‘Home Grown: Cultivating the next generation of urban farmers’

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pics:Rose Tirella

Clark U, 950 Main St.

7 p.m.

Nov. 9

FREE TO ALL!

Clark University to host agricultural expert for ‘Home Grown: Cultivating the next generation of urban farmers,’ Nov. 9

Clark University will host “Home Grown: Cultivating the Next Generation of Urban Farmers,” a lecture by agricultural expert Jennifer Hashley, at 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 9, in the Higgins Lounge in Dana Commons.

Demand for fresh, locally-grown food close to urban centers is increasing. In this lecture, Hashley will present her strategies for raising the next generation of environmentally responsible farmers.

Hashley has spent more than 15 years in the field of sustainable agriculture. She is the director of the New Entry Sustainable Farming Project at Tufts University’s Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, and has helped transform New Entry into a nationally recognized farmer training program. She is responsible for the overall strategic direction and management of the organization that includes three incubator training farms, horticultural, livestock, and farm business training courses, a food hub (World PEAS), and several national -scale, capacity-building programs for beginning farmers and food security efforts.

Hashley is also an agricultural business instructor for the Mass. Department of Agricultural Resources and serves on the boards and steering committees of multiple agricultural organizations. She has earned numerous leadership awards for her food systems work, and has been selected as an Environmental Leadership Fellow and an Eisenhower Agriculture Fellow. In 2003, she and her husband, a full-time vegetable farmer, started Pete and Jen’s Backyard Birds, a diversified pasture-based livestock operation. This year, they relocated their farm to Lincoln, Mass., where they manage Codman Community Farms.

This free, public event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Department of Economics and the George Perkins Marsh Institute.

It is part of the Higgins School’s Fall 2016 series “Home (De)Constructed,” which explores what “home” truly means.