a lecture by curator Tiffany E. Barber, at 7 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 16, in the Higgins Lounge in Dana Commons.

This free, public event is part of the Higgins School of Humanities’ spring symposium, “What’s So Funny?” as well as the on-going African American Intellectual Culture Series.

Barber will talk about how African American artists use satire, visual puns, farce, absurdity, kitsch, and the bizarre to present reverent, positive images of blackness in order to counteract the experience of slavery and racism.

She will draw upon her recent exhibition, “Dark Humor: African American Art from the University of Delaware,” to consider the significance of humor in contemporary art. She will discuss how black artists such as Camille Billops, David Hammons, Barkley Hendricks, and Peter Williams employ subversive humor to question the currency of cultural and racial stereotypes.

Barber is a scholar, curator, and writer of twentieth and twenty-first century visual art and performance with a focus on artists of the black diaspora living and working in the United States.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Office of the Provost, and the Department of Visual Performing Arts.

At Clark U in Main South: What’s so funny?!😄😂😜

But first …

From Bill Maher:

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Clark University’s Higgins School of Humanities’ spring dialogue symposium asks ‘What’s so funny?’

Lectures, exhibits and films examine how humor connects and divides

This spring, Clark University’s Higgins School for Humanities presents “What’s so funny?” a symposium that comprises lectures, community conversations and exhibits on humor.

“Our symposium asks how humor creates and fragments communities. What larger cultural, social, and political role does humor play? In short, what can we learn when we take jokes, comedy, and laughter seriously?” wrote Amy Richter, director of the Higgins School of Humanities.

All events listed below are FREE TO ALL and will be held on the Clark University campus:

Lecture

“The Science of Laughter”
7 p.m.
Wednesday, February 1
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
British neuroscientist and stand-up comedian Sophie Scott (University College London) will discuss the sometimes surprising science and evolution of laughter—an emotion with its roots in play and social bonding. She will explore questions such as: How and why do humans laugh? What do brain studies reveal about laughter? What happens when laughter goes wrong? This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Frances L. Hiatt School of Psychology at Clark.

Lecture and exhibition

“Cartooning; Sense, Nonsense, Applications”
4 p.m.
Tuesday, February 7
Exhibition runs from Tuesday, Feb. 7, through Monday, May 22
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Cartoonists James Sturm and Caleb Brown will look beyond graphic novels and iconic characters to emphasize cartooning’s ability to communicate complex information quickly and effectively, share powerful and precise visual narratives, and engage readers of all ages, nationalities, and socio-economic backgrounds.
Sturm, cofounder of The Center for Cartoon Studies, will curate an accompanying exhibit on “applied cartooning.” The selected images will highlight the ways the medium itself is being used to innovate and problem-solve in medicine, business, education, and other fields.
This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, Difficult Dialogues, and the Media, Culture and the Arts Program.

Lecture

“Dark Humor and the African American Image”
7 p.m.
Thursday, February 16
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Scholar and curator Tiffany E. Barber will draw upon her recent exhibition, “Dark Humor: African American Art from the University of Delaware,” to consider the significance of humor in contemporary art. Barber will discuss how contemporary black artists, such as Camille Billops, David Hammons, Barkley Hendricks, and Peter Williams, employ subversive humor to question the currency of cultural and racial stereotypes.
This event is part of the African American Intellectual Culture Series, and is cosponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Office of the Provost, and the Department of Visual and Performing Arts.

Talk and book signing

“Light in the Dark: A Talk on Writing and Humor”
7p.m.
Thursday, February 23
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Is it possible to fake your own death in the twenty-first century? With six figures of student loan debt, author Elizabeth Greenwood was tempted to find out. She set off on a foray into the world of death fraud, where for $30,000 a consultant can make you disappear, possibly forever. Greenwood will read from her book “Playing Dead: A Journey Through the World of Death Fraud” (2016), and introduce us to men and women desperate enough to lose their identities—and their families—to begin again. She will lead a discussion on the role of humor in illuminating and exploring our darkest impulses. A book signing will follow. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Writing Center.

Lecture and book signing

“BALLS: It Takes Some to Get Some”
7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 1
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
For Chris Edwards, a former advertising creative director, changing his gender from female to male took balls…and a damn good sense of humor. How did he find the courage to come out at a company board meeting of white, middle-aged executives; to endure 28 painful and extensive surgeries; or to show up at his 10-year high school reunion? Edwards will read from his funny and poignant memoir “BALLS: It Takes Some to Get Some” (2016), and share how humor helped him re-brand himself and gain acceptance from his family, friends, and colleagues at a time when the word “transgender” was almost non-existent.
A book signing will follow. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Women’s and Gender Studies Program.

Workshop

“The Truth is Funny: An Improvisation Workshop”
7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 15
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
“The truth is funny. Honest discovery, observation, and reaction is better than contrived invention.” The words of actor Del Close have inspired countless improvisational comics. In this workshop, Dan Balel (Theater) and Gino DiIorio (Theater) will lead us in theater games and improvisation exercises to develop trust, reveal truths, and generate laughs.
This event is cosponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Theatre Arts Program.

Film Screening and Discussion

“’THE LAST LAUGH’; A Film Screening and Discussion”
7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 21
Jefferson Academic Center, Room 320
“THE LAST LAUGH,” a feature documentary by Ferne Pearlstein, proceeds from the premise that the Holocaust would seem to be an absolutely off-limits topic for comedy. But is it? History shows that even the victims of the Nazi concentration camps used humor as a means of survival and resistance. Still, any hint of comedy in connection with this horror risks diminishing the suffering of millions. So where is the line? If we make the Holocaust off limits, what are the implications for other controversial subjects— 9/11, AIDS, racism—in a society that prizes freedom of speech? Valerie Sperling (Holocaust and Genocide Studies/Political Science) and Amy Richter (History) will facilitate a conversation after the film.
This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program, and Screen Studies.

Lecture

“Brother Jonathan Runs for President: American Humor, Vernacular Values, and the Rise of Trump”
7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 28
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Challenges to America’s most sacred myths fuel the traditions of vernacular humor, which asserts faith in ordinary Americans and mistrust of elites. Spoof presidential campaigns by ostensibly ordinary citizens—heirs of Brother Jonathan, folklore’s quintessential American—have mocked the ideological contradictions of presidential campaigns whose vernacular values nonetheless yield elite results.

Professor Judith Yaross Lee (Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University) will consider how nearly 200 years of spoof campaigns in cartoon, video, newspaper features, and other formats highlight values and visions always at stake in the presidential race, but especially in the candidacy of Donald Trump. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Department of History, and the Bland Fund of the Department of Political Science.

Tina Z. 🎋 parked here … WE HOPE TINA RUNS FOR CITY COUNCIL! – nice showing last election cycle, Tina!🎉🎉

HOME …

Artists: Joan Baldwin, Nina Bellucci, Joan Benotti, Jennifer Day, Jenna DeLuca, Matthew Dickey, Erin Diebboll, Gary Duehr, Kevin Frances, Jan Johnson, Kelly Anona Kerrigan, Carol McMahon, Evan Morse, Chelsea Revelle, Soha Saghazadeh, Brittany Severance, Dawn Southworth

Exhibition Dates: January 17 – February 26, 2017

Exhibition locations: Schiltkamp Gallery, Traina Center for the Arts,

Clark University – 92 Downing St.

Gallery Hours: Monday -Thursday, 9-9 / Friday, 9-4 / Saturday & Sunday, 12-5

Opening reception: Wednesday January 25, 4:30 – 6

Gallery Talk with Artists:Thursday, February 9, 12-1

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The word “home” can have myriad associations for each person, but on a broad archetypal level, home conjures the realm of domestic life, a household with various members, a secure dwelling, private space, and a place of sanctuary and refuge.

Home also can be seen as existing in concentric circles – the initial ring being that which encircles the individual and members of a household most closely – whether it be a private house, communal residence, apartment, dormitory, or temporary shelter – followed by larger circles of “hometown” and ever expanding associations with region, nationality, and identity.

To “feel at home” suggests a sense of belonging and comfort. But, of course, it is quite possible not to feel at home in one’s actual domicile or physical location and the concept of home may feel elusive or precarious depending on life circumstances, geography, and politics. The artists in this exhibition offer various perspectives on this universal longing for “home” – the quest for a sense of safety, peace, acceptance, and well-being.

Some of the work confronts issues of displacement and loss, while other pieces depict the simple pleasures of domestic life and the careful construction of personal space.

The potency of everyday objects and the memories they trigger are also a focus of investigation. And a few of these artists play on sentimental or cliché associations of home. Though the stories are often personal, the themes are universal.

This was a juried show in response to an open call. The artists included come from all over New England and range from graduate student to well-established and renowned professional.

This exhibition was curated and installed by the students in ARTS 296 Gallery Culture and Practice, a “problems of practice” course, in which students explore opportunities to connect what they learn in the classroom with issues and matters faced by professionals working beyond the campus.

Those students are: Madison Boardman, Maria Escobar Pardo, Katlyn Greger, Grant Henry, Celine Hunt, Autumn Perez, Aliyah Rawat, F. N. U. Rouran, Andrea Schuster, Andre Toribio, and Amy Yeager.

‘Home Grown: Cultivating the next generation of urban farmers’

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pics:Rose Tirella

Clark U, 950 Main St.

7 p.m.

Nov. 9

FREE TO ALL!

Clark University to host agricultural expert for ‘Home Grown: Cultivating the next generation of urban farmers,’ Nov. 9

Clark University will host “Home Grown: Cultivating the Next Generation of Urban Farmers,” a lecture by agricultural expert Jennifer Hashley, at 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 9, in the Higgins Lounge in Dana Commons.

Demand for fresh, locally-grown food close to urban centers is increasing. In this lecture, Hashley will present her strategies for raising the next generation of environmentally responsible farmers.

Hashley has spent more than 15 years in the field of sustainable agriculture. She is the director of the New Entry Sustainable Farming Project at Tufts University’s Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, and has helped transform New Entry into a nationally recognized farmer training program. She is responsible for the overall strategic direction and management of the organization that includes three incubator training farms, horticultural, livestock, and farm business training courses, a food hub (World PEAS), and several national -scale, capacity-building programs for beginning farmers and food security efforts.

Hashley is also an agricultural business instructor for the Mass. Department of Agricultural Resources and serves on the boards and steering committees of multiple agricultural organizations. She has earned numerous leadership awards for her food systems work, and has been selected as an Environmental Leadership Fellow and an Eisenhower Agriculture Fellow. In 2003, she and her husband, a full-time vegetable farmer, started Pete and Jen’s Backyard Birds, a diversified pasture-based livestock operation. This year, they relocated their farm to Lincoln, Mass., where they manage Codman Community Farms.

This free, public event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Department of Economics and the George Perkins Marsh Institute.

It is part of the Higgins School’s Fall 2016 series “Home (De)Constructed,” which explores what “home” truly means.

Main South! Always in style! … Oct. 13 – tomorrow! – opening of new Kilby-Gardner-Hammond Athletic Field and Track!

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This lovely duplex is just one example of the the glorious Gardner-Kilby-Hammond urban renewal project! pic: Ron O’Clair

Boys & Girls Club kids will inaugurate field with soccer ‘kickoff’!

The Main South Community Development Corporation, the Boys & Girls Club of Worcester and Clark University will celebrate the completion of a new field and track with a dedication beginning at 3:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 13, at 65 Tainter St.

Opening the new field marks the culmination of the Kilby-Gardner-Hammond project, begun in the late 1990s. The project so far comprises more than 100 new housing units, the $9.2 million Boys & Girls Club, and the new, $3 million field and track. This facility will be used by Clark University for intercollegiate, club, intramural, and recreation sports. It will also be shared with the Boys and Girls Club, giving the young people there an essential outdoor play space.

Congressman Jim McGovern will join the ceremonies on Thursday, along with Stephen Teasdale, Executive Director of the Main South CDC; David Angel, President of Clark University; and Liz Hamilton, Executive Director of the Boys & Girls Club of Worcester.

“This new field and track will expand access to green spaces for local families and give kids new opportunities for outdoor recreation and positive afterschool activities,” Congressman McGovern said. “The successful completion of this project is another strong step toward a rejuvenated Main South. I was proud to help bring federal dollars back to our district to invest in the bike path around the track and I am grateful to work with such great partners in the City, Clark University, the Boys and Girls Club and the Main South Community Development Corporation to help us revitalize this neighborhood. Together we are building a strong and vibrant community for all of our families.”

“This field represents just the latest in a long history of successful partnering between Clark and our neighbors in Main South,” President Angel said. “The investments of our community along with city, state and federal agencies, private investment and development firms have resulted in a successful revitalization project sure to benefit all.”

“We’re thrilled to cut the ribbon and officially help Clark University open their new collegiate field, located next to our Harrington Clubhouse,” writes Hamilton. “This field will create opportunities for our kids we’ve never been able to provide in the past. We’re extremely appreciative of Clark for allowing our Club to utilize the field to offer sports such as snow-shoeing, lacrosse, track, and flag football.”

After officials finish their remarks, they plan to toss and kick soccer balls onto the new field for the club kids to “kick off” the new playing field.

The field and track project is another in a series of collaborations between the Main South CDC, the city, federal and state government and Clark University to revitalize Main South.

At the YWCA … Abby’s House and Our Story Edutainment … Tom Petty … and more!

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Abby’s House and Our Story Edutainment present Love Shouldn’t Hurt

Spoken Word and Lyrics

In Honor and Remembrance of Victims and Survivors of Domestic Violence

When: Wednesday, October 19

Where: Worcester Public Library

Time: 7 pm – 8 pm

Please join us for an evening of caring and remembrance as Worcester’s finest
poets and singers Honor victims and Celebrate survivors of Domestic Violence.

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Oct. 20 at Clark University, 950 Main St. …

Tom Petty biographer talks about men’s emotion in rock music

Clark University presents “Men, Masculinities and Emotion in Rock and Roll,” a conversation with Warren Zanes, author of “Petty: the Biography,” and executive director of the Rock and Roll Forever Foundation, beginning at 7 p.m., Oct. 20, in the Daniels Theater at Atwood Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

Zanes’ book about Petty, released in late 2015, has been hailed as a masterpiece in biography, revealing “an X-ray of the most fragile, most volatile, and most sublime social unit ever invented: the rock-and-roll band. The alliances, the distortions, the deep bruises and the absurd elations that can never be explained to an outsider” (Journalist/author Stephen Dubner).

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Warren Zanes

Zanes, who has taught at several U.S. universities, also was vice president at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. His writing subjects range from Jimmy Rogers to Dusty Springfield, to the Willburn Brothers to the History of Warner Bros. Records. Additionally, Zanes made three records with the 1980s rock and roll band the Del Fuegos and three as a solo artist.

Michael Addis, professor in the Department of Psychology at Clark University, organized the talk and will serve as moderator. Addis is director of the Research Group on Men’s Well-Being. He is an expert on men’s help seeking, masculinity, depression and men’s health issues, and is the author of “Invisible Men: Men’s Inner Lives and the Consequences of Silence.”

“Rock and blues music is one of the only places in popular culture where men reveal pure emotional vulnerability, although it’s often hidden in layers of anger and other more hypermasculine ways of expressing pain.” ~ Michael Addis

“Warren Zanes is a true polymath; accomplished musician, author, professor of visual and cultural arts … We are very fortunate, and very excited, to have him visit Clark,” noted Addis.

Addis, a musician himself, described his connection with Zanes: “Over the last ten years I have been using Tom Petty’s music and lyrics regularly in my psychology of men and masculinity and psychology of music classes. When I read Warren’s recent biography on Petty I was so impressed with it that I contacted him immediately and found out not only that he had a connection with Clark (the Del Fuegos were Boston-Based and played at Clark in the ‘80s), but also that he was interested in the psychology of music, and in the issues of silence and invisibility in musician’s lives – something I had written about extensively in my book, ‘Invisible Men.’ ”

The talk is sponsored by the Frances L. Hiatt School of Psychology at Clark University.

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Today! REC FARMERS MARKET AT BEAVER BROOK PARK – ACROSS FROM FOLEY STADIUM, Chandler Street!

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MAIN SOUTH! Tomorrow! SATURDAY!

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And …

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FREE FOR ALL SCHOOL TEACHERS! How to implement suicide prevention programs in their schools

We are hosting a few trainings across Massachusetts for middle and high school staff.

The training teaches schools basic suicide prevention knowledge and how to implement and evidence-based suicide prevention program in their school.

The training is free and gives attendees the opportunity to get the program for free.

This is a half-day training appropriate for any school staff or community members who will implement the SOS program or provide gatekeeper training.

Topics include:

· Warning signs, risk factors, and symptoms of depression and suicide in youth

· How to respond to youth at risk

· SOS Signs of Suicide Prevention Program implementation best practices

· How to talk safely to teens about suicide

· Training adults in your communities and schools to support at-risk youth in seeking help

· Tips on breaking down barriers to youth suicide prevention and action steps

As you may know, Massachusetts passed legislation that encourages school personnel to receive training on suicide prevention.

Staff who attend this training will be prepared to return to their schools and deliver suicide prevention gatekeeper training to all staff.

North Central Massachusetts – October 19 – Gardner

In partnership, the Montachusett Suicide Prevention Taskforce and SMH invite your staff to a training at Heywood Hospital in Gardner.

This training is provided free of charge thanks to the support of Massachusetts Department of Public Health

Western Massachusetts – Date TBD – Location TBD
This training is provided free of charge thanks to the support of Massachusetts Department of Public Health

Southern Massachusetts – Date TBD – Raynham MA
In partnership, Bristol County Suicide Prevention Coalition and SMH invite your staff to a training at the First Congressional Church of Raynham. Date and time TBD.
This training is provided free of charge thanks to the support of the Makayla Fund

To learn more about the trainings, feel free to contact Chelsea Biggs at cbiggs@mentalhealthscreening.org.