Tag Archives: lions

Some pics from our FB circus page gal, Deb Young …

Deb has been posting such important information on wild animals in circuses and animals in general on our FB circus page, on this website. … More and more people are “liking” the page (click on text by baby elephant being “trained” to get to it). Hopefully, we’re all learning and changing the way we engage with our planet’s beautiful and always mysterious fauna.

Here’s Deb and her adorable chihuahua, Juno! I really like the second photo: You can see the love Juno has for Deb … her eyes are closed in contentment … it looks as if she’s smiling!    – R.T.

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5 Circuses that need to follow Ringling and get rid of elephant acts

From PETA.ORG . PLEASE BOYCOTT THESE CIRCUSES UNTIL THEY STOP USING WILD ANIMALS!

A few of them come to Worcester! OUR CITY MUST SHOUT: STOP THE CRUELTY TO ELEPHANTS!!!

And … a reminder!

Local gal Deb Young has created an informative and lively FB page on the wild animals forced to perform in traveling shows. Want to learn ALL ABOUT elephants, tigers, lions, bears, monkeys and the work being done in Massachusetts AND AROUND THE WORLD to put an end to their suffering in circuses, roadside zoos, traveling shows?  Then CLICK ON CIRCUS FB PAGE on THIS WEBSITE! (near the photo of the poor baby elephant!)

We’ve gained momentum with Ringling’s decision!!! Let’s PUSH ON!!!!!             – R. Tirella

 

5 Circuses That Need to Follow Ringling and Get Rid of Elephant Acts Now

Written by PETA March 13, 2015

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus has conceded: The public no longer supports dragging elephants around the country and forcing them to perform tricks under the constant threat of being hit with a bullhook, so it’s phasing out its elephant acts. These other circuses should accept that the days of elephant exploitation are long over and allow the elephants used in their shows to be retired and relocated to sanctuaries:

1.) UniverSoul Circus

Atlanta law-enforcement officials recently charged both a UniverSoul Circus representative and Larry Carden, the elephant exhibitor performing with the circus, with cruelty to animals after a whistleblower reported to PETA that a handler with the circus forced an apparently fearful elephant to leave the stage by inserting a bullhook—a sharp metal weapon that resembles a fireplace poker—into the animal’s sensitive mouth.

A UniverSoul Circus trainer brandishes a bullhook.

2.) Carson & Barnes

The notorious Carson & Barnes Circus has a long history of abusing elephants. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently cited the circus for failing to provide an elephant named Nina with adequate veterinary care. Nina—whom a Carson & Barnes worker was caught beating on video while touring with another circus in 2011—has lost 500 pounds in the last several months alone.

Nina, an Elephant with the Carson and Barnes Circus.

Nina, an Elephant with the Carson and Barnes Circus.

3.) Kelly Miller Circus

Kelly Miller Circus is using a lonely, sad elephant named Anna Louise. Elephants are highly social animals who suffer when denied the company of other elephants.

Elephants with the Kelly Miller circus and a trainer with a bullhook.

4.) Shrine Circuses

Shrine Circuses rent their elephant acts from a variety of exhibitors— all of which have deplorable records of animal care.

Shrine Circus elephant rides.

5.) Cole Brothers Circus

The Cole Bros. Circus paid a civil penalty of $15,000 to settle more than ten Animal Welfare Act violations. In 2011, Cole Bros. and its president pleaded guilty to violating the Endangered Species Act by illegally selling two Asian elephants. The circus was ordered to pay more than $150,000 in fines.

Tina and Jewel Cole Brothers Circus

What You Can Do

Urge Circus World, which has historically hired the notorious exhibitor Carson & Barnes Circus, to end cruel elephant exhibits. Also, only buy tickets to cruelty-free circuses that don’t force animals to perform silly tricks.

No kiddin’!!

Lately, I’ve been regretting not having kids. Here is one of my spare bedrooms – unconsciously kid friendly when I put it together.  …  cuz ya never know – foster care is always an option. I couldn’t afford $$ a nice head-board for the bed, so I made one with my three  1960s-flower “paintings” smooshed together. Then I decorated the wall with my First Communion dress (gently washed) and the teen acoustic guitar my late, great mom bought for me years ago. Then there’s the pony and MADELINE book …

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I would never take my kid to circuses with wild animals. Even though Ringling is pulling the wool over some local reporters’ eyes –   parading their acrobat woman and talking elephant sanctuaries   – this is what I am finding all over Worcester: these flyers (see below) TOUTING exactly what most people come to Ringling for – the wild animals.

Look at how Ringling has them degraded in the flyer I picked up  today!

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Dunce caps for the local reporters who stupidly fell into Ringling’s very savvy public relations/publicity campaign!

– Rosalie Tirella

Worcester Mayor Joe Petty …

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… told me a few hours ago HE WON’T BE DOING ANY PR with Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus at/in front of Worcester  City Hall or on our Worcester Common next week …

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“Busy all week.” Mayor Petty told me. (I took this pic of him, with his son, last summer!) He didn’t sound too excited about the wild animals in the circus … “Busy all week,” he said again.

Good enough for this gal!

Petty’ll pretty much be following the lead of former Worcester Mayor Joe O’Brien, whose office just stepped away from the whole Ringling elephant/wild animal horror show.

Petty also agreed with me: Fewer and fewer kids – people in their late 20s /early 30s – are into circuses that have wild animals. They don’t want to go – they skip the whole scene.

More and more young people just get the total up-side-down-ness of  forcing wild animals into a kind of servitude for humans. Cruel, cruel, cruel … THEY GET IT! I predict circuses with wild animals will soon go the way of the old circus “freak show,” a cruel term used not so long ago to describe hustlers parading people like “The Elephant Man” or little people, etc in front of large crowds, totally oblivious to their loneliness, sadness, emotional deprivation, often physical pain …

Most of Europe’s done it. Lots of other countries, too. Why is the U.S. lagging behind? We try to be first when it comes to human rights. Why not animal rights? The two are inextricably bound!

– R. Tirella

p.s. Petty also said, quite nicely, that YES, he listens to/hears me! Very nice telephone conversation. I felt like I was talking with a smart, sensitive guy! Made me feel good about my city!

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus beats, punches and whips its animals! Former employee speaks out!

Archele Hundley, a former Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus employee, recently teamed up with PETA to make a moving plea to potential circusgoers.

Hundley, who witnessed elephant beatings during her time with Ringling, urges people to stay away from the circus.

“I saw handlers deliver a beating … for 30 minutes. She was covered with bloody wounds. I’ll never forget her agonizing screams,” says Hundley. “Please, never take your children to a Ringling Bros. circus.”

Hundley worked on Ringling’s animal crew for two months.

During that time, she witnessed incidents of abuse, including the following:

In 2006 an elephant in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was beaten with bullhooks so severely that she bled profusely and cried out in pain. A trainer viciously whipped a camel and punched a miniature horse in the face.

Trainers jabbed horses with pitchforks and gave them extremely painful “lip twists” to force the animals to obey commands.

An elephant with painful arthritis was kept on the road.

“The abuse was not just once in a while—it occurred every day,” says Hundley.

She continues: “The elephants, horses, and camels were hit, punched, beaten, and whipped by everyone from the head of animal care down to inexperienced animal handlers hired out of homeless shelters.”

Archele says that she repeatedly complained to circus management about the abuse but to no avail, prompting her to quit in disgust.

Archele teamed up with PETA because she wanted others to learn about the cruelty involved when animals are forced to perform in circuses.

You can help spread the message by boycotting the circus and telling everyone you know about circus cruelty.

The circus is coming to Worcester! Be prepared!!! 12 Things Ringling Doesn’t Want You to Know

PLEASE! Let Worcester’s city manager and city councilors know that you are AGAINST Ringling coming to Worcester! That wild animals do not belong on train box cars, are not supposed to be wearing head-dresses or saddles, should not – it’s morally reprehensible! – be forced to be anything but themselves. Wild animals!

Wild (exotic) animals, such as chimps, can NEVER be domesticated. Cute little chimps mature into adult chimpanzees  that can (and have) done real damage to the addle-brained humans who, stupidly, think they are our “pals.”  Wild animals are not domesticated dogs or cats or goats or cows or chickens! THEY have not been domesticated – genetically speaking! You can not BEAT, TRAIN a wild animal’s genetic NATURE out of it! Humans never have! We never will! For ex: Cute, captive polar bear cubs will attack and do serious damage to the very same people who have bottle nursed them and snuggled them and smooched them up when they are just a few months older! Why can’t we “get” this? Cuz the animals are so GORGEOUS and AWE-INSPIRING and we are so selfish.

PLEASE click on the CLICK HERE at bottom of this list to LEARN MUCH MORE!  OR visit the InCity Times cirucs Facebook page on this website (just click b y the elephant photo to the right on this screen)                      – Rosalie  Tirella

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12 Things Ringling Doesn’t Want You to Know

If there’s one thing Ringling Bros. circus has proved over the years, it’s that it’s the cruelest show on Earth. Here are 12 things that Ringling Bros. doesn’t want you to know:

1. The circus tears babies away from their mothers.

At around 21 months old, baby elephants are dragged away from their mothers, who have to be restrained. In the wild, males stay with their mothers until they’re teenagers and female elephants stay with their mothers their entire lives.

2. “Breaking” elephants really means “breaking their spirits.”

Baby elephants are forced to stand on a concrete floor for about 23 hours a day for up to six months, unable to lie down or even turn around.

3. Trainers use bullhooks, ropes, and electric prods.

Baby elephants learn to fear bullhooks from a very young age.

4. Training goes unmonitored by any agency of any kind.

The elephants cry out, but there is no one there to help them.

5. Elephants spend most of their lives in chains.

When they aren’t performing, elephants are confined.

6. Elephants travel in boxcars like these for up to 100 hours straight.

The doors are barely bigger than they are.

7. Elephants are beaten for the slightest disobedience.

8. The wounds on this elephant are plainly visible.

Trainers usually cover them up with “Wonder Dust” so that inspectors can’t see them.

9. Ringling paid a $270,000 fine for violations of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA).

10. Ringling’s abuse lasts a lifetime.

11. Protests are organized almost everywhere that Ringling goes.

12. Even kids know about Ringling’s abuse.

The sheen around “the cruelest show on Earth” is nearly gone, as more and more people speak out against Ringling’s barbaric practices every day!

Read more – click here!

Circuses: three rings of abuse!

From PETA.ORG

We have not given up the fight! Please educate yourself! Please keep your kids away from shows that “showcase” wild animals. Please check out our FACEBOOK PAGE on circuses (to the right – just click on the words!) to learn, connect and ACT!  No more animal cruelty!  – R. Tirella

Although some children dream of running away to join the circus, it is a safe bet that most animals forced to perform in circuses dream of running away from the circus. Colorful pageantry disguises the fact that animals used in circuses are captives who are forced—under threat of punishment—to perform confusing, uncomfortable, repetitious, and often painful acts. Circuses would quickly lose their appeal if more people knew about the cruel methods used to train the animals as well as the cramped confinement, unacceptable travel conditions, and poor treatment that they endure—not to mention what happens to them when they “retire.”

A Life Far Removed From Home
Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus boasts that it “travels 30,000 miles for 11 months, and visits more than 140 cities in North America!”(1) Because circuses are constantly traveling from city to city, animals’ access to basic necessities such as food, water, and veterinary care is often inadequate. The animals, most of whom are quite large and naturally active, are forced to spend most of their lives in the cramped, barren cages and trailers used to transport them, where they have only enough room to stand and turn around. Most animals are allowed out of their cages only during the short periods when they must perform. Elephants are kept in leg shackles that prevent them from taking more than one step in any direction. The minimum requirements of the federal Animal Welfare Act (AWA) are routinely ignored.

The lives of baboons, chimpanzees, and other primates used in circuses are a far cry from those of their wild relatives, who live in large, close-knit communities and travel together for miles each day across forests, savannahs, and hills. Primates are highly social, intelligent, and caring animals who suffer when deprived of companionship. Like all animals used in entertainment, primates do not perform unless they are forced to—often by inflicting beatings and imposing solitary confinement. After watching video footage of baboons in a traveling circus called “Baboon Lagoon,” Dr. Robert Sapolsky, a research associate with the Institute of Primate Research in Kenya, said, “[T]raining most baboons to do tricks of the sort displayed is not trivial … it is highly likely that it required considerable amounts of punishment and intimidation.”(2)

During the off-season, animals used in circuses may be housed in traveling crates or barn stalls— some are even kept in trucks. Such interminable confinement has harmful physical and psychological effects on animals. These effects are often indicated by unnatural forms of behavior such as repeated head-bobbing, swaying, and pacing.(3)

The tricks that animals are forced to perform—such as when bears balance on balls, apes ride motorcycles, and elephants stand on two legs—are physically uncomfortable and behaviorally unnatural. The whips, tight collars, muzzles, electric prods, bullhooks, and other tools used during circus acts are reminders that the animals are being forced to perform. These “performances” teach audiences nothing about how animals behave under normal circumstances.

Beaten Into Submission
Physical punishment has always been the standard training method for animals in circuses. Animals are beaten, shocked, and whipped to make them perform—over and over again—tricks that make no sense to them. The AWA allows the use of bullhooks, whips, electrical shock prods, or other devices by circus trainers. Trainers drug some animals to make them “manageable” and surgically remove the teeth and claws of others.

Video footage shot during a PETA undercover investigation of Carson & Barnes Circus showed Carson & Barnes’ animal-care director, Tim Frisco, as he viciously attacked, yelled and cursed at, and shocked endangered Asian elephants. Frisco instructed other elephant trainers to beat the elephants with a bullhook as hard as they could and to sink the sharp metal bullhook into the animals’ flesh and twist it until they screamed in pain. The videotape also showed a handler who used a blowtorch to remove elephants’ hair as well as chained elephants and caged bears who exhibited stereotypic behaviors caused by mental distress.

Cole Bros. Circus, formerly known as “Clyde Beatty–Cole Bros. Circus,” has been cited repeatedly by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for animal welfare violations. According to congressional testimony given by former Beatty-Cole elephant keeper Tom Rider, “[I]n White Plains, N.Y., when Pete did not perform her act properly, she was taken to the tent and laid down, and five trainers beat her with bullhooks.” Rider also told officials that “[a]fter my three years working with elephants in the circus, I can tell you that they live in confinement and they are beaten all the time when they don’t perform properly.”(4)

Former Ringling Bros. employees have reported that elephants are routinely abused and violently beaten with bullhooks. Archele Hundley, who was an animal trainer with Ringling Bros., says that she worked with the company for three months and quit after she allegedly saw a handler ram a bullhook into an elephant’s ear for refusing to lie down. Ringling Bros. “believes that if they can keep these animals afraid, they can keep them submissive,” Hundley said. “This is how they train their employees to handle these animals.”(5)

In 2009, PETA recorded Ringling Bros. employees for many months and in numerous U.S. states. Eight employees, including the head elephant trainer and the animal superintendent, were videotaped backstage repeatedly hitting elephants in the head, trunk, ears, and other sensitive body parts with bullhooks and other cruel training devices just before the animals would enter the arena for performances. A tiger trainer was videotaped beating tigers during dress rehearsals. Video footage from the investigation can be viewed at RinglingBeatsAnimals.com.

In lieu of a USDA hearing, Feld Entertainment, Inc. (the parent company of Ringling Bros.), agreed to pay an unprecedented $270,000 fine for violations of the AWA that allegedly occurred between June 2007 and August 2011.(6)

Animals Rebel
These intelligent captive animals sometimes snap under the pressure of constant abuse. Others make their feelings abundantly clear when they get a chance. Flora, an elephant who had been forced to perform in a circus and was later moved to the Miami Zoo, attacked and severely injured a zookeeper in front of visitors.(7) As Florida police officer Blayne Doyle—who shot 47 rounds into Janet, an elephant who ran amok with three children on her back at the Great American Circus in Palm Bay—noted, “I think these elephants are trying to tell us that zoos and circuses are not what God created them for … but we have not been listening.”(8)

What You Can Do
As more people become aware of the cruelty involved in forcing animals to perform, circuses that use animals are finding fewer places to set up their big tops. The use of animals in entertainment has already been restricted or banned in cities across the U.S. and in countries worldwide. For instance, Bolivia, Greece, Israel, Peru, and Sweden have banned the use of all animals in circuses, and Britain has prohibited the use of wild animals in traveling circuses.(9,10)

Take your family to see only animal-free circuses, such as Cirque du Soleil. PETA can provide you with literature to pass out to patrons if a circus that uses animals comes to your town. Find out about state and local animal protection laws, and report any suspected violations to authorities. Contact PETA for information on ways to get an animal-display ban passed in your area.

References
1) Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, “Circus Figures: The Numbers Behind ‘The Greatest Show on Earth,’” Feld Entertainment, Inc., 2007.
2) Robert Sapolsky, letter to PETA, June 2004.
3) Randi Hutter Epstein, “Circus Life Drives Animals Insane, Two British Rights Groups Contend,” The Associated Press, 24 Aug. 1993.
4) Tom Rider, testimony, legislative hearing on H.R. 2929, 13 June 2000.
5) Ira Kantor, “Bill Would Outlaw Hooks Used on Elephants,” The Milford Daily News 17 Oct. 2007.
6) Leigh Remizowski, “USDA Fines Ringling Bros. Circus Over Treatment of Animals,” CNN.com, 29 Nov. 2011.
7) NBC 6 News Team, “Elephant Who Attacked Handler Was Circus Star,” NBC6.net, 17 Dec. 2002.
8) Louis Sahagun, “Elephants Pose Giant Dangers,” Los Angeles Times 11 Oct. 1994.
9) Sydney Azari, “Greece Bans Animal Circuses,” Bikya Masr 10 Feb. 2012.
10) Fred Attewill, “Travelling Circuses Banned From Using Wild Animals in Shows,” Metro 1 Mar. 2012.

Read more: http://www.peta.org/issues/animals-in-entertainment/animals-used-entertainment-factsheets/circuses-three-rings-abuse/#ixzz2wcJX6OiJ

 

End of the road for animal acts

By Jennifer O’Connor

The trend is undeniable: The days of hauling animals around and hurting them in the name of entertainment are quickly coming to an end. Winnipeg is the latest municipality to slam the door shut on circuses using exotic animals. Mayor Sam Katz and the Winnipeg City Council made it clear that they will no longer tolerate circus cruelty.

All around the world, cities and entire countries are banning exotic-animal circus acts. Austria, Bolivia, Colombia, Greece, Paraguay and Peru have done so already, and others, including Britain and Scotland, are on the verge of doing so. Besides outright bans, many cities are saying no to the tools that circuses use to inflict pain, such as the bullhook—a heavy baton with a sharp metal hook on the end that can rip and tear elephants’ skin—and electric prods. Since circuses control animals with these cruel devices—or more accurately, attempt to control them, since so many have run amok—such prohibitions effectively keep the animals out.

Only a decade or so ago, the fabulous Cirque du Soleil was one of the few alternative circuses around. But the demand for cruelty-free entertainment has skyrocketed, and now there are more than a dozen vibrant, innovative productions touring North America that don’t exploit animals. Even consummate huckster P.T. Barnum couldn’t convince today’s informed public that beating animals and keeping them in cages and chains from birth to death is acceptable.

The empirical evidence of what life is like for animals in circuses is undeniable and readily available to the public. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, for example, paid a record $270,000 to settle multiple violations of the federal Animal Welfare Act. At least 30 elephants have died while in Ringling’s hands since 1992.

Former employees of Ringling have come forward to report egregious abuses, including forcibly removing baby elephants from their frantic mothers, tying them down by all four legs, and slamming them to the ground, surrounded by “trainers” wielding bullhooks and electric hotshots.

An undercover investigator videotaped a Carson & Barnes elephant trainer who was viciously attacking elephants with a bullhook and shocking them with electric prods. The elephants screamed in agony while recoiling from the assaults. The trainer can be heard instructing his students to sink the weapons into the elephants’ flesh and twist them until the elephants scream in pain.

Despite being ordered to pay a $7,500 penalty to settle nearly three dozen charges of violations of the federal Animal Welfare Act, the Liebel Family Circus continues to drag around an elephant named Nosey, even though she is suffering from a chronic skin condition. The Piccadilly Circus was given an official warning by federal authorities about its animal-handling practices. The Kelly Miller Circus has been cited for denying adequate veterinary care to an elephant with a painful, oozing puncture wound on her ear, among other abuses.

The facts are simple and stark: Animals in circuses suffer tremendously. Every parent or grandparent who buys a ticket is contributing directly to the animals’ misery. Every child who exits a show believing that hurting animals is “fun” leaves a bit of his or her heart behind. Our elected officials should enact additional laws that put a stop to an outmoded form of “entertainment” that has no place in a civilized society.

It’s great …

… when this happens: You deliver your papers – two seconds later, someone has picked up a copy and is reading it! Biggest compliment you can pay this gal!

Interesting … this hardworking young man said he and his friends aren’t into circuses that use exotic animals. He frowned when he talked about them. And his buddy/co-worker (not in pic) agreed, saying the touring wild animal thing would be history within 10 years … .

It’s funny, Ringling is in town and they are downplaying the horrific way they make their dough. As if they know the end is near … . Their ads are very Cirque de Soleil: a print of a lady riding a dragon. Their theme is dragons. Bull shit. It’s elephants and tigers and … enslaving them and breaking their spirit and feeding them crap and making them experience and do everything that is totally unnatural to them. THE ANIMALS ARE NOT DOMESTICATED, LIKE HORSES OR DOGS. THEY ARE WILD – LIKE WOLVES OR COYOTES. THEY ARE BEING FORCED TO BE WITH HUMANS AND PERFORM FOR THEM. It is wrong to enslave any wild thing … .

This young guy is the new Worcester and America. The kids don’t want to enslave wild animals! The Kids Are All Right!

– R. Tirella

Worcester City Council meets tomorrow (Tues.) evening, 7 p.m., City Hall, Main Street … and a song

It’s a good time to ask our city council members to think of the elephants and tigers and lions who come to town with the circus … think of their suffering and how unnatural it is for these magnificent animals to  “perform” – for anybody.

Ask the people we vote into office to represent US to KEEP Worcester free of shows that drag wild animals into our city …

I attended last week’s city council meeting to give out elephant and wild-animal information packets to every council member. I also attended the council subcommittee meeting to make our case. I found it a wee bit uncomfortable – so different from the paper! – BUT I DID IT! You can, too! Call the Mayor’s office to get on the city council agenda. Or visit his office in City Hall – 3rd floor. OR stop by tomorrow night’s city council meeting before 7 p.m. and ask to speak to this city issue. The circus will be in town in several days … we need to take our stand. NOW!

Click here for city council agenda! – R. Tirella

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Here’s a song from a great – and my fave – animal rights activist – Chrissie Hynde.