Tag Archives: debt

Will it be Medicaid or millionaires? MA residents call on Senator Scott Brown to choose!

Boston – With the clock running out on the debt debate, US Senator Scott Brown has yet to state his position on more than $500 billion in proposed healthcare cuts. Medicaid recipients, providers and advocates were set to call the question today (Thursday) in front of Brown’s downtown Boston office!

Will It Be Medicaid or Millionaires?

Boston Residents called on Scott Brown to Choose

While politicians trade horses over the national debt in Washington, those directly affected in Massachusetts are demanding to know where their Senator stands on the critical issues in negotiation.

A coalition of local Medicaid recipients, providers and advocates gathered today to ask a simple question of US Senator Scott Brown: “Will you choose Medicaid or Millionaires?” The call comes after weeks of silence from Brown on a proposed $500 billion cut to healthcare – cuts that jeopardize vital Medical Assistance funding while tax cuts for the ultra-wealthy enjoy a vigorous defense by many in Brown’s own party.

“Medicaid allows me to live independently in my home, and I depend on that funding every single day,” said David Sandison of Waltham. “I deserve to know. Will Scott Brown support me or the millionaires?”

Sandison this morning joined Stacy Hart of the Boston Center for Independent Living, healthcare advocate Amy Whitcomb Slemmer, business owner Joseph Rotella and others who demanded answers from Brown on the issue of Medicaid funding.

Whatcha gonna do, Scott Brown?

A progressive’s view of the federal and MA state budgets

By Grace Ross

Doing the same thing and expecting a different result is that fabulous definition of crazy. Yet economically as a state and nationally as a country, we continue the same economic policies somehow expecting that the ones that got us into this economic crisis are going to get us out.

One of my pet peeves is elected officials who seem to think that their responsibility as our representatives is to balance the budget of the level of the government to which they were elected. In fact, every single one of us elected these folks expecting them to have an eye on their district’s economy as a whole and balance their level of government’s budget so as to improve our economic lives and realities not just their “isolated” bottom line.

We all knew that the federal government should not give money to the very banks that got us into this mess. Instead, Congress lent not just hundreds of billions publicly but the Federal Reserve Bank lent them tens of trillions guaranteed by us taxpayers. Yet, we knew the big banks still would not rewrite all the bad mortgages or lend so our small businesses survive.

Obviously, our elected leaders need a complete rethink of the purpose and focus of government budgets: what makes our economy thrive and what doesn’t, not satisfying the economic desires of a few.

It’s staggering to hear our present governor, Deval Patrick, express such outrage that Fidelity now plans to take 1,000 jobs out of state. Surprised? We’ve just been through the whole debacle of the $56 Million Evergreen Solar infrastructure and tax sweetheart deal. They are a local grown business that could have played a central role in rebuilding manufacturing in one of the few growing sectors: green energy. But like most corporate money deals, Evergreen was not actually bound to anything for our state residents; that same money could have subsidized regular people being able to afford solar panels and thus create a burgeoning market to incentivize Evergreen to manufacture and create jobs here! (Of course, the Governor himself is planning to cut more jobs.)

In the 1990s, our legislature passed whole sector tax cuts: the military industrial sector break (known as the “Raytheon tax” break) and the financial sector break known as, you guessed it, the “Fidelity tax” break. These tax breaks were sold as keeping (maybe creating) jobs in Massachusetts. History, however, shows that these jobs have dwindled in our state since those tax breaks. Studies also show that companies don’t move somewhere primarily for tax incentives. Continue reading A progressive’s view of the federal and MA state budgets