Tag Archives: bears

Helping abused animals – always in style!

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In the arena basement, to be chained up – again.

Ringling’s demise closes a chapter in the campaign to help animals

By CircusesHurtAnimals.com (formerly Daniel Carron)

After a grueling trip in cramped, fetid boxcars, the elephants had been unchained and unloaded near a noisy coal pier and were being marched almost 5 miles through the city to the arena in which Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus would be performing.

Asha kept falling behind, but the trainer didn’t care. Throughout the entire march, he yanked on her ear with a bullhook — a heavy, steel-tipped weapon that circus trainers use to “break” elephants’ spirits — and kept saying, “Asha, keep up! Asha, keep up!” All I wanted to do was tell her that she could stop, that she didn’t have to suffer like that.

When I got home, I couldn’t stop thinking about Asha being led into the arena basement to be chained up again. That was her life: the train and the basement. I had to do something else besides protesting.

So I changed my name.

“CircusesHurtAnimals.com” is what tellers see on my checks and cashiers see on my credit card. It’s the name on my driver’s license, and besides spelling out my contempt for circuses that exploit animals, it almost always opens the door to conversations about the beatings and whippings that they inflict on animals to coerce them into performing.

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All of us at PETA will continue to speak out against Ringling until May 21, when it finally shuts down following its shows in Uniondale, New York. After that, we’ll keep pressing the case that circuses hurt animals.

Why? Because when Ringling took elephants off the road last year, it found another way to exploit them.

Instead of being transferred to reputable sanctuaries where they could roam and socialize, the elephants were hauled to Ringling’s Florida breeding and training compound, where they spend as long as 23 painful hours a day chained to concrete floors, are threatened with bullhooks, and continue to be used — only now it’s for medical tests.

We’ll keep speaking up, because Asha was sent to a zoo in Oklahoma and because Ringling is still abusing other animals.

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When tigers aren’t being paraded around a ring under threat of a whip, they’re kept in cages so small that they can barely take a single step in any direction, so they do everything — eat, drink, sleep, defecate — all in one place.

Inactivity is wrecking their health: Most are overweight and some are obese, which puts them at risk of arthritis, liver and kidney failure, and heart disease.

I’ll never forget the moment when I found out that Ringling was closing. I was cashing out and talking with a bartender about my name when I got a text from a friend that said, “You can change your name back now.” I literally shouted, “Ringling is closing!” It was all I could say. We went to another bar and celebrated with shots.

We’ll probably take champagne to Uniondale, and while I’m excited about it, I don’t have that “Our work here is done” feeling. Ringling has a history of exploiting animals, and there’s no reason to think that it will suddenly stop. We have to get the elephants and tigers and all the other animals into reputable sanctuaries.

But there’s little doubt that other animal-exploiting circuses will fall, because the biggest domino has come down— in fact, UniverSoul and Garden Bros. are already feeling the pressure.

PETA isn’t against all circuses — just the ones that use animals.

Last year, when we were protesting Ringling in Norfolk, Virginia, a family came up and looked at our posters, and the little daughter started crying. Someone gave her a stuffed elephant that we’d brought along, and that made her happy. Kids instinctively love animals, and when she found out what was happening to the animals and told her family that she didn’t want to go to the circus after all, it reminded us that people really are listening.

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The bears need our help, too!!😢😢😢😢

Some pics from our FB circus page gal, Deb Young …

Deb has been posting such important information on wild animals in circuses and animals in general on our FB circus page, on this website. … More and more people are “liking” the page (click on text by baby elephant being “trained” to get to it). Hopefully, we’re all learning and changing the way we engage with our planet’s beautiful and always mysterious fauna.

Here’s Deb and her adorable chihuahua, Juno! I really like the second photo: You can see the love Juno has for Deb … her eyes are closed in contentment … it looks as if she’s smiling!    – R.T.

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5 Circuses that need to follow Ringling and get rid of elephant acts

From PETA.ORG . PLEASE BOYCOTT THESE CIRCUSES UNTIL THEY STOP USING WILD ANIMALS!

A few of them come to Worcester! OUR CITY MUST SHOUT: STOP THE CRUELTY TO ELEPHANTS!!!

And … a reminder!

Local gal Deb Young has created an informative and lively FB page on the wild animals forced to perform in traveling shows. Want to learn ALL ABOUT elephants, tigers, lions, bears, monkeys and the work being done in Massachusetts AND AROUND THE WORLD to put an end to their suffering in circuses, roadside zoos, traveling shows?  Then CLICK ON CIRCUS FB PAGE on THIS WEBSITE! (near the photo of the poor baby elephant!)

We’ve gained momentum with Ringling’s decision!!! Let’s PUSH ON!!!!!             – R. Tirella

 

5 Circuses That Need to Follow Ringling and Get Rid of Elephant Acts Now

Written by PETA March 13, 2015

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus has conceded: The public no longer supports dragging elephants around the country and forcing them to perform tricks under the constant threat of being hit with a bullhook, so it’s phasing out its elephant acts. These other circuses should accept that the days of elephant exploitation are long over and allow the elephants used in their shows to be retired and relocated to sanctuaries:

1.) UniverSoul Circus

Atlanta law-enforcement officials recently charged both a UniverSoul Circus representative and Larry Carden, the elephant exhibitor performing with the circus, with cruelty to animals after a whistleblower reported to PETA that a handler with the circus forced an apparently fearful elephant to leave the stage by inserting a bullhook—a sharp metal weapon that resembles a fireplace poker—into the animal’s sensitive mouth.

A UniverSoul Circus trainer brandishes a bullhook.

2.) Carson & Barnes

The notorious Carson & Barnes Circus has a long history of abusing elephants. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently cited the circus for failing to provide an elephant named Nina with adequate veterinary care. Nina—whom a Carson & Barnes worker was caught beating on video while touring with another circus in 2011—has lost 500 pounds in the last several months alone.

Nina, an Elephant with the Carson and Barnes Circus.

Nina, an Elephant with the Carson and Barnes Circus.

3.) Kelly Miller Circus

Kelly Miller Circus is using a lonely, sad elephant named Anna Louise. Elephants are highly social animals who suffer when denied the company of other elephants.

Elephants with the Kelly Miller circus and a trainer with a bullhook.

4.) Shrine Circuses

Shrine Circuses rent their elephant acts from a variety of exhibitors— all of which have deplorable records of animal care.

Shrine Circus elephant rides.

5.) Cole Brothers Circus

The Cole Bros. Circus paid a civil penalty of $15,000 to settle more than ten Animal Welfare Act violations. In 2011, Cole Bros. and its president pleaded guilty to violating the Endangered Species Act by illegally selling two Asian elephants. The circus was ordered to pay more than $150,000 in fines.

Tina and Jewel Cole Brothers Circus

What You Can Do

Urge Circus World, which has historically hired the notorious exhibitor Carson & Barnes Circus, to end cruel elephant exhibits. Also, only buy tickets to cruelty-free circuses that don’t force animals to perform silly tricks.

The circus is coming to Worcester! Be prepared!!! 12 Things Ringling Doesn’t Want You to Know

PLEASE! Let Worcester’s city manager and city councilors know that you are AGAINST Ringling coming to Worcester! That wild animals do not belong on train box cars, are not supposed to be wearing head-dresses or saddles, should not – it’s morally reprehensible! – be forced to be anything but themselves. Wild animals!

Wild (exotic) animals, such as chimps, can NEVER be domesticated. Cute little chimps mature into adult chimpanzees  that can (and have) done real damage to the addle-brained humans who, stupidly, think they are our “pals.”  Wild animals are not domesticated dogs or cats or goats or cows or chickens! THEY have not been domesticated – genetically speaking! You can not BEAT, TRAIN a wild animal’s genetic NATURE out of it! Humans never have! We never will! For ex: Cute, captive polar bear cubs will attack and do serious damage to the very same people who have bottle nursed them and snuggled them and smooched them up when they are just a few months older! Why can’t we “get” this? Cuz the animals are so GORGEOUS and AWE-INSPIRING and we are so selfish.

PLEASE click on the CLICK HERE at bottom of this list to LEARN MUCH MORE!  OR visit the InCity Times cirucs Facebook page on this website (just click b y the elephant photo to the right on this screen)                      – Rosalie  Tirella

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12 Things Ringling Doesn’t Want You to Know

If there’s one thing Ringling Bros. circus has proved over the years, it’s that it’s the cruelest show on Earth. Here are 12 things that Ringling Bros. doesn’t want you to know:

1. The circus tears babies away from their mothers.

At around 21 months old, baby elephants are dragged away from their mothers, who have to be restrained. In the wild, males stay with their mothers until they’re teenagers and female elephants stay with their mothers their entire lives.

2. “Breaking” elephants really means “breaking their spirits.”

Baby elephants are forced to stand on a concrete floor for about 23 hours a day for up to six months, unable to lie down or even turn around.

3. Trainers use bullhooks, ropes, and electric prods.

Baby elephants learn to fear bullhooks from a very young age.

4. Training goes unmonitored by any agency of any kind.

The elephants cry out, but there is no one there to help them.

5. Elephants spend most of their lives in chains.

When they aren’t performing, elephants are confined.

6. Elephants travel in boxcars like these for up to 100 hours straight.

The doors are barely bigger than they are.

7. Elephants are beaten for the slightest disobedience.

8. The wounds on this elephant are plainly visible.

Trainers usually cover them up with “Wonder Dust” so that inspectors can’t see them.

9. Ringling paid a $270,000 fine for violations of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA).

10. Ringling’s abuse lasts a lifetime.

11. Protests are organized almost everywhere that Ringling goes.

12. Even kids know about Ringling’s abuse.

The sheen around “the cruelest show on Earth” is nearly gone, as more and more people speak out against Ringling’s barbaric practices every day!

Read more – click here!

Exotic pets: a deadly business

By Jennifer O’Connor

Authorities at Bangkok’s international airport recently arrested a passenger whose suitcases were reportedly jam-packed with leopard and panther cubs, a bear and monkeys. The dazed animals had been drugged and were headed for Dubai, apparently part of an international trafficking network.

While this seizure made headlines, smuggling of exotic and endangered animals takes place every day, and those animals who somehow survive often end up in pet stores, classified ads and flea markets right here at home.

Animals who were flying through rainforest canopies or roaming vast savannahs find themselves stuffed into pillowcases, duffle bags and spare tires. Since concealment is paramount, they are denied food, water and any semblance of comfort during transport. Many, like the 18 dead and dying monkeys found jammed into a man’s girdle last year, suffocate or succumb to starvation and dehydration. Others suffer injuries from rough handling or from fights with other crazed victims.

From kinkajous to tigers, sugar gliders to pythons, as long as a dealer can make a buck, any animal imaginable is available for the “right price.” Continue reading Exotic pets: a deadly business