Tag Archives: Spay and neuter your cats and dogs

Caring about homeless pets – always in style! Today! Sat., April 22! ๐ŸŒผNow until 2 p.m.๐ŸŒบ๐Ÿ’™ The WARL kitten๐Ÿฏ๐Ÿฑ shower!๐Ÿ’•

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Rose’s Cece was so tiny not so long ago! She’s a big girl now! The vet said kittens gain one pound per month as they grow into adulthood! pics: R.T.

Cece was a rescue! Here’s Miss Cece๐Ÿ’›, this morn, all feisty and cute!๐ŸŒบ:

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Adorable, spoiled grrrl!๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ’™

At today’s WARL KITTEN SHOWER …

… You can cuddle some kittens who will need homes soon! Volunteer to foster-parent a litter – or 2!?!!

In a few weeks WARL will be inundated with kittens! The staff call the kitty tsunami KITTEN SEASON; there are lots of people who STILL DON’T GET IT and do not spay their female cats. The result? ย Hundreds of kittens who need loving forever homes. Millions end up in animal shelters. Thousands are “put ย down” annually.

At WARL, a no-kill animal shelter, the staff diligently works to meet the kittens’ – babies! – special needs. Dry kitten food, pate cat food, ย liquid kitten formula, little toys … all unique to lil’ kitties.

Admission to the WARL kitten shower is a kitty donation!๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ’›

WARL ASKS YOU FOR THE FOLLOWING GIFTS:

๐Ÿฏ Canned PATE cat food!

๐Ÿบ Non-clumping clay litter

๐Ÿฑ DRY KITTEN food

๐Ÿฏ TOY MICE!

Visit this a.m. or afternoon!

They are located at 139 Holden St, Worcester.

Their phone #: 508-853-0030

Their website:ย https://worcesterarl.org

Their hours:

Saturday 12โ€“4PM
Sunday 12โ€“4PM
Monday 12โ€“4PM
Tuesday 12โ€“4PM
Wednesday 12โ€“4PM
Thursday 12โ€“4PM
Friday 12โ€“4PM

– R.T.

Human Kind – be both!

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Dorrie๐Ÿฑ๐Ÿถ๐Ÿฏ๐Ÿฐ๐Ÿต๐Ÿป๐Ÿผ๐Ÿ’!

By Dorrie Maynard

Here’s a feel-good story for you: It’s about a woman who helped save and trap two of the luckiest feral kittens in Worcester!

The woman’s name is Melissa and the two (twin?)sister kittens are named Daisy and Delilah. They are completely black and precious!

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Daisy and Delilah!

They were born outside, in the elements, and now live the life of kitty royalty. Melissa had owned a cat years ago, but for a very long time, after it died, she never got another one until she saw these kittens, homeless and helpless, in her backyard.

She got in touch with me. We set live traps in her yard. There were originally four kitties: one must have been taken in by someone else, and one of the others had died right before Melissa was going to take her in. Melissa was devastated but determined to save the two remaining kittens.

Like all feral kittens – kittens born to feral cats and are unused to human contact – these babies were afraid of humans and being inside Melussa’s home at first. But Melissa showed them love, fed and cared for them. They came around!

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Now they are HOME! They have complete run of Melissa’s house, every cat toy, cat comfort, the best of food and cat parents who couldn’t be happier with their cuties.

Not only did Melissa and her husband take in these two kittens, they helped me to trap and transport eight other cats in the neighborhood to be spayed/neutered and vaccinated and then to be re-released in the neighborhood, where they could be as healthy as possible and not reproduce, ending the cylce of that feral colony.

Feral cats usually live two or three years in outdoors, alone, exposed to whatever is out there: cars, poison, lack of food, sub zero temps – and die horrific deaths! When the cats came back after being “fixed” by the vet, Melissa hated the thought that they would be put out right away, so she made plans to keep them in her basement for a few days. That turned into a complete night-
mare. The cats (wild) were so freaked out they started jumping and breaking things. She said she could hear glass crashing down there! She and her husband went down to clean up the glass because they were afraid the cats would cut themselves and decided to let them run back outdoors through the bulk head door. They thought they had all run out until Melissa went downstairs a few days later and realized there was at least one or two cats still down there.

They let the bulk head open again, and finally the remaining cats made their way out. Melissa and husband Dan made a very lovely feral cat house for the cats – shelter, warmth – but the cats
have not used it yet, according to a neighbor who feeds them and allows they to hang out on their porch.

Hopefully, this colony of cats will figure it out and start to use it – especially now that the weather has turned bitter.

Melissa has already taken her two kittens to a wellness visit and has plans to have them spayed this month.

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Daisy and Delilah hit the jackpot when they were welcomed into Melissa and Dan’s home and life!

Sometimes it does take a village to make good things happen! This couple and their neighbors cared enough to have the stray/wild cats in their neighborhood fixed so they will stop breeding. They set up housing for them and are committed to keeping the cats fed and watered.

Thanks to the Worcester Animal Rescue League (WARL) – they first got the phone call about the cats and then handed the kitty project over to Spay Worcester. Spay Worcester then asked for a volunteer to spearhead the round up.

And so the story goes…

This holiday season, my love for animals shines bright!

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Go, wonderful Dorrie, go!!!

By Dorrie Maynard

People are always asking me how and
when it – my love for animals – began. I can’t remember a specific time or event that contributed to my passion, but I do know that it has awakened something inside of me.

If I see a dead animal in the street like a squirrel or raccoon, I alway say out loud: โ€œPoor baby, rest in peace.โ€ I feel like they should know that someone cares that they died.

I have been saving strays for a very long time. I think it started when I was little and would find cats that were sickly and abandoned. My dad hated cats and would always tell me that I couldn’t keep them. But he would take one look at them and say, Oh that thing will be dead in a day or two – you can keep it.

Low and behold, it didn’t die!

As an adult, my first dog came from the
Grafton Flea market. I called her Grafton. Unfortunately, when I got divorced from my husband he decided to keep her because I was moving into
an apartment that didn’t allow dogs. Eventually, my ex found her a good home with kids when he moved to Florida. I was heart broken that she wasn’t staying with him, but by that time I had moved to Maine and had to let her go.

I am still rescuing stray and feral cats! For one reason or another, they always manage to find their way to me! For instance, one morning I got up and there was a beautiful cat in a cat carrier left in my driveway. I think word got around that I was feeding strays and someone knew I would do the right thing by this cat. I would
have loved to keep the feline but I know my limits. I found the a great home through networking.

The Internet and Facebook have become a great resource for animal lovers and rescuers: there are many sites and groups that help you find homes for homeless animals. There are many, many people who are involved! I find it heartwarming that so many people care and go above and beyond to help animals and place them in forever homes!

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Penny at Dorrie and friends’ Spa Day for pups! She got a bath! photo by Dorrie Maynard

We have to be their voices and their earth angels, as it usually isn’t their fault that they are being re-homed. I live in a college neighborhood, and I believe students get cute little kittens and then when they start to grow or go into heat or their landlord finds out, they just let them go in the neighborhood to fend for themselves.

Last year I met one of my โ€œrescuesโ€ because his owners got a new kitten
and this cat, named Buddy, didn’t like the kitten. So he started spending more time outside and eventually warmed up to me. He was sleeping on my porch one
day when the owner walked by and rang the bell.

He said Buddy was his cat.

I said great, feel free to take him
home because it is going to start to get cold. Well, Buddy never went home and made his way into my house for the winter. He had his own suite – I would let him roam when I was home but he never warmed up to my cats. So I eventually put him in rescue. He has
found a perfect home of his own with no
other cats.

This year’s project is a beautiful black
cat with a white tuxedo and paws. He always ran away when I approached him, but I started feeding him canned food every time I saw him. Now I can pet him and he talks to me all the time! I thought he was feral, but now I believe he either belongs to someone who doesn’t feed him canned food, and he comes to see me daily for his โ€œmealโ€ – or he lives outside.

I worry about him come the freezing cold nights …

I will get Mr. Tuxedo fixed and vetted through Spay Worcester and put him into rescue. He deserves a home of his own as well. I have several insulated cat houses throughout the neighborhood but not sure he would use one.

My neighbor and I have a feeding station where there are two set ups of dry food and water for the neighborhood strays, as there are several that come to eat on a regular basis.

I volunteer with Spay Worcester, trapping and then having the feral cats spayed or neutered by a vet. I have met some wonderful people who have become interested in saving strays through this
great program. Recently, I met a woman and helped her trap two kittens that are now living in the lap of luxury in her home! She has become obsessed with kitties, and I consider her a member of
the crazy kit kat lady club! I guess we are all kindred souls when it comes to saving animals.

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Cece in her play-room! “Auntie Dorrie” gave Cece kitten food and three fun kitty toys! Another Auntie gave Cece a bed, a bunch of adorable kitten toys and cozy blankets! We are all in this – rescuing and caring for homeless animals – together! pic:R.T.

With the holidays upon us, please keep in mind that homeless animals are in need at local shelters and rescues. “Fostering” them is a way that you can keep an animal out of the shelter and provide a space for them in your loving home until they find their forever home. It is also a great way to decide if the baby could possibly be the pet for you and your family.

And please remember that shelters and rescues are always in need of pet food, litter, gently used towels and blankets in clean condition, or in kind donations.

Worcester Animal Rescue League

Central Mass Kibble Kitchen

Buddy Dog

Big Hair Rescue

New England All Breed, just to name a few!

I can be contacted at djmbytheelm@aol.com if anyone would like further information!

Happy Holidays to all and to all the fur babies out there!

Animal rights! – always in style!

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Rosalie’s mom loved cats! When she died Rose “inherited” April (pictured above), a homeless kitty Mrs. Tirella had made her precious own – for a decade+! pic:R.T.

A heartbreaking fate awaits homeless cats, as I learned firsthand

By Colleen O’Brien

I met Big Show nearly five years ago, when I moved into my new house. At the time, he was one of three feral cats who were fed and given outdoor shelter by a kind neighbor. He was a beautiful boy, with long, fluffy orange hair and big golden eyes.

One day, one of the cats, whose name I never knew, appeared injured, so I took her to the vet. She couldn’t walk and had a number of injuries to her hindquarters, and the vet recommended euthanasia to end her suffering. That left Big Show and Smokey, a black cat who was Big Show’s best friend.

Each summer, we’d see Big Show and Smokey looking for shade to keep cool. We put up a big umbrella on our porch for them to lie under. In the winter, I put straw in the houses and shelters that my neighbor had set up for them so they had something to burrow down into to fend off the cold. Still, these shelters couldn’t keep them as warm as a home would have. Every time a winter storm came through, I worried that they would freeze to death. During sweltering summers and bitterly cold winters, life must have been miserable for them.

My family and I started feeding them regularly, putting out food when we got home from work. Initially, they took only food that was placed at the end of our yard. But after more than four years of this routine, Big Show became a bit more comfortable around us and began timidly making his way onto our back porch for food. Once Smokey saw that his friend was safe, he joined him.

Eventually, Big Show began watching for the kitchen light to come on, signaling that I was home. Then he’d venture onto our back porch and call out until I fed him. As always, Smokey would join him once he was sure there was no danger.

One night, during one of our feedings, Big Show finally let me pet him. From neck to tail, there was not a spot on this poor cat that wasn’t covered with matted knots. They were so tight against his skin that I knew it must be uncomfortable, even painful, for him to move. I tried to pet mostly his face and head and to avoid touching the knots and hurting him. He loved it. I think this was the first time in his life that he’d been touched. After that night, he began visiting not only for food but also for affection. I decided to give him just a couple more days to learn to trust me, then I would take him to the vet and have the knots removed.

But I never got the chance.

Not long after that, Big Show was lying on our porch late one night. He didn’t get up to greet me, which I thought was odd, but I ignored the voice in my head telling me that something was wrong. Smokey, as always, was nearby, watching. I petted Big Show for a while and then went inside. That was the last time I saw him.

The next day, I thought about his behavior the night before, and I just knew something was wrong. I called my neighbors, but no one had seen him. My fiancรฉ and I went out looking for him but to no avail. When we saw Smokey lying all alone in a neighbor’s yard, my heart sank.

I believe Big Show came to my house the night that he was dying. Then he went somewhere and died alone.

I can’t forgive myself for not taking him to the vet that night. I failed him. And whoever dumped him on the street and left him to fend for himselfโ€”they failed him, too. I hope I made his life a little better while I knew him. And I’ll try to do the same for Smokey, who is alone now, and for any other cats who show up homeless in my neighborhood because their “owners” refuse to spay or neuter their animals or don’t recognize or care how dangerous and miserable it is for cats who are forced to live outdoors.