Tag Archives: Preservation

Worcester City Council: Please! Vote next Tuesday to approve the Our Lady of Mount Carmel block as a local Historic District!

By Mauro DePasquale, President, Mount Carmel Preservation Society

Parishioners and Members of the Mount Carmel Preservation Society (MPS) support a vote to approve the Our Lady of Mount Carmel block as a local Historic District.

This is supported by the fund raising efforts of MPS, as well as by more than 12,000 petitioners who are asking the Bishop and Pastor to fix the Church and Save the Parish on Mulberry Street.

Preservation is about celebrating something that is precious, meaningful and good for ALL people, as it raises the aesthetic of our surroundings.

The act of preservation benefits everyone and is a form of unification.

Mount Carmel Preservation Society is dedicated to fixing one of the top seven most endangered historical resources in all of Massachusetts (Our Lady Of Mount Carmel Church).

The designation of a historical district will:

improve the status of the Mount Carmel neighborhood;

protect the area for community benefit;

improve the cultural vitality of our city;

and mark a significant and unique space for all to gather, to celebrate and share something special, of historical significance, with our Italian American community and all immigrant groups.

It will also provide opportunities for the Parishioners of Our Lady Of Mount Carmel to reinforce their sustainability efforts for the future.

This designation is about unification as it centers our collective heritage along with a unique historical building/resource and facing it into the future of Worcester’s identity.

This is the glue that cements true preservation, as we share and celebrate something meaningful with common purpose.

To counter this effort is an affront to the human spirit and those things we the collective community hold of value.

Approving the local historic district designation for the Our Lady of Mount Carmel block sends a message that Worcester cares and values its immigrant communities, old and new.

http://www.preserveourladyofmountcarmel.org

Fix our Church and Save our Parish on Mulberry St.

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Worcester City Council contact info

Call our city councilors and ask them to VOTE YES! Thank you!

Mayor Joe Petty
508-799-1153 work
508-799-8789 home

Morris Bergman
508-799-1049 work
508-754-8141 home

Khrystian King
508-799-1049 work

Konstantina Lukes
508-799-1049 work
508-798-1815 home

Kate Toomey
508-799-1049 work
508-798-1815

Anthony Economou
508-854-3014 home

Candy Mero-Carlson
508-799-1049 work

Michael Gaffney
508-799-1049 work

George Russell
508-795-0333 home

Sarai Rivera
508-799-1049 work
508-755-3006 home

Gary Rosen
508-7991049 work
508-755-3006 home

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Save Our Lady of Mount Carmel church! Attend next week’s City Council meeting!

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Pray very hard, people! AND GET POLITICAL! pic:R.T.

By Mauro DePasquale, Mount Carmel Preservation Society

Next Tuesday, at Worcester City Hall, will be our last opportunity to preserve our beloved Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church as a local historic district in Worcester.

This designation is an important step to ensuring protection against the wrecking ball.

The life of our church and parish should not come down to the whim of a few who want to give up on our more than 100-year-old historic Church and still vibrant and great parish.

Read what follows and understand that we must stand tall together to counter the determination of the Diocesan leadership to demolish our beautiful historic church and the heart of Italian American culture in Worcester, as well as the heart of Worcester’s Italian American community.

We must also speak up and set the story straight and stop their continual loop of misinformation.

There can be many financial and economic benefits for Our Lady of Mount Carmel to be declared a historic district or building. We are very close to succeeding. Work to make the church safe is near completed. Once we collect all pledges, we will have met our fundraising goal.

We have more than 12,000 petioners on our side; we have a sustainability plan. The City record and the media have recorded the City’s Commissioner Kelly stating that Mount Carmel doesn’t have to be knocked down.

The record also makes clear the cost needed to “make it safe” to be occupied is $120,000. We have a different interpretation of the response from our Vatican appeal. It addresses a procedural process, and the Vatican’s response did not invole the Holy See’s actual review of all the information accumulated in City of Worcester records and from the Mount Carmel Preservation Society’s efforts.

Our Lady of Loreto is in much larger debt to the Diocese than Our Lady of Mount Carmel. We understand Loreto is in over $600,000 in debt.

What about all the money our parish has raised over the years? Why are these men so willing to give up on that historic investment?

The City has done due diligence on this matter. It’s had the historical commission hearings, city council sub-committee hearings, and it has come before the general Worcester City Council.

Please call Worcester City Council members and ask them to do the right thing and to vote to preserve our Lady of Mount Carmel to support our Mount Carmel Preservation effort to fix our church and to save our parish on Mulberry Street.

Please be present at that City Council meeting on December 13, 2016, – City Council Chambers, 3rd floor, City Hall.

If rides are needed to City Hall, let us know. You can email me at maurodep1@gmail.com

Thank you, and God Bless you and Our Lady of Mount Carmel!

Edith in A.I…Worcester, should we preserve, restore or replace?

By Edith Morgan

We Worcesterites are in the midst of making decisions about many of the distinctive structures that dot our city, and that give testimony to some part of our history. In the cse of some, the decision has already been made, and they have either been razed and replaced (for example, The Odd Fellows Home on Randolph Road), or “repurposed” (like the Higgins Armory building, whose collection  is now part of the Worcester Art Museum’s collections).

Still in limbo are Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, and under threat of being razed is Notre Dame des Canadiens. And countless old school buildings are now condominiums, scattered in various parts of the city.

Resurrected beautifully, a number of buildings now serve their original purposes: Union Station, so long left to disintegrate, now stands proudly beside the I 290 highway, host once again to trains and now also busses going to many places far and near. The Hanover Theatre too is a joy to attend, as is the jewel of Worcester restorations, Mechanics Hall, also saved from disintegration.  And this past week, Memorial Grove in Green Hill Park, while not a building, was replanted in time for Memorial Day 2016.
 
While Worcester is not yet really a great tourist destination, we are taking steps to put ourselves on the map. What other destination cities have that we still do not have is a pedestrian-friendly environment. We are still plagued by narrow streets, too much traffic, narrow and uneven sidewalks, and lack of consistent street signs that enable newcomers to our city to get around.

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ICT editor Rosalie took these photos today. Lower Endicott Street. Illegal garbage-dumping makes Worcester univiting – and scary. It’s a big problem in District 4.

My husband and I just returned from a long trip around the U.S., and we have both in the past travelled widely around various parts of the world. So we have had a chance to look at what makes other places attractive to people. Each place hs its own attractions: sometimes it is geography (unusual scenery, water, hills and mountains, perfect climate, etc.); sometimes it is newness and cleanliness, and a sensible layout of streets and walks; other times it is trails through nature, or through historical sites – even cemeteries and monuments commemorating important events. Whatever the attraction, there is sufficient public support to publicize these “wonders” and to welcome visitors.
 
One feature that ALL these cited have is that they are very well maintained: they are not trashed by either inhabitants or visitors, and there is always a staff continuously cleaning, pruning, replanting and repainting so that all always looks attractive, safe and really cared for. There is a commitment to  daily maintenance because there is an understanding that no matter how beautiful your structures are, and how great your parks and buildings are, no one will feel  safe  if sites seem neglected and abandoned.

So, Worcester, let’s decide what we want to show off and really commit to paying to keep it all looking and feeling inviting to all!