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Unemployed workers share Scott Brown’s anti-jobs record

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Worcester – Unemployed constituents from the Worcester area sent a loud-and-clear message to US Senator Scott Brown yesterday at Worcester State University: “We won’t be fooled.”

 Dozens of out-of-work residents gathered at the Bay State Jobs Fair to share the junior senator’s multitude of votes against jobs with event attendees. The cast of concerned job-seekers fanned out across the campus, ensuring that area residents knew the truth about Brown’s eight votes to end employment benefits.

They spread the word about Brown’s vote to gut 400,000 jobs for teachers, fire fighters and police officers across the country, as well as his vote to keep 11,000 construction workers in the unemployment line.

And they were sure to point out that Scott Brown did all that while protecting tax breaks for corporations that ship our jobs overseas.

 View photos from the Worcester State University action here  

With Scott Brown already stamping out more than two million jobs in less than two years, unemployed constituents promised to carry their public education effort to future job-related events hosted by the senator or his staff.

Neighborhood meeting tonight, re: the PIP! Please attend! Speak out!

Monday, December 5th, 2011

By Rosalie Tirella

Hoping there are a ton of Main South and D-4 residents tonight, 6:30 p.m., at the Worcester Housing Authority building at 50 Murray Ave. for the neighborhood meeting, re: The PIP reopening.

The reincarnation of the PIP, unfortunately, is a done deal. Here’s hoping the meeting, called by D-4 Barbara Haller, draws lots of folks to voice their concerns. Maybe they can actually get City Hall and the WPD to show them some respect.

People, agitate for:

A police substation at the PIP would do a lot to disperse the nefarious types who prey on PIP clients. Also, please demand the planting of trees, sidewalk repair, etc.

If you don’t SPEAK OUT, no one will hear you!

Where Does Occupy Wall Street Go From Here? A proposal from Michael Moore

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Friends,

This past weekend I participated in a four-hour meeting of Occupy Wall Street activists whose job it is to come up with the vision and goals of the movement. It was attended by 40+ people and the discussion was both inspiring and invigorating. Here is what we ended up proposing as the movement’s “vision statement” to the General Assembly of Occupy Wall Street:

We Envision: [1] a truly free, democratic, and just society; [2] where we, the people, come together and solve our problems by consensus; [3] where people are encouraged to take personal and collective responsibility and participate in decision making; [4] where we learn to live in harmony and embrace principles of toleration and respect for diversity and the differing views of others; [5] where we secure the civil and human rights of all from violation by tyrannical forces and unjust governments; [6] where political and economic institutions work to benefit all, not just the privileged few; [7] where we provide full and free education to everyone, not merely to get jobs but to grow and flourish as human beings; [8] where we value human needs over monetary gain, to ensure decent standards of living without which effective democracy is impossible; [9] where we work together to protect the global environment to ensure that future generations will have safe and clean air, water and food supplies, and will be able to enjoy the beauty and bounty of nature that past generations have enjoyed.

The next step will be to develop a specific list of goals and demands. As one of the millions of people who are participating in the Occupy Wall Street movement, I would like to respectfully offer my suggestions of what we can all get behind now to wrestle the control of our country out of the hands of the 1% and place it squarely with the 99% majority.

Here is what I will propose to the General Assembly of Occupy Wall Street:

10 Things We Want
A Proposal for Occupy Wall Street
Submitted by Michael Moore 

1. Eradicate the Bush tax cuts for the rich and institute new taxes on the wealthiest Americans and on corporations, including a tax on all trading on Wall Street (where they currently pay 0%).

2. Assess a penalty tax on any corporation that moves American jobs to other countries when that company is already making profits in America. Our jobs are the most important national treasure and they cannot be removed from the country simply because someone wants to make more money.

3. Require that all Americans pay the same Social Security tax on all of their earnings (normally, the middle class pays about 6% of their income to Social Security; someone making $1 million a year pays about 0.6% (or 90% less than the average person). This law would simply make the rich pay what everyone else pays.

4. Reinstate the Glass-Steagall Act, placing serious regulations on how business is conducted by Wall Street and the banks.

5. Investigate the Crash of 2008, and bring to justice those who committed any crimes.

6. Reorder our nation’s spending priorities (including the ending of all foreign wars and their cost of over $2 billion a week). This will re-open libraries, reinstate band and art and civics classes in our schools, fix our roads and bridges and infrastructure, wire the entire country for 21st century internet, and support scientific research that improves our lives.

7. Join the rest of the free world and create a single-payer, free and universal health care system that covers all Americans all of the time.

8. Immediately reduce carbon emissions that are destroying the planet and discover ways to live without the oil that will be depleted and gone by the end of this century.

9. Require corporations with more than 10,000 employees to restructure their board of directors so that 50% of its members are elected by the company’s workers. We can never have a real democracy as long as most people have no say in what happens at the place they spend most of their time: their job. (For any U.S. businesspeople freaking out at this idea because you think workers can’t run a successful company: Germany has a law like this and it has helped to make Germany the world’s leading manufacturing exporter.)

10. We, the people, must pass three constitutional amendments that will go a long way toward fixing the core problems we now have. These include:

a) A constitutional amendment that fixes our broken electoral system by 1) completely removing campaign contributions from the political process; 2) requiring all elections to be publicly financed; 3) moving election day to the weekend to increase voter turnout; 4) making all Americans registered voters at the moment of their birth; 5) banning computerized voting and requiring that all elections take place on paper ballots.

b) A constitutional amendment declaring that corporations are not people and do not have the constitutional rights of citizens. This amendment should also state that the interests of the general public and society must always come before the interests of corporations.

c) A constitutional amendment that will act as a “second bill of rights” as proposed by President Frankin D. Roosevelt: that every American has a human right to employment, to health care, to a free and full education, to breathe clean air, drink clean water and eat safe food, and to be cared for with dignity and respect in their old age.

Let me know what you think. Occupy Wall Street enjoys the support of millions. It is a movement that cannot be stopped. Become part of it by sharing your thoughts with me or online (at OccupyWallSt.org). Get involved in (or start!) your own local Occupy movement. Make some noise. You don’t have to pitch a tent in lower Manhattan to be an Occupier. You are one just by saying you are. This movement has no singular leader or spokesperson; every participant is a leader in their neighborhood, their school, their place of work. Each of you is a spokesperson to those whom you encounter. There are no dues to pay, no permission to seek in order to create an action.

We are but ten weeks old, yet we have already changed the national conversation. This is our moment, the one we’ve been hoping for, waiting for. If it’s going to happen it has to happen now. Don’t sit this one out. This is the real deal. This is it.

Have a happy Thanksgiving!

Yours,
Michael Moore

Suffolk University to host free career seminar for veterans

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

EOLWD, DVS and Suffolk University to Host Free Career Seminar for Veterans: “Marketing Your Military Service”

Boston – On Wednesday, November 2, the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development (EOLWD) and the Department of Veterans’ Services (DVS) will partner with Suffolk University to host a free Career Seminar for job-seeking veterans.

The full-day seminar, “Marketing Your Military Service,” will provide the advice, resources and tools necessary for job-seeking veterans to properly maximize Massachusetts’ resources available for veterans entering or returning to the workforce.

Secretary of Veterans’ Services Coleman Nee as well as Suffolk University’s Acting President and Provost Barry Brown will be on hand for opening remarks. Secretary Nee will then lead the first panel of the day.

A Resource Expo will take place in the afternoon. Highlights include: Asian American Civic Association, Helmets to Hardhats, Home Base Program, Suffolk University Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Suffolk University Office of Graduate Admissions, Suffolk University Law School Office of Admissions, There & Back Again, Veterans Upward Bound, Vet Center, Veterans Training School: New England Center for Homeless Veterans, and Vocational Rehabilitation Program: VetSuccess.

The day will conclude with individual resume reviews facilitated by representatives from EOLWD, the state’s One Stop Career Centers and Suffolk University human resources professionals. Participants are encouraged to bring resumes and cover letters for review.

Refreshments and a complimentary lunch will be provided.

For more information, please visit: http://www.mass.gov/eolwd/vetseminar

Maximum weekly benefit rate for new unemployment claims to increase

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

 Boston - The Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development (EOLWD) today announced that the maximum weekly benefit rate for new unemployment claims filed on or after October 2, 2011 will increase from the current rate of $625 to $653.

Massachusetts law requires the maximum weekly benefit amount for unemployment insurance claimants to be revised annually based on the average weekly wage for the twelve months ending March 2011.  The average weekly wage in Massachusetts increased from $1,088.06 to $1,135.82.  By law, the maximum benefit rate equals 57.5 percent of the state’s annual average weekly wage, rounded to the next lowest dollar amount.

This new benefit rate will not affect the weekly benefit amount of individuals who have established new claims prior to October 2, 2011, but have not yet received benefits checks.

 
Unemployment insurance claimants in Massachusetts receive a weekly benefit amount of 50 percent of his or her average weekly wage up to the maximum weekly amount. 
 
For information on the Massachusetts Department of Unemployment Assistance, please visit www.mass.gov/dua.

The New America

Saturday, October 1st, 2011

By Jack Hoffman

As unemployment grows, the poverty statistics grow with it. And the anger becomes greater. One wonders: When will the people take to the streets again?

Recently, on his radio talk show, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned “that if the national jobs crisis doesn’t end soon, the United States will soon see riots in the streets.”

Call it what you want, but the warnings of riots and revolution have been echoed all over the country in magazines, newspapers and talk on the radio and TV shows. Professor Thomas Kochan at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, certainly no bastion of liberalism, not only agrees with Mayor Bloomberg, but also was surprised there aren’t more visible signs of public anger/protests.

The real unemployment figure for the US has now reached a staggering 20%. And just how much is the real under-employment, meaning the figures on those who are now working a bare minimum of what they used to work and earn not so long ago. The figures I have used – and will use – are based on the US Dept. of Labor statistics. Recently, the job crisis has been inflamed with the new reports of poverty in America. That last statement is an obvious fact. If people are out of a job and working at a bare minimal wage Click to continue »

Mass. job stats

Friday, August 19th, 2011

Boston – The Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development reported this week that the preliminary July job estimates show an increase of 12,700 jobs, for a total of 3,246,800 jobs in Massachusetts. The private sector gained 11,600 jobs. The July total unemployment rate remained at 7.6 percent, well below the national rate of 9.1 percent.

Six of the ten private sectors added jobs in July with the largest over the month gains in Education and Health Services; Other Services; Trade, Transportation and Utilities; Manufacturing; Professional and Business Services; and Financial Activities. The July job gain follows a revised 9,400 job gain in June, previously reported as a 10,400 job gain.

Over-the-year (July 2010 to July 2011), jobs are up 56,800, for a growth rate of 1.8 percent. Private sector jobs are up 61,900, a growth rate of 2.2 percent, with gains in nine of the ten sectors. Year-to-date, (December 2010 to July 2011), 53,000 jobs have been added in the Bay State with 58,200 jobs in the private sector.

Employment Overview

Education and Health Services gained 3,000 jobs (+0.4%) as Health Care and Social Assistance added 2,600 jobs (+0.5%) and Educational Services gained 400 (+0.2%) jobs. Over-the-year, this sector has added 17,300 (+2.6%) jobs with Health Care and Social Assistance gaining 15,000 (+3.0%) jobs and Educational Services 2,300 (+1.4%) jobs.

Other Services added 3,800 (+3.2%) jobs over-the-month. The increases in the sector are the result of seasonal hiring, some of which occurred later than in prior years and at higher levels than the last few years. Since July 2010, jobs in this sector are up 3,100 (+2.6%).

Trade, Transportation, and Utilities gained 2,900 jobs (+0.5%). Of the component industries, Wholesale Trade gained the greatest number of jobs, 1,400 (+1.1%); Transportation and Warehousing gained 1,100 jobs (+1.3%) and Retail Trade gained 400 jobs (+0.1%). Over-the-year, jobs are up 5,300 (+1.0%) with Wholesale Trade gaining back 2,000 (+1.6%) jobs and Retail Trade adding 3,300 (+1.0%) jobs. Click to continue »

Local activists celebrate unemployment extensions – decry huge expenditures that will hurt economy

Thursday, December 23rd, 2010

US Senators give themselves and other very wealthy a double tax break!

“I am personally relieved the unemployment extensions passed but I am disgusted by the Republican driven give-away of the farm! How do we re-build jobs when all our government money is being spent in ways that CBO and recent history has shown destroy our economy?” said Sharron Tetrault whose own unemployment extension and job future rests in the balance. Ms. Tetrault, an unemployed human services worker, led local efforts to reach Congressman Frank.

Local members of the Grace Team, many of them unemployed themselves, spearheaded efforts in Massachusetts over the last few weeks to ensure unemployment extensions while fighting for long-term job and economic growth. That growth will be stunted by tax break for the very wealthy Click to continue »