Tag Archives: impeach Trump

AMERICAN IDEALS – AMERICA! – always in style! (especially in Worcester😄)

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TOMORROW! Tuesday, Jan. 31

Before the Worcester City Council meeting!

6 p.m.

WORCESTER CITY HALL – Main Street

BE THERE!

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pic: R.T.

This demonstration, in support of Worcester’s immigrants and refugees, is to show THE CITY AND THE WORLD that Donald Trump and City Councilor Michael Gaffney’s hate-filled demagoguery has no place in Worcester! They will not score political points with our most vulnerable people – most of them women and children (under 12 years of age!)!

Let’s stop the madness in Worcester!

This demonstration is organized by Showing Up for Racial Justice Worcester. To learn more and sign up, check out their FB page!

Go, Worcester, go!

Go, Mayor Petty, go!

GO, AMERICA, GO!!!!!!!!!

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pic: R.T.

– Rosalie Tirella

At Clark U in Main South: What’s so funny?!😄😂😜

But first …

From Bill Maher:

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Clark University’s Higgins School of Humanities’ spring dialogue symposium asks ‘What’s so funny?’

Lectures, exhibits and films examine how humor connects and divides

This spring, Clark University’s Higgins School for Humanities presents “What’s so funny?” a symposium that comprises lectures, community conversations and exhibits on humor.

“Our symposium asks how humor creates and fragments communities. What larger cultural, social, and political role does humor play? In short, what can we learn when we take jokes, comedy, and laughter seriously?” wrote Amy Richter, director of the Higgins School of Humanities.

All events listed below are FREE TO ALL and will be held on the Clark University campus:

Lecture

“The Science of Laughter”
7 p.m.
Wednesday, February 1
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
British neuroscientist and stand-up comedian Sophie Scott (University College London) will discuss the sometimes surprising science and evolution of laughter—an emotion with its roots in play and social bonding. She will explore questions such as: How and why do humans laugh? What do brain studies reveal about laughter? What happens when laughter goes wrong? This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Frances L. Hiatt School of Psychology at Clark.

Lecture and exhibition

“Cartooning; Sense, Nonsense, Applications”
4 p.m.
Tuesday, February 7
Exhibition runs from Tuesday, Feb. 7, through Monday, May 22
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Cartoonists James Sturm and Caleb Brown will look beyond graphic novels and iconic characters to emphasize cartooning’s ability to communicate complex information quickly and effectively, share powerful and precise visual narratives, and engage readers of all ages, nationalities, and socio-economic backgrounds.
Sturm, cofounder of The Center for Cartoon Studies, will curate an accompanying exhibit on “applied cartooning.” The selected images will highlight the ways the medium itself is being used to innovate and problem-solve in medicine, business, education, and other fields.
This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, Difficult Dialogues, and the Media, Culture and the Arts Program.

Lecture

“Dark Humor and the African American Image”
7 p.m.
Thursday, February 16
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Scholar and curator Tiffany E. Barber will draw upon her recent exhibition, “Dark Humor: African American Art from the University of Delaware,” to consider the significance of humor in contemporary art. Barber will discuss how contemporary black artists, such as Camille Billops, David Hammons, Barkley Hendricks, and Peter Williams, employ subversive humor to question the currency of cultural and racial stereotypes.
This event is part of the African American Intellectual Culture Series, and is cosponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Office of the Provost, and the Department of Visual and Performing Arts.

Talk and book signing

“Light in the Dark: A Talk on Writing and Humor”
7p.m.
Thursday, February 23
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Is it possible to fake your own death in the twenty-first century? With six figures of student loan debt, author Elizabeth Greenwood was tempted to find out. She set off on a foray into the world of death fraud, where for $30,000 a consultant can make you disappear, possibly forever. Greenwood will read from her book “Playing Dead: A Journey Through the World of Death Fraud” (2016), and introduce us to men and women desperate enough to lose their identities—and their families—to begin again. She will lead a discussion on the role of humor in illuminating and exploring our darkest impulses. A book signing will follow. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Writing Center.

Lecture and book signing

“BALLS: It Takes Some to Get Some”
7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 1
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
For Chris Edwards, a former advertising creative director, changing his gender from female to male took balls…and a damn good sense of humor. How did he find the courage to come out at a company board meeting of white, middle-aged executives; to endure 28 painful and extensive surgeries; or to show up at his 10-year high school reunion? Edwards will read from his funny and poignant memoir “BALLS: It Takes Some to Get Some” (2016), and share how humor helped him re-brand himself and gain acceptance from his family, friends, and colleagues at a time when the word “transgender” was almost non-existent.
A book signing will follow. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Women’s and Gender Studies Program.

Workshop

“The Truth is Funny: An Improvisation Workshop”
7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 15
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
“The truth is funny. Honest discovery, observation, and reaction is better than contrived invention.” The words of actor Del Close have inspired countless improvisational comics. In this workshop, Dan Balel (Theater) and Gino DiIorio (Theater) will lead us in theater games and improvisation exercises to develop trust, reveal truths, and generate laughs.
This event is cosponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Theatre Arts Program.

Film Screening and Discussion

“’THE LAST LAUGH’; A Film Screening and Discussion”
7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 21
Jefferson Academic Center, Room 320
“THE LAST LAUGH,” a feature documentary by Ferne Pearlstein, proceeds from the premise that the Holocaust would seem to be an absolutely off-limits topic for comedy. But is it? History shows that even the victims of the Nazi concentration camps used humor as a means of survival and resistance. Still, any hint of comedy in connection with this horror risks diminishing the suffering of millions. So where is the line? If we make the Holocaust off limits, what are the implications for other controversial subjects— 9/11, AIDS, racism—in a society that prizes freedom of speech? Valerie Sperling (Holocaust and Genocide Studies/Political Science) and Amy Richter (History) will facilitate a conversation after the film.
This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program, and Screen Studies.

Lecture

“Brother Jonathan Runs for President: American Humor, Vernacular Values, and the Rise of Trump”
7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 28
Higgins Lounge at Dana Commons, 2nd floor
Challenges to America’s most sacred myths fuel the traditions of vernacular humor, which asserts faith in ordinary Americans and mistrust of elites. Spoof presidential campaigns by ostensibly ordinary citizens—heirs of Brother Jonathan, folklore’s quintessential American—have mocked the ideological contradictions of presidential campaigns whose vernacular values nonetheless yield elite results.

Professor Judith Yaross Lee (Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University) will consider how nearly 200 years of spoof campaigns in cartoon, video, newspaper features, and other formats highlight values and visions always at stake in the presidential race, but especially in the candidacy of Donald Trump. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Department of History, and the Bland Fund of the Department of Political Science.

Shop early for Valentine’s Day! Sweet deals for your sweethearts🎵 …

… at Unique Finds Antiques and Vintage gift shop – 1329 Main St., Worcester.

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

Until 7 p.m.

Check out their furniture warehouse – a 4-minute drive from the shop!

(Our planet is gonna need a lotta love – every man, woman and child! – now that Donald Trump is the most powerful person on it!

Madness!!!

Bold-faced lies, “alternative” facts, destroying the EPA, shutting down the free flow of info to the people!

God save America, the new upside-down shit sandwich!)

– text/pics: R. Tirella

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From Congressman Jim McGovern …

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Worcester shows pink! … Jim joined the Million!!!!! Women March in D.C. this past weekend! Go, Jim, go!

McGovern Introduces Bill to Overturn Citizens United and Get Money Out of Politics

House, Senate Bills Push Constitutional Amendment to Overturn Citizens United

Days after the seven year anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in the Citizens United case, Congressman Jim McGovern (MA-02) and Representatives Ted Deutch (FL-22) and Jamie Raskin (MD-08) joined Senators Tom Udall (D-NM) and Michael Bennet (D-CO) in re-introducing the Democracy for All Amendment.

This constitutional amendment would help to reverse the concentration of political influence held by large corporations and the wealthy capable of spending millions of dollars in American elections. To help get big money out of politics and restore democratic power to the American people, this amendment would affirm the right of the people to pass state and federal laws regulating spending in elections.

Congressman McGovern has been a leading voice in Congress calling to get money out of politics and introduced a similar measure to overturn Citizens United in 2011.

“There’s too much money in our politics. It is a corrupting force. It undermines our democracy and drowns out the voices of the people,” Congressman McGovern said. “The Democracy for All Amendment empowers Congress and state legislatures with the ability to limit spending in political campaigns in their respective states. It will help return power to the people and take it out of the hands of special interests. Citizens United was a dreadful decision that has done great harm to our democracy. This is a way to begin to take back our country.

“The Supreme Court’s disastrous Citizens United decision reserved meaningful political participation for the rich and wealthy special interests,” said Congressman Deutch. “At every turn and on nearly every issue, from gun safety to climate change, unlimited political spending ensures that Congress is tuned in to the needs of special interests and tunes out the voices of the American people. It’s time to get money out of politics to guard our elections against a dangerous threat that erodes the faith of the American people in our democratic institutions.

“The 2016 election was supposed to be a call to ‘drain the swamp’ — because so many Americans are fed up with business as usual in Washington, where moneyed special interests drown out the voices of regular Americans,” said Senator Udall. “But instead of reform, President Trump has set out rewarding Wall Street insiders and billionaire donors with cabinet and other key positions in the new administration, and the ultra-wealthy and well-connected look to have more power than ever in determining the future of our democracy. Each year, because of Citizens United and subsequent decisions, the door has opened wider for rich special interests and corporations to pour unlimited sums of money into our elections and root themselves in our government.

“The only real way we can put our democracy back in the hands of all Americans, instead of a privileged, powerful few, is to amend the Constitution. Our Democracy for All Amendment restores the authority of the American people – through Congress and the states – to regulate campaign finance, so that our elections aren’t put up for sale to the highest bidder. Millions of people across the country and over a dozen state legislatures, including New Mexico’s, have voiced support for a constitutional amendment, and we must keep pressing forward to ensure a government that is of, by, and for the people.

“Coloradans want commonsense reforms to fix our broken campaign finance system and bring some semblance of sanity to our politics. This constitutional amendment would do that by establishing the authority of Congress and the states to pass reasonable campaign finance rules,” Senator Michael Bennet said. “In order to get Washington working and restore faith in our democracy, we must end the flood of unlimited secret money that’s drowning out the voices of Colorado families.

“Seven years ago, five justices overturned two centuries of jurisprudence to determine that private business corporations enjoy the political free speech rights of the people,” said Congressman Raskin. “Today, after hundreds of millions of dollars in dark money have been spent by CEOs in the name of their unwitting shareholders and billionaires act as our new political bosses and cabinet secretaries, we can see what plutocracy looks like. I’m proud to support the Democracy for All Amendment to rebuild the wall of separation between massive corporate and private wealth and public elections.

“Americans may be divided about many things, but they are united in their belief that the Supreme Court’s Citizens United v. FEC decision was a disaster,” said Robert Weissman, President of Public Citizen. “They know that the political system is rigged, and that Citizens United-enabled spending by corporations and the super-rich is a big part of the problem. It is past time to overturn this decision and get big money out of politics. Public Citizen thanks Rep. Ted Deutch and other sponsors of the Democracy for All amendment for their leadership in advancing this vital initiative.

“Common Cause commends Congressman Deutch, Senator Udall, and many other members of Congress for their leadership in championing the Democracy for All Amendment to help reduce the influence of big money in politics,” said Aaron Scherb, Director of Legislative Affairs at Common Cause. “The Democracy for All Amendment would help ensure that the voices of all Americans can be heard in our democracy even if they can’t hire a lobbyist, make a large campaign contribution, or start a super PAC.

“After the election, it’s clearer than ever that we need money in politics reform,” said Marge Baker, Executive Vice President of People For the American Way. “Super PAC spending during the 2016 cycle was nearly double what it was in the last presidential election. The voices of everyday Americans can’t be heard when wealthy special interests can tilt our elections to fit their interests. We applaud Senator Udall, Representative Deutch, Representative McGovern, Representative Raskin, and the other congressional champions who continue to push for needed reforms like the Democracy For All Amendment.

“We applaud Members of Congress for re-introducing the Democracy For All Amendment to ensure that big money interests will no longer be able to dominate our elections and our government, drowning out the voices of ordinary citizens,” said John Bonifaz, President of Free Speech For People. “To advance the promise of political equality for all and to reclaim our democracy, Congress must pass this constitutional amendment and send it to the states for ratification.

“Americans across the political spectrum know we must have the 28th Amendment so that people, not money and global corporations, govern America,” said Jeff Clements, President of American Promise. “At American Promise, we applaud this progress in Congress and urge cross-partisan support for this effort.”

Surviving in Trumpland … Congressman Jim McGovern: Trump Financial Transparency Vital to National Security

From the LATE SHOW w/ Stephen Colbert:

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McGovern Backs Bill Requiring Presidential Candidates to Release Tax Returns

Congressman Jim McGovern (D-MA), the second-highest ranking Democrat on the House Rules Committee, joined today House Democrats in calling for passage of legislation to require presidential candidates to disclose three years of their tax returns.

This year, President-elect Donald Trump became the first presidential nominee in more than 30 years to not release his tax returns.

Speaking on S. 2943, the FY 2017 National Defense Authorization Act Conference Report, Congressman McGovern emphasized the need for the American people to know where a presidential candidate has financial dealings because of the direct impact that could have on national security.

McGovern pointed to the example of President-elect Donald Trump and his glowing praise of Russian President Vladimir Putin, raising questions about Trump’s potential financial dealings in Russia and whether he would stand up to Putin to protect U.S. interests and defend human rights.

“Tax returns provide the public with vital information about our presidential candidates. Have they paid taxes at all? Do they keep money offshore? Or have they taken advantage of tax loopholes? This is important information that voters have a right to know.

“The American people should expect candidates running for president to be open and transparent about their tax returns. And this legislation would ensure that transparency. It is hard for me to believe that giving people the right to know about presidential candidates’ financial dealings is controversial. I hope that this isn’t.

“I think where a presidential candidate and soon-to-be-President has financial dealings is directly related to our national defense. Does he have investments in Russia? Does he have investments in countries that have been hostile to human rights or to U.S. interests in various parts of the world? That is very relevant.”

McGovern also highlighted the Global Magnitsky Act which aims to builds on the Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act, legislation that McGovern authored. That legislation focused on Russia and was approved by Congress and signed into law in 2012. The law targets individual Russian officials accountable for the death of Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky, as well as other Russian officials engaged in corruption, human rights abuses or who seek to undermine the rule of law. It denies them visas to the United States, and freezes their assets in the United States. The Global Magnitsky Act would extend the use of those same targeted sanctions to all countries, not just Russia, and ensure that visiting the United States and having access to our financial system, including U.S. dollars, are privileges not granted to those who violate human rights and the rule of law.

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Full Text of Congressman McGovern’s Speech:

“Tax returns provide the public with vital information about our presidential candidates. Have they paid taxes at all? Do they keep money offshore? Or have they taken advantage of tax loopholes? This is important information that voters have a right to know.

“The American people should expect candidates running for president to be open and transparent about their tax returns. And this legislation would ensure that transparency. It is hard for me to believe that giving people the right to know about presidential candidates’ financial dealings is controversial. I hope that this isn’t.

“I think where a presidential candidate and soon-to-be-President has financial dealings is directly related to our national defense. Does he have investments in Russia? Does he have investments in countries that have been hostile to human rights or to U.S. interests in various parts of the world? That is very relevant.

“I don’t know where the head of our next president is going to be when it comes to standing up to abuses by people like Vladimir Putin against opposition leaders and journalists and anybody he disagrees with.

“This bill is named after a guy named Sergei Magnitsky, who, by the way, was an accountant in Russia who uncovered the largest corruption scandal in Russia’s history. And what was his reward for doing that? Putin had him put in jail. He was tortured. And he was beaten to death. That’s what happens in places that are run by strong men like Vladimir Putin.

“So yes, I’d like to know whether or not our next president has investments in Russia. I think that would be very relevant to know. And quite frankly, the reason this Magnitsky legislation is so important is it gives us a tool to pressure the next administration on the issue of human rights. And it is a signal to Putin and other dictators and strong men around the world that Congress is not going to be silent in the face of human rights abuses.

“Let the American people know what the financial dealings of their presidential candidates and soon-to-be-presidents are.”