Tag Archives: calves

Early voters! All voters! – Please VOTE YES on QUESTION 3

20160728_152801-1-1
Rosalie asks you to Vote YES on Q 3 – for the animals!

Question 3 – Humane Conditions for Farm Animals

Question 3 “would prohibit any confinement of pigs, calves, and hens that prevents them from lying down, standing up, fully extending their limbs, or turning around freely.”

PLEASE VOTE YES ON QUESTION 3!

By Rosalie Tirella

Don’t believe the fear-mongers!!! A YES vote on Question 3 helps the Mass. economy! Especially our local Worcester County farmers, all of whom farm with wisdom and compassion! A YES vote means an economic boost for our local farmer guys and gals! A YES vote means you are supporting our LOCAL biz folks – mostly small biz folks. Many of whom are third/fourth generation farmers…

Egg, pork and veal suppliers from other states who “factory farm” – an innocuos-sounding phrase that only hints at the cruelty/neglect that is never-ending when raising farm animals in gargantuan, miles-long warehouses, “animal-factories” where pigs, chickens and calves are treated like widgets/assembly line parts and not like animals – will have to make improvements. Animals that need sunlight; space in which to turn around, walk around, stand up, fully extend their limbs; caregivers who don’t kick, stomp, punch or fling them will at least be given “the right” to turn around in their crates and cages, lie down, turn their heads, stand up. So basic!!! This is all Q 3 asks for!

Factory farms that truck their “product” “produced” by animals living in factory farm animal-hells will be prohibited from selling their “product” in Massachusetts. Their pork, eggs, veal will not be accepted here until their farm animals are housed more humanely. Just like the way McDonald’s and Wal-Mart treat their egg suppliers: If you house your chickens in animal hell, these multi-billion dollar global corporations tell the factory farms, then we don’t buy your eggs – do business with you!

OUTSTANDING! VISIONARY!

The ABUSE of farm animals in America on factory farms MUST STOP! LIKE ALL AMAZING animal/human (the two are intertwined!) RIGHTS crusades, A NEW AND BETTER WORLD FOR FARM ANIMALS needs to start somewhere. Why not in beautiful Massachusetts, once home to the abolitionists and suffragettes and now home to climate-change visionaries and women’s rights crusaders? Suppliers will get the message and, for love of the holy BUCK$$$, they WILL MAKE the necessary improvements. They will make THEIR HUGE FACILITIES MORE HUMANE so they can once again sell their “product” in Massachusetts. Like Woody sang: It’s all about the do(ugh) re me!

If all 50 of our great states had a Question 3 on their ballots election day what a wonderful America it would be! And if it was voted in, millions of farm animals would be able to literally breathe more freely, cry out in pain and fear a little less often, physically ache not as intensely … stand, turn around, move their heads in their cages/crates, fully extend their limbs! This is all we ask! To alleviate some of their suffering! 

Slavery in the U.S. was once called “good business” by millions of “good” people in this country!

Child labor was once labelled “good business,” too!

Circuses with performing elephants were “business” as usual all over the world.

But times change. People evolve – our hearts grow bigger. We see the light.

SEE THE LIGHT this election season! EARLY VOTERS and NOV. 8 VOTERS – please Vote YES  on Question 3!

Thank you!

*********

The yes on Question 3, Citizens for Farm Animal Protection (www.citizensforfarmanimals.com) state on the Secretary of State’s ballot information mailer:

• “A YES vote prevents cruel treatment of animals in Massachusetts by ending the practice of cramming farm animals into cages so small they can’t turn around or stretch their limbs, and will remove inhumane and unsafe products from the Massachusetts marketplace.”

• “Endorsed by the MSPCA, Animal Rescue League of Boston, The Humane Society of the United States, and 400 Massachusetts veterinarians because no animal should be immobilized in a cramped cage.”

“Endorsed by the Center for Food Safety and Consumer Federation of America because cage confinement increases food safety risks, and a YES vote protects Massachusetts consumers.”

“Endorsed by Massachusetts family farmers and the United Farm Workers because proper treatment of animals is better for farmers. From McDonald’s to Walmart, retailers are switching to
cage-free eggs—the right thing to do at the right cost.”

VOTE YES ON 3!!!!

********

From PETA.ORG:

Factory Farming: Misery for Animals

On today’s factory farms, animals are crammed by the thousands into filthy, windowless sheds and stuffed into wire cages, metal crates, and other torturous devices. These animals will never raise their families, root around in the soil, build nests, or do anything that is natural and important to them. Most won’t even feel the warmth of the sun on their backs or breathe fresh air until the day they’re loaded onto trucks headed for slaughterhouses.

The factory farming industry strives to maximize output while minimizing costs—always at the animals’ expense. The giant corporations that run most factory farms have found that they can make more money by squeezing as many animals as possible into tiny spaces, even though many of the animals die from disease or infection.

Animals on factory farms endure constant fear and torment:

They’re often given so little space that they can’t even turn around or lie down comfortably. Egg-laying hens are kept in small cages, chickens and pigs are kept in jam-packed sheds, and cows are kept on crowded, filthy feedlots.

Antibiotics are used to make animals grow faster and to keep them alive in the unsanitary conditions. Research shows that factory farms’ widespread use of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria that threaten human health.

Most factory-farmed animals have been genetically manipulated to grow larger or to produce more milk or eggs than they naturally would. Some chickens grow so unnaturally large that their legs cannot support their outsized bodies, and they suffer from starvation or dehydration when they can’t walk to reach food and water.

When they’ve grown large enough to slaughter or their bodies have been worn out from producing milk or eggs, animals raised for food are crowded onto trucks and transported for miles through all weather extremes, typically without food or water. At the slaughterhouse, those who survived the transport will have their throats slit, often while they’re still conscious. Many remain conscious when they’re plunged into the scalding-hot water of the defeathering or hair-removal tanks or while their bodies are being skinned or hacked apart.

********

VOTE YES ON QUESTION 3!

Why this feminist would ‘rather go naked’

IENallthesameVERT2016TEXT
Ingrid

By Ingrid Newkirk
 
Is it odd that a feminist like me, from back in the bra-burning ’60s, champions racy protests featuring women wearing little more than body-paint markings that mimic a butcher’s diagram? Some might raise an eyebrow, but this March, National Women’s History Month, let me explain why I believe that supporting women’s rights and stripping for a cause go together like Gloria Steinem and miniskirts.
 
With feminism, as with all social movements, each generation has its own battles to fight, and while respect is certainly owed those who helped society evolve to this point, today is a new day with new issues to grapple with. I relate best now to the third-wave feminists who are sick of second-wave feminists—ever so ironically taking the place of repressive fathers and husbands—demanding that women cover ourselves up and “behave.” How dare we expose our bodies to prying eyes! But dare we do, with more feminists daring to do something more important: to challenge the idea that breasts are to be kept covered like a dirty magazine.
 
At PETA, which is awash with “uppity women” like me, we’d rather go naked than wear not only fur but leather or wool—any skin. We see animal liberation as a logical part of a philosophy that rejects violence to, and the exploitation of, those who are not exactly like oneself in some way or another. We reject prejudice on the basis of any arbitrary factor such as skin color, gender, sexual orientation, religion or species. For surely there is something fundamentally wrong with moaning about freedom for yourself while denying it to others.
 
We are all of us composed of flesh and blood. We have faces and feelings and a beating heart, as did the pigs and chickens and other animals who were killed and decapitated for nothing more than a fleeting taste. What is done to them would be the same if it were done to us. And that’s the point of provocative PETA campaigns such as our “All Animals Have the Same Parts” protests featuring those aforementioned butcher’s diagrams. The scantily clad women who stand out in the cold know that people will stop and stare and that many of them will have never thought about animal rights before. That’s the power of their protest.  
 
Instead of attacking the (naked) messenger, who doesn’t need anyone’s permission to strip, I ask people to  put that energy and outrage where it belongs—into taking action against those who would abuse and exploit the most vulnerable among us. Women’s rights and animal rights go hand in hand. If you reject violence against women, you can’t in good conscience eat bacon and drink milk. Why? Because mother pigs—sows, who are smart as the dickens and who love their precious babies as dearly as any human mother loves hers—are confined to metal crates so small that they can’t even turn around and they develop painful ulcers from the constant pressure of lying, nearly immobile, on the unyielding cement floor. Because terrified, crying calves are torn away from their devoted mothers right after birth so that humans can steal the milk that was meant for them. Because factory farm and slaughterhouse workers, who have grueling, dangerous, soul-crushing jobs, often take their frustrations out on female animals by sexually assaulting them—sometimes in their terrifying last moments. The video is on our website and is hard to watch.
 
I have seen slaughter, have seen pigs beaten and loaded into the trucks on their way to it, and have been disturbed by the unmistakable sorrow and fear on their faces as they rattled down a highway for the first and last time ever. It’s the same look that you or I would have. We all feel pain and fear and long for the freedom to live our lives. We’re all the same.
 
With one significant difference.
 
Unlike the pigs and turkeys and fish and cows, I have choices. I can choose to walk away from meat and eggs and dairy products and continue enjoying my life, opting instead for healthy, humane vegan foods. If you haven’t done that yet, please, come join me. Women unite for animal rights!

VOTE YES FOR THE CHICKENS! … HUMANE CONDITIONS FOR MASS CHICKENS NOW!

CAM00096
Trader Joe’s grocery store in Shrewsbury has got plenty of vegan options! Earth Balance spread! Soy milk and yummy almond milk, too!    pic: R.T.

By Rosalie Tirella

ICT editor Rosalie does lots of her grocery shopping at Trader Joe’s in Shrewsbury because they have a nice selection of vegan foods: food not derived from American farm animals. The animals on American farms do not lead bucolic lives! They lead horrific lives!

Chickens are crammed into cages, pumped with hormones to make their breasts huge, leaving them unable to stand on little legs. Filthy living conditions call for plenty of antibiotics! And to keep the stressed out, crazed birds from pecking at themselves and each other, “farmers” rip their beaks off – without anesthesia.

Pigs and veal calves are kept in pens where they can’t even stretch out or turn around!

The cruelty most STOP! Consumers do NOT want to support a food-production system that many compare to an animal concentration camp!

Here is some great news:

kreiter_humanesociety3_met.r

For the Mass folks who want to eat eggs with a lighter conscience, for the folks who are vegan and have been praying for this day – THE CAGE-FREE CHICKEN REFERENDUM and more! comes to Massachusetts! On the Mass ballot this November!

PLEASE VOTE YES!!!!!!!!!

If passed, the proposed laws would prohibit raising Massachusetts farm animals in small pens where they cannot:

fully extend their limbs

turn around

We’ve been writing about these INHUMANE “farming” practices for years!

Finally, as with the circus issue, we are moving FORWARD!!!

I am so proud to have pushed these issues in InCity Times for almost 15 YEARS and on this website since its inception.

The law would also prohibit the sale of pork, veal or eggs in Massachusetts if the animals producing the food are raised by these methods on farms outside Massachusetts.

YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Go, Massachusetts, go!

CLICK HERE to read the Boston Globe article!

****

But for now, once again:

Soy milk? Earth Balance buttery flavored spread? Vegan pudding?

All at Trader Joe’s! And they have organic (pesticide-free) veggies, too!

AND … their prices are great!

By buying vegan, you opt out of the cruel, cruel agribusiness!

Here is a chart to help you substitute vegan foods for hen, cow and pig when you’re baking/cooking up a storm! etc:

Vegan-Cooking-Tips

12 Reasons You May Never Want To Eat Turkey Again

Let’s REFORM AMERICAN FACTORY FARMS!  No more hormones, no more cramming and beating,  no more standing in filth, no more beak and claw removal WITHOUT ANESTHESIA!

When you don’t eat meat you don’t buy into the horrific suffering of cows, turkeys, chickens, calves, pigs, lambs on America’s factory farms!

Agribusiness is just that – a business.

YOU CAN  WORK WITH OUR POLITICIANS TO CHANGE THE BUSINESS! Please demand more oversight, demand LAWS that ensure a MODICUM OF HUMANITY IN A SYSTEM THAT LITERALLY DRIVES ANIMALS INSANE, A SYSTEM OF UNENDING PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL PAIN for animals.

God’s creatures, every one of them!

– Rosalie Tirella

From PETA.ORG:

Reason #2

Turkeys love to be patted! (To see the 11 other reasons. CLICK HERE!)

Many turkeys, even those who have known great cruelty at human hands, will happily sit for hours having their feathers stroked.

Loving Beatrice, a former factory farm turkey rescued by Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, is a huge snugglebug despite having been mutilated by humans as a baby. And Clove the turkey hen (pictured below) loves to cuddle with her rescuers at Animal Placesanctuary.

Clover the turkey vegan thanksgiving

 

Calves are born into a world of abuse

I’ve made some sections bold. -R.T.

By Dan Paden
 
Many consumers don’t realize (probably because they’ve never really thought about it) that cows produce milk for the same reason that human mothers do: to feed their babies.

Given the opportunity, cows are excellent mothers. They’re smart, sensitive animals, and their maternal instinct is just as strong as ours.
 
But on dairy farms, they are repeatedly impregnated and then forced to watch helplessly as their terrified babies — whom they carry for nine months, just like us — are torn away from them again and again.

In order to squeeze as much milk as possible out of them, dairy farms keep them almost constantly pregnant. They give birth to calf after calf, year in and year out.
 
This is just one reason why PETA urges consumers to ditch dairy products. Our latest eyewitness exposé of the dairy industry provides several more.
 
Daisy Farms, a Texas-based milk supplier to Daisy Brand sour cream and cottage cheese—which can be found in supermarkets all over the U.S.—claims that it has the “best cared-for cows on the planet.” It refers to them as “princesses,” “queens,” “our babies” and “our pets.” 
 
But after receiving a disturbing tip from a whistleblower who reported that many calves on this farm were visibly ill—coughing, trembling and/or unable to stand—we took a look ourselves and found that Daisy Farms is just a plain old, run-of-the-mill factory farm.
 
The cows are confined to massive sheds and some had no choice but to stand and lie down in their own waste.

PETA’s eyewitness saw workers put a rope around one cow’s head and pull her off a resting area. She slipped and fell on her udder on the slick feces-coated floor before being led away to be milked. 
 
Cows were kicked, whipped and jabbed with pens and a knife—even while they were in labor.

Workers twisted their tails, which can cause the animals severe pain and even break the bones inside.

Two cows with severe lacerations on their tails were not treated by a veterinarian, to the knowledge of PETA’s observer, including one whose wound was seen bleeding more than three weeks after her tail was severed.

Some sick cows were finally shot, while others were killed by injection to induce a heart attack—while they were fully conscious.
 
When cows at this farm had difficulty giving birth, workers used chains to drag their calves out of their wombs, causing them to cry out and defecate. The calves were not even allowed to nurse, because their mothers’ milk is sold
for human consumption. Instead, they are torn away from their mothers within hours of birth. Some are force-fed milk taken from another cow. Several newborn calves drowned when workers shoved tubes down their throats and milk was forced into their lungs instead of their stomachs.
 
Newborn calves also had holes punched into their ears and numbered tags clamped onto them, and their heads were smeared with a caustic paste to destroy their sensitive horn tissue—all without any painkillers. Nearly all cows born on dairy farms have tissue that will develop into horns if left alone, but most are cruelly “dehorned”—either via caustic paste, as in this case, or by other harsh methods such as gouging out the tissue with a sharp metal scoop as they struggle and cry out in pain.
 
When cows’ bodies wear out from constant pregnancy or lactation—after about five years—they are slaughtered.
PETA has said it before, but it’s worth repeating: The only way to ensure that no animals suffer for your sour cream, cheese, milk, ice cream and yogurt is to go vegan. By choosing kinder, plant-based options, like almond and soy milk, vegan cheese and sour cream, coconut-milk coffee creamer and cashew-milk ice cream, we can let animals live in peace.

Don’t say cheese: de-horning is dairy’s dirty secret

By David Byer

Some readers may be surprised to learn that although PETA is best known for its stunts, provocative ads and “rather go naked than wear fur” demonstrations, we have purchased stock in dozens of companies as part of our effort to eliminate practices that cause animals to suffer. PETA purchases or accepts donations of small amounts of stock in companies to gain access to annual meetings and similar events, which allows us to appeal to the corporate leadership, board members and other stockholders and submit shareholder resolutions.

Recently, PETA has been using the leverage of our stock ownership to try to eradicate one of the dairy industry’s dark secrets: a painful procedure known as “dehorning,” in which cows’ sensitive horn tissue—or the developing horns themselves—are burned or cut out of their heads. We have presented resolutions at the annual meetings of Dean Foods, Papa John’s and Domino’s urging them to require suppliers to phase out dehorning in favor of instead selecting for naturally hornless (or “polled”) cattle.

Of course, you’d never know that nearly all cows born on dairy farms have tissue that will develop into horns because most farmers destroy that tissue or excise developing horns from the cows’ skulls. This procedure is extremely traumatic to calves, who are as young as a few days old when their horn buds are painfully removed. During disbudding, workers commonly burn searing-hot irons into calves’ heads, sometimes damaging the underlying bone of their skulls. Other methods involve using a caustic chemical paste to dissolve the tissue or simply cutting it out with knives or other tools.

Older cows have it even worse since dehorning in mature cattle typically involves cutting off the horn, which has already taken root in the skull. Tools used for this procedure include saws, gougers, sharp wires or gruesome guillotine dehorners, which may also cut off the surrounding skin. Horn removal can lead to postoperative problems, including hemorrhaging, tissue necrosis, bone fracture, sinusitis and even death. The wound caused by this amputation can take months to heal.

The animals subjected to dehorning often struggle desperately, thrashing, tossing their heads, rearing up, bellowing and collapsing to the ground—all signs of severe pain and distress that also increase the risk of additional trauma and blood loss. The excruciating process is routinely performed without anesthetics or painkillers.

One recent study from Texas Tech University found that calves who had been dehorned were observed to engage in abnormal behaviors indicative of stress, such as head-shaking and reduced grooming and eating time following the procedure. The study also noted that calves who had been painfully dehorned lost approximately 1 percent of their bodyweight by the next day.

Breeding for polled cattle is better for cows’ well-being. It’s also more efficient for producers since they will no longer need to spend time dehorning or risk setbacks caused by damage to the animals’ physical and emotional health.

Dairy farmers breed their cows regularly to keep them lactating, typically using artificial insemination. Just as farmers select for traits such as coat color, they can select for the hornless gene, and since the gene is dominant, at least half of a polled bull’s offspring will be hornless. Over time, the entire herd can become polled as a result of a regular breeding program, without the need for structural or operational changes—except, of course, for eliminating dehorning, which many workers admit is the worst job on the farm.

PETA will continue to urge the dairy industry and its largest corporate clients to do the responsible and sensible thing by replacing cruel dehorning with breeding for polled cattle, as is already widely practiced in the beef industry. Concerned consumers can help calves on dairy farms by choosing nondairy beverages and foods, such as milks, cheeses, yogurts and ice creams made from soy, coconut, rice, almonds, oats and other natural plant sources.

Dairy farm abuses hard to swallow

By Daphna Nachminovitch

A recent Washington Post article about safety concerns in the food industry revealed that the plants that process dairy products are inspected, on average, once every decade. You read that right: once every decade.

While the FDA, which regulates dairy plants, is under pressure to overhaul its inspection procedures, a new undercover investigation by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) shows that more oversight is also needed on the farms themselves.

A PETA investigator spent three months working at a New York dairy farm that supplies Agri-Mark, which makes Cabot and McCadam cheeses. Cows on this farm were jabbed and struck, even in the udder, with poles and canes. Young calves bellowed and thrashed as workers burned their horn buds—without providing any pain relief—in order to stop their horns from growing. Such atrocities should make any caring person think twice about buying cow’s milk and cheese.

PETA’s investigator documented one farm manager as he repeatedly electro-shocked a cow in the face. The same man also jabbed another cow, who was unable to stand, in the ribs with a screwdriver and used a skid steer to drag her 25 feet.

Supervisors failed to provide veterinary care or euthanasia to cows who were suffering from bloody vaginal prolapses. One boss said “we do nothing” for such cows, and indeed, the animals’ exposed, pus- and manure-covered tissue was left untreated for months. He added that when a cow’s “whole uterus comes out” during calving, farm workers simply push it back in and hope that the animal lives “long enough for the beef truck to come get her.”

Another manager, a layperson, laughingly admitted that he had plunged a long needle into “the wrong organ” of one cow when trying to penetrate her stomach. Twelve days later, evidently not having recovered and no longer useful to the dairy farm, the cow was loaded onto a truck and sent to a slaughterhouse.

Some of the abuses that we documented are standard practice in the dairy industry. For example, workers wrapped tight bands around calves’ tails in order to cause the tissue to die and fall off, a cruel procedure that results in acute and chronic pain. Workers used “guns” to artificially inseminate cows and injected cows with bovine growth hormone, or BGH, to increase their milk production. BGH contributes to an extremely painful udder infection called “mastitis,” and cows tested positive for it almost daily.

PETA is calling for appropriate disciplinary action—including termination—against all workers who abused or neglected animals at this farm. We’re also asking Agri-Mark to implement a number of new polices immediately, including phasing out all forms of dehorning, such as the burning of horn buds on calves’ heads, and banning the use of electric-shock devices.

These changes will eliminate some of the most egregious forms of cruelty to cows on Agri-Mark member farms. But they won’t eliminate all of them.

As long as consumers continue to purchase dairy products instead of healthier options such as almond milk and soy cheese, animals will continue to suffer. Mother cows will continue to watch helplessly as their calves—whom they carry for nine months, just like us—are torn away from them again and again, which is acutely distressing to both cow and calf. They will continue to go lame from intense confinement and filthy surroundings. And they will continue to be trucked to slaughter and ground up for burgers and dog food when their worn-out bodies are no longer of any use to farmers.

If you find such cruelty hard to swallow, the solution is simple: Dump dairy from your diet.