Tag Archives: hunger in Worcester

Jimmy! Always in style! … Congressman McGovern Praises Food Banks for Innovative Solutions to Hunger, Highlights Need for Strong Investment in Anti-Hunger Programs

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McGovern
Go, Congressman McGovern, go!!!

Today Congressman Jim McGovern spoke on the House Floor about the important role that food banks in Massachusetts, like Worcester County Food Bank and the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts, and food banks across the country play in helping families and communities struggling with hunger. Congressman McGovern spoke about volunteering this past summer at Philabundance, a Philadelphia-area food bank, as well as the importance of supporting local food banks and strengthening federal anti-hunger programs as part of a comprehensive strategy to end hunger.

“Food banks across our country, like Philabundance, and the Worcester County Food Bank and Food Bank of Western Massachusetts – both located in my Congressional district – do incredible work to reduce hunger in surrounding communities. They employ innovative strategies to fight hunger and increase access to nutritious food for our most vulnerable neighbors.

“The truth of the matter is, we know that food banks and other charitable organizations can’t do it alone. Some in Congress have proposed cuts and other restrictions to our federal anti-hunger and nutrition programs, we often hear from them that charities – not the government – should be responsible for eradicating hunger.

“I agree that food banks and food pantries, and other charitable organizations are incredible on-the-ground partners in our efforts to end hunger. They are often the first line of defense in emergency situations.

“Our charities are doing an incredible job on the front lines, but ending hunger will take a strong partnership between these organizations and federal, state, and local governments. We know that strong federal investments in these critical safety net programs reduce hunger, improve the diets of low-income households, and save billions of dollars in health care costs.

“So the next time my colleagues look to score political points by demonizing our federal anti-hunger programs, I ask you to think about these programs and the impact they are having on constituents in each of our districts.”

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Full Text of Congressman McGovern’s Speech:

“I recently had the opportunity to visit and volunteer at the Philadelphia region’s largest hunger relief center – Philabundance.

“Philabundance, a member of the Feeding America network of food banks, aims to drive hunger out of local communities with an eye toward eradicating hunger altogether.

“Each week, Philabundance serves 90,000 people in the Philadelphia area through partnership with 350 agencies and food distribution programs.

“Incredibly, last year alone, they distributed almost 30 million pounds of food to neighbors suffering from hunger and food insecurity in nine counties.

“I was impressed by the innovative strategies Philabundance employs to feed hungry people in its region. The Philabundance Community Kitchen equips those looking to re-enter the workforce with valuable life and kitchen skills while also providing meals to those in need.

“Philabundance also opened the nation’s first nonprofit grocery store – called Fare & Square – in Chester, a city that faced a serious economic downturn due to the loss of manufacturing jobs. Fare & Square provides affordable and healthy food to the community, as well as discounts to those who qualify.

“Food banks across our country, like Philabundance, and the Worcester County Food Bank and Food Bank of Western Massachusetts – both located in my Congressional district – do incredible work to reduce hunger in surrounding communities.

“They employ innovative strategies to fight hunger and increase access to nutritious food for our most vulnerable neighbors.

“The truth of the matter is, we know that food banks and other charitable organizations can’t do it alone.

“Some in Congress have proposed cuts and other restrictions to our federal anti-hunger and nutrition programs, we often hear from them that charities – not the government – should be responsible for eradicating hunger.

“I agree that food banks and food pantries, and other charitable organizations are incredible on-the-ground partners in our efforts to end hunger. They are often the first line of defense in emergency situations.

“But charities cannot do everything. Such are the facts. Charities do face limitations. Many are small and only open on limited schedules. Most are run with the support of dedicated volunteers, some of whom have other full time jobs.

“Often, these charities operate out of small spaces like basements or closets at houses of worship. And importantly, they rely on donations from members of the community as a primary source of food to distribute.

“Our charities are doing an incredible job on the front lines, but ending hunger will take a strong partnership between these organizations and federal, state, and local governments.

“For our part, the federal government must continue to invest in our preeminent food and nutrition programs like SNAP, WIC, and The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), just to name a few, and fight attempts to cut or weaken them. TEFAP is especially important to our food banks, as they rely on this federal funding to serve those in need.

“We know that strong federal investments in these critical safety net programs reduce hunger, improve the diets of low-income households, and save billions of dollars in health care costs.

“So the next time my colleagues look to score political points by demonizing our federal anti-hunger programs, I ask you to think about these programs and the impact they are having on constituents in each of our districts.

“I urge you to visit your local food banks and charities, and see all of the incredible work they are doing to reduce hunger in our communities. Ask these organizations how the federal anti-poverty programs support their efforts to bring food to those most in need.

“And I urge all my colleagues to remember this fact: Today in the United States of America, the richest country in the world, over 42 million of our fellow citizens are hungry. They are kids. They are senior citizens. They are people who can’t find work and they are many, many people who are, in fact, working. They defy stereotypes. All of them are our brothers and sisters and we should care. And we should absolutely do more than we are doing right now to end hunger in America.

“The federal government, working with charities and local partners, has within our grasp the power to end hunger now. What we lack is the political will. Let’s at long last create the political will and guarantee that in our country, no one ever has to struggle with food insecurity or hunger. We can end hunger now.”

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Right now! Free fruits and veggies at St. John’s church – Temple St. … and a word from Congressman McGovern on Starbucks’ efforts to reduce hunger!

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TODAY AND EVERY SATURDAY!!!

9:30 A.M. TO 11:30 A.M.

AT ST. JOHN’S CHURCH!

20 Temple St.

FREE FRUIT AND VEGETABLES!

For you – and your children!!!

THANK YOU STOP AND SHOP!!!!

Free fresh fruits and vegetables will now be available from 9:30 to 11:30 Saturday mornings at the St. Francis Xavier Center soup kitchen.

St. John’s Church

20 Temple St.

The St. Francis Xavier Center also has a food pantry and serves hot breakfasts, Mon. – Fri.

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Jim thanking Starbucks for helping feed the hungry!

Congressman McGovern Praises Starbucks for Donating Surplus Food to Help Reduce Hunger and Food Waste

Congressman Jim McGovern delivered this week a speech on the House Floor in honor of Hunger Action Month to praise Starbucks for its FoodShare program.

It’s a new initiative to donate unused food to help reduce food waste and work with local food banks to reduce hunger in communities across the country.

At a local Starbucks on Capitol Hill, Congressman McGovern joined Congresswoman Lynn Jenkins (R-KS), his fellow co-chair of the bipartisan House Hunger Caucus, to learn more about the program and how it will contribute to the national effort to help the 47 million Americans who struggle with hunger every day.

Full Text of Today’s Speech is Below:

“To kick off Hunger Action Month, today I joined Representative Lynn Jenkins of Kansas on a tour of the Starbucks on Capitol Hill to learn about an innovative partnership between Feeding America and Starbucks to donate unused food.

“At the end of each day, Starbucks will package surplus ready-to-eat food that gets picked up overnight and delivered to local food banks.

“I was impressed by the selection of nutritious food. We often think of Starbucks as a place to stop for a coffee, but we saw a number of healthy options like salads, sandwiches, and more.

“Starbucks will expand the project to all its stores in the next few years. They expect to donate 50 million meals annually, diverting 60 million pounds of surplus food away from landfills and to hungry families in need.

“More than 47 million Americans suffer from hunger and food insecurity. In the richest country in the world, we must do all we can to ensure that no family goes hungry and donating unused food is a key step.

“Starbucks deserves much credit for being a leader in the effort to end hunger.”

FROM STARBUCKS.COM:

FoodShare: Hunger relief in action

Starbucks Announces Program to Donate Ready-to-Eat Meals to Food Banks
Did you know that:

1 in 7 Americans are food insecure

Food waste accounts for 20 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions

Almost 40% of food is lost between farm & fork

In the spirit of Our Mission and Values, partners across the country advocated for a solution to donate unsold food to the communities we serve. Through a new and unique strategic partnership with Feeding America, we will rescue 100% of food available to donate from all of our U.S. stores, positioning Starbucks as the sector leader in food rescue.

At scale, Starbucks will:

Support 100% store participation in food donation

Provide 50 million meals annually

Divert 60 million pounds of food waste from landfills

Lead a coalition of like-minded brands in the fight against hunger

How can you get involved?

Be an advocate for the fight against hunger

Make a contribution

Lead a service project

Visit www.feedingamerica.org/take-action/volunteer to learn how you can volunteer at your local food bank.

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And…

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Today and every Saturday!!! 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. …at the mighty St. John’s church! The beginnings of a FOOD HUB???

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FREE!

EVERY SATURDAY MORNING

at ST. JOHN’S CHURCH

TEMPLE STREET

FREE FRUIT AND VEGETABLES!

For you – and your children!!!

THANK YOU STOP AND SHOP!!!!

Free fresh fruits and vegetables will now be available from 9:30 to 11:30 Saturday mornings at the St. Francis Xavier Center soup kitchen.

St. John’s Church

20 Temple St.

The St. Francis Xavier Center also has a food pantry and serves hot breakfasts, Mon. – Fri.

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Also, today! 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. REC’s Farmers Market at Crystal Park, Main Street!

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Go, REC, go!!!!

– R.T.

Thursday Congressman McGovern visits a food hub!

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Rosalie – and lots of her neighbors – would buy their produce at a Food Hub. (Rosalie’s shack!) pic:R.T.

Congressman McGovern will praise the work Daily Table is doing to help local families and highlight it as a model for other communities!

This Thursday!

DORCHESTER

2:15 PM – 3:15 PM

Visit of Daily Table Grocery

Congressman McGovern visits Daily Table Grocery, a not-for-profit retail store that offers our community a variety of affordable and healthy food for low-income families and works with a large network of growers, supermarkets, manufacturers, and other suppliers who donate their excess, healthy food in an attempt to help reduce food waste. Congressman McGovern will praise the work Daily Table is doing to help local families and highlight it as a model for other communities.

WHO: Congressman Jim McGovern (MA-02), Daily Table Founder and President Doug Rauch, Community Leaders and Anti-Hunger Advocates

WHERE: Daily Table Grocery, 450 Washington Street, Dorchester

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Reposting Congressman McGovern’s speech: America Spends $218 Billion Every Year on Food That Is Never Eaten

Reducing Food Waste Is Key to Helping 50 million Americans Struggling with Hunger

Congressman Jim McGovern recently spoke on the House Floor to raise awareness about food waste in the U.S. and to praise efforts in Massachusetts and across the country to reduce food waste and help the 50 million Americans – including 16 million children – who struggle with hunger every year.

“American consumers, businesses, and farms spend an estimated $218 billion per year growing, processing, transporting, and disposing of food that is never eaten. Up to 40 percent of all food grown is never eaten,” Congressman McGovern said. “Forty to fifty million tons of food is sent to landfills each year, plus another 10 million tons is left unharvested on farms. This food waste translates into approximately 387 billion calories of food that went unconsumed.

“With 50 million Americans – including 16 million children –struggling with hunger every year, these are startling figures,” McGovern added. “We know food waste occurs throughout the supply chain – from harvesting to manufacturing to retail operations and consumer habits. We must do more to reduce food waste at every stage, recover food that would have otherwise been wasted, and recycle unavoidable waste as animal feed, compost, or energy.

“Thankfully, there’s already a lot of great work being done to raise awareness about the problem of food waste,” McGovern concluded. “I’m pleased to see so many partners at every level of the food supply chain taking action to reduce food waste, but still, more needs to be done. Let’s solve the problem of food waste and let’s end hunger now.”

In his speech, Congressman McGovern recognized Massachusetts leaders and organizations like the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts for helping to reduce food waste as part of the larger push to tackle hunger. McGovern also thanked Becker College, College of the Holy Cross, Smith College, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute for their work with the Campus Kitchen Project and the Food Recovery Network to provide hunger relief in their local communities through campus food recovery initiatives.

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Full Text of Congressman McGovern’s Speech:

“Thousands of people will gather in Washington, D.C. this week for “Feeding the 5000” – an event designed to bring awareness to the issue of food waste.

“Participants will be served a communal meal made entirely out of food that would otherwise have been discarded – in other words, wasted.

“Since 2009, Feedback, a global environmental organization working to end food waste, has hosted dozens of “Feeding the 5000” events in cities across the globe.

“I’m pleased to see so many local partners – including government agencies, charitable organizations, NGOs, industry, and chefs – joining together to call attention to food waste.

“Because the truth of the matter is, we’ll need all of these partners working together to solve the issue of food waste.

“Last year, the USDA announced their first-ever food waste reduction goal, calling for a 50 percent reduction in food waste by 2030. USDA is working with charitable organizations, faith-based groups, and the private sector and I believe this goal is 100 percent achievable.

“American consumers, businesses, and farms spend an estimated $218 billion per year growing, processing, transporting, and disposing of food that is never eaten.

“Up to 40 percent of all food grown is never eaten. Forty to fifty million tons of food is sent to landfills each year, plus another 10 million tons is left unharvested on farms.

“This food waste translates into approximately 387 billion calories of food that went unconsumed.

“With 50 million Americans – including 16 million children –struggling with hunger every year, these are startling figures.

“We know food waste occurs throughout the supply chain – from harvesting to manufacturing to retail operations and consumer habits. We must do more to reduce food waste at every stage, recover food that would have otherwise been wasted, and recycle unavoidable waste as animal feed, compost, or energy.

“Thankfully, there’s already a lot of great work being done to raise awareness about the problem of food waste.

“Just last week I attended a screening of the documentary film, Just Eat It at Amherst Cinema, organized by the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts. Just Eat It follows a couple, Jen and Grant, as they stop going to the grocery store and live solely off of foods that would have been thrown away. Jen and Grant were able to find an abundance of perfectly safe and healthy food available for consumption that would have been thrown away.

“It’s exciting to see new partnerships forming to study food waste and find ways to use this perfectly good food to reduce hunger in our communities.

“One such private-public collaboration, ReFED, has brought together over 30 business, government, and NGO leaders committed to wide-scale solutions to U.S. food waste.

“In March, 2016, ReFED released a Roadmap that charts the course for a 20 percent reduction of food waste within a decade.

“The Roadmap calls for farmers to reduce unharvested food and create secondary markets for imperfect produce. It calls on manufacturers to reduce inefficiencies, make packaging adjustments, and standardize date labeling. It calls on food service companies to further implement waste tracking and incorporate imperfect produce and smaller plates into restaurants. And it urges the federal government to strengthen tax incentives for food donation and consider standardized date labeling legislation.

“The good news is that many in the industry are already taking steps to dramatically cut down on wasted food by implementing robust donation programs.

“For example, Starbucks recently announced it will soon scale up its successful food donation pilot program nationwide. In partnership with the Food Donation Connection and Feeding America, Starbucks will donate unsold food from more than 7,000 company-operated stores –salads, sandwiches, and other refrigerated items – to the Feeding America food bank network. By 2021, that amounts to almost 50 million meals.

“Our college campuses are also stepping up. Both the Campus Kitchen Project and the Food Recovery Network work with college dining facilities and students to provide hunger relief in their local communities. In my congressional district, Becker College, College of the Holy Cross, Smith College, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute all have campus food recovery initiatives.

“Over the past 35 years, Feeding America has demonstrated an outstanding commitment to ensuring food that would have otherwise been wasted makes its way to food banks across the country and into the homes of families in need.

“There are dozens of other industry leaders also taking steps to reduce food waste by implementing manufacturing upgrades, maximizing harvests, and utilizing recycling initiatives.

“I appreciate the efforts of the Food Waste Reduction Alliance in bringing together industry partners to reduce food waste, shrink the environmental footprint, and alleviate hunger in our communities.

“Reducing food waste is one step we can take toward our goal of ending hunger in the United States and throughout the world.

“I’m pleased to see so many partners at every level of the food supply chain taking action to reduce food waste, but still, more needs to be done. Let’s solve the problem of food waste and let’s end hunger now.”

Hooray!!! Kudos to all involved!!!! … Supporting local farmers! Supporting the working class and poor! FRESH PRODUCE AND MORE VIA WORCESTER’S NEW FOOD HUB!!!

The Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce (Chamber) and the Regional Environmental Council of Central MA (REC) are pleased to announce continued funding for their food hub partnership.
 
In 2015, the Chamber and the REC embarked on a yearlong assessment to determine the feasibility of establishing a food hub in the Worcester region.

Food hubs are broadly defined as facilities that manage the aggregation, storage, processing, distribution, or marketing of locally and regionally produced food. A food hub provides better consumer access to fresh, locally grown food and a larger consumer market for the region’s farmers.
 
At the conclusion of the study, an application was submitted to The Health Foundation for funding of a pilot year. A slate of programs falling into three categories have been identified for the pilot grant year.

These initiatives will:

support healthy local food access

job creation

economic development

While the food hub currently has no official headquarters, much of the pilot year activities will be operated out of the Worcester County Food Bank in, Shrewsbury.
 
“Food is fundamental to our lives. We all eat, and we all want to eat fresh healthy food. So, ease of access to affordable healthy food is critically important to us, regardless of our station in life. Yet, it is estimated that 90 percent of the food we eat in New England comes from somewhere else,” stated Dr. Jan Yost, president of The Health Foundation of Central Massachusetts. “Thus, the Foundation is pleased to announce a grant of $423,235 to the Regional Environmental Council of Central Massachusetts to partner with the Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce to pilot a regional food hub.”

Yost went on to explain that, “Today 80 percent of the land in New England is covered with forest, much of which used to be farmland. Researchers suggest that by 2060, New England could expand its farmland to 6 million acres, or 15 percent of the entire land mass, which would enable New England to grow half of its own food.”
 
“The Worcester County Food Bank is the region’s largest anti-hunger organization, annually distributing nearly 6 million pounds of donated fresh and non-perishable food to a network of 131 Partner Agencies that help feed hungry people”, said Jean McMurray, Worcester County Food Bank’s Executive Director. 

She continued: “We are proud to host the Food Hub’s pilot year because we believe that healthy food grown and processed by community members benefits the entire community, including those struggling with poverty and hunger.”
 
Responsibility for pilot year activities will be split among the partner organizations, with the REC leading efforts to create opportunities for healthy eating via marketing, aggregation, and distribution of local farm products to institutional food service providers at area schools, colleges, and hospitals.

An initial group of eight to ten small to mid-sized family farms will be involved in these activities during the pilot year and four to five institutional buyers will be purchasing local farm products via the food hub.

The food hub will also be working to enhance healthy, local food offerings through the REC’s existing Mobile Farmers Market and through the City of Worcester Division of Public Health’s Mass In Motion Healthy Corner Store initiative.
 
”The REC has been working with organizational partners and grassroots community members for decades to help make healthy, local food universally accessible in the Greater Worcester area,” said Steve Fischer, REC Executive Director. “We are thrilled at the prospect that a regional food hub could help create a regional food system that is increasingly based on principles of economic and social justice and environmental sustainability. Working together, we have an opportunity to make healthy food more accessible while supporting local farmers, growing the economy, creating jobs, and preserving the environment.”
 
The Chamber will oversee food hub activities operated through a Commercial Kitchen Incubator to be located at the Worcester County Food Bank. During the pilot year, the Chamber will spearhead the recruitment of potential tenants including farmers, budding food entrepreneurs, small culinary businesses looking to take the next step in their development, and even home cooks looking to scale up a long-held family recipe.
 
“Given the success of last year’s planning grant process, we are excited to move forward with this pilot year that will set the stage for long-term success,” stated Chamber president and CEO Timothy P. Murray. “Our efforts with the commercial kitchen fit into our working motto of recruit, retain and incubate. Incubating the next generation of food entrepreneurs will help them turn their passion into a career, add to the region’s growing food economy, and result in a healthier population in Worcester and Central Massachusetts.”
 
The final piece of the pilot year project is a culinary training program that will be overseen by Quinsigamond Community College (QCC).

QCC expects to train at least 2 cohorts of 8-10 students and to provide job placement at area restaurants, caterers and institutional food service providers.

This new certificate program will target students who are members of vulnerable populations in Worcester County and who have previously experienced barriers to employment.
 
Dale Allen, QCC’s vice president for community engagement stated “Quinsigamond Community College is excited about being selected as a key partner in this grant. We are committed to supporting program activities that will increase access to healthy, fresh foods for underserved neighborhoods in our city. This program will be modeled after QCC’s successful ‘Cooking Up a Culinary Career’ program which has been offered for the past several years through the Worcester Youth Center and Hector Reyes House. We look forward to working with the Regional Environmental Council and Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce to expand access to healthy food and economic self-sufficiency for vulnerable populations in Worcester County.”
 
All of the pilot activities will be carefully evaluated and measured by an evaluation team from John Snow Inc., a health consultant company. Working closely with the grant management team throughout the pilot year JSI will continually evaluate the activities to provide real time feedback. The success of the outcomes of the various aspects of the piloted activities will be key to determining how the food hub operates after the pilot year.
 
The Food Hub project will hire a full-time operations manager to oversee the day-to-day aspects of the project during the pilot year.

Other partners collaborating on the project include Central Mass Grown, World Farmers/Flats Mentor Farm, Worcester Public Schools, Pepper’s Fine Catering, UMass Amherst Stockbridge School of Agricultural Extension, Worcester Division of Public Health and the Community Harvest Project.

Clark University parked in A.I!

Feb. 18

FREE!

At Clark University: A social entrepreneur’s approach to 
hunger and wasted food
 

Former president of Trader Joe’s to present Clark U President’s Lecture
 
Social entrepreneur Doug Rauch will speak at Clark University at 4 p.m., on Thursday, February 18, in Razzo Hall in the Traina Center for the Arts, 92 Downing St.

Part of the President’s Lecture Series at Clark University, “A Social Entrepreneur’s Approach to Hunger and Wasted Food,” is free and open to the public.    
 
Rauch is founder and president of the Daily Table, an innovative retail concept designed to bring affordable nutrition to the food insecure in our cities through using the excess, wholesome food that would otherwise be wasted by growers, manufacturers, distributors and retailers.

It offers “grab-n-go” meals, freshly prepared on-site, as well as a variety of healthy grocery items (produce, dairy, bakery, etc.) at prices that meet or beat less nutritious food costs. 

Rauch spent 31 years with Trader Joe’s Company, the last 14 years as its president, helping grow the business from a small, nine-store chain in Southern California to a nationally acclaimed retail success story with more than 340 stores in 30 states.

He developed their prized buying philosophy, created their unique private label food program, and wrote and executed the business plan for expanding Trader Joe’s nationally. He retired from the company in 2008.

Rauch is also CEO of Conscious Capitalism Inc.; a Trustee at Olin College of Engineering; on the Board of Overseers at WBUR; and serves on the board of several for-profit and nonprofit companies. 

Rauch received his Executive M.B.A. from the Peter Drucker School of Management at Claremont University, where he won several honorary awards including the Early Career Outstanding Entrepreneur Award from Peter Drucker.  Rauch was also a recent Fellow at the Harvard Advanced Leadership Initiative, where Daily Table was hatched.

BE THERE!!
 

United Way of Central Mass. event and STAMP OUT HUNGER

In just a week, on Tuesday, May 12 …

the United Way of Central Massachusetts will hold its Annual Community Celebration; the 95th such gathering that we have held.

Meeting at historic Mechanics Hall here in Worcester. Registration begins at 4 pm; program commences at 4:30 pm.

Celebrating the accomplishments of individuals and organizations who have made a difference in the life of OUR community.

Join with us as we bring recognition to such wonderful Worcester citizens as:

Saul Feingold

Marie and Mike Angelini

Scott Conti … and more! 

Join with us as we celebrate the achievements of:

One City One Library

Paul Cummings – a VITA volunteer

The Pink Volunteers of Reliant.

Celebration will open with a fantastic group called “Fools On the Hill”!

Tuesday, May 12, at Mechanics Hall; please RSVP to: cmcmanus@unitedwaycm.org

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This Saturday, May 9

USPS Letter Carriers Food Drive, “Stamp Out Hunger”

This April the Massachusetts Law Reform Institute released a report telling us that Worcester gained in ‘food hardship’ and …

One in five households in Worcester now struggle to put meals on the table.

It is easy to participate in “Stamp Out Hunger” – anywhere in America, for it is our country’s largest food drive.

This week peruse through your food cabinet, select nonperishable items (NOT expired) that you would be willing to share – to donate.

Place those food items in a bag or bags. Put the bags in or next to your mailbox early Saturday morning.

Your letter carrier/mail delivery person will collect the donated food and deliver it to a local food pantry or food bank.

In Worcester last year close to 400,000 pounds of food were collected.

And the need continues to grow. THANK YOU for choosing to participate in Stamp Out Hunger!

From Hunger-Free Worcester

Please complete this survey to inform the Massachusetts Food System Plan!

Every voice must be heard as we develop solutions to inadequate access to healthy food.

It is available in English and Spanish.

If you do complete this survey, please take into account the role that wages play in access to food. Minimum wage/low-wage jobs don’t support access to healthy food.  Healthy food isn’t expensive; unhealthy food is cheap and jobs don’t pay enough.

The Food Access, Security and Health Survey link:

(English): https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MassFoodPlan_FASH_English

The Massachusetts Food System Plan will emphasize state-level recommendations to strengthen our food system.

The Plan will identify strategies to “reduce hunger and food insecurity” and “increase the availability of fresh, healthy food to all residents” among other goals.

We are seeking your insight into the challenges and solutions that you see with respect to obtaining healthy food and/or food that is produced locally (within Massachusetts or New England).  Your responses will help us develop recommendations to be included in the Massachusetts Food System Plan, which will come out in early 2016.

The survey will be open until Friday, February 27, 2015.

If you know of other people who are working on this topic and would have information to share, please feel free to send them the survey invitation and link.

For more information, please visit the Massachusetts Food System Plan website at:http://www.mafoodplan.org/

Invitacion: Por favor completo Encuesta de Acceso Alimenticio, Seguridad y Salud.

Escuesta (Espanol):  https://es.surveymonkey.com/s/MassFoodPlan_FASH_Spanish

Esta encuesta estará abierta hasta el 4 de Marcha del 2015.

Liz Sheehan Castro
Worcester Food & Active Living Policy Council