Tag Archives: suffering

Nov. 8 please vote for humane living conditions for farm animals! Vote YES on Question 3

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Rosalie – 10/12/2016 …Over the years she’s run hundreds of articles in InCity Times on animal cruelty. Massachusetts farm animals need your support this election! Educate yourselves! Learn more below (we’ve made some sentences bold):

VOTE YES ON QUESTION 3

Please visit citizensforfarmanimals.com

Thank you,

“Rose”

Factory farms abuse animals

By Craig Shapiro

Imagine spending your life confined to a crate that is so small you can’t turn around. Imagine being mutilated without getting a painkiller or being forced to live in your own waste.

Billions of farmed animals endure these and other abuses every day — and when their bodies give out, they’re slaughtered for their flesh.

Mother pigs spend most of their lives in “gestation” crates about 7 feet long and 2 feet wide. After giving birth, they’re moved to farrowing crates that are only wide enough for them to lie down and nurse. Some piglets are just 10 days old when they’re taken from their mothers, who, in a cruel cycle, are impregnated again.

Piglets are held in crowded, filthy stalls until they’re separated to be raised for breeding or meat. The stress of confinement often leads to cannibalism and tail-biting, so their teeth are broken off with pliers and their tails are chopped off. Millions are also castrated — without being given painkillers.

Cows produce milk for the same reason humans do — to nourish their young — but calves on dairy farms are taken from their mothers when they’re just a day old. They’re fed milk replacers, including cattle blood, so their mothers’ milk can be sold to humans.

Female cows are artificially inseminated just after their first birthdays; once they give birth, they lactate for 10 months and are inseminated again. Some spend their lives standing on concrete floors while others are crowded onto massive feedlots and forced to live amid their own feces.

The stress of these conditions leads to disease, lameness and reproductive problems that make the cows worthless to the dairy industry, and after four or five years, they’re trucked to slaughter. A cow’s natural lifespan is about 20 years.

Female calves who aren’t slaughtered immediately replace their mothers in the dairy herd. But many males end up in miniscule veal crates that intentionally prohibit exercise and normal muscle growth. Kept in darkness, they are fed low-iron milk substitutes so that they will become anemic and their flesh stays pale and tender.

Many suffer from chronic pneumonia, diarrhea and other diseases that are caused by their unhealthy living conditions. These young calves are often just 12 weeks old when they’re sent off for slaughter. Many can barely walk because of disease or muscle atrophy.

More than 8 billion chickens are raised and killed for meat each year — in fetid, windowless sheds that stink of ammonia. To keep up with demand and cut costs, farmers give chicks steady doses of growth-promoting drugs to ensure they reach “processing” weight quickly, often in as little as six weeks.

The hundreds of millions of hens who are raised for their eggs spend their lives in wire-mesh cages that rub off their feathers, chafe their skin and cripple their feet. Chickens can live for a decade, but these hens are so exhausted their egg production wanes after about two years. More than 100 million “spent” hens are slaughtered every year.

Male chicks born on egg farms don’t survive nearly that long. Millions are just a day old when they’re killed, usually in high-speed grinders called “macerators.”

Factory farms don’t want us to know their dirty secrets, but there is a cruel, bloody story behind every piece of animal flesh, cheese or egg on our plates. The silver lining is that we can end this abuse by switching to a humane, healthy, eco-friendly, plant-based diet.

For more info, visit:

http://www.citizensforfarmanimals.com

Zoos: misery behind bars

By Delcianna Winders

Costa Rican officials recently announced that the country’s two zoos will shut their doors within the next year. Animals who can be returned to the jungles, forests and savannahs will know the joy of being where they belong. Those whose health or behavior has been too compromised by their years—or decades—in cramped cages will be placed in sanctuaries.

Around the world, governments are recognizing the fundamental injustice of keeping animals in captivity for our fleeting diversion. Recently, India banned captive-dolphin displays and El Salvador banned animal circuses. So why are the United States and Canada still so far behind when it comes to bringing animal-protection laws into the 21st century?

In zoos, aquariums and theme parks all over North America, tigers pace the length of their cages looking for relief that never comes. Birds are crammed into cages where they can barely spread their wings, much less fly. The few bears who aren’t forced to stand on concrete leave paw impressions in the dirt, where they step in the same spots over and over again. Elephants rock and sway like automatons with no “off” switch. Dolphins swim in endless circles.

The unmitigated monotony of captive animals’ existence goes far beyond mere boredom. Renowned oceanographer Jean-Michel Cousteau reported that he was forever changed after witnessing a captive dolphin commit suicide by ramming his head into a tank’s wall. Orcas in theme-park tanks break off their teeth by trying to chew through the metal bars that separate their pools. Caged chimpanzees chew their own fingers until they are raw and bleeding.

U.S. laws that govern captive animals are astonishingly minimal. Cage-size regulations, for example, require only that animals be given enough space to make “normal postural and social adjustments.” In practice, that means that a cage is “large” enough if an animal can stand up, lie down, turn, and move around a bit. A study conducted by researchers at Oxford University determined that the size of a typical zoo enclosure for polar bears is about one-millionth of the animals’ minimum home-range size.

In their rightful homes, elephants walk up to 30 miles a day. Lions and tigers control vast territories. Wildebeest migrate over the entire Serengeti Plain. Orcas and dolphins effortlessly explore the endless fathoms of the wide-open ocean.

Is it any wonder why some zoos have resorted to doping neurotic bears with anti-depressants to try to curb their anxiety? Or that zoos and aquariums keep a supply of antacids on hand because so many captive dolphins develop ulcers? According to a survey conducted by Franklin Park Zoo veterinarian Hayley Weston and Harvard professor Dr. Michael Mufson, at least 14 zoos have used drugs to control “undesirable” behaviors (read: upsetting to visitors) in captive gorillas.

We consider ourselves to be progressive and compassionate, but continuing to imprison intelligent social animals from birth to death simply for our own amusement is neither.

Think about cutting back on your meat consumption! Please! For the animals!

By Deb Young

The cruelties at processing plants defy belief!

Animals in slaughterhouses can smell, hear, and often see the slaughter of those before them.

As the animals struggle, they’re often abused by frustrated workers, who are under constant pressure to keep the lines moving at rapid speeds.

Workers are often seen kicking cows, ramming them with the blades of a forklift, jabbing them in the eyes, applying painful electrical shocks and even torturing them with a hose and water in attempts to force sick or injured animals to walk to slaughter.

Federal law requires mammals be stunned prior to slaughter .Typically, electric current is used to induce a heart attack and/or seizure; or a captive bolt gun is used to deliver a blow to the skull or shoot a rod into the animal’s brain.

It’s not uncommon for an animal to suffer one or two failed stuns. In the case of a failed electrical stun, an animal may be paralyzed without losing sensibility.Unconscious animals whose necks are not cut soon enough may regain their senses after being hung on the bleed rail. Hogs, unlike cattle, are dunked in tanks of hot water after they are stunned to soften the hides for skinning. As a result, a botched slaughter condemns some hogs to being scalded and drowned. Hogs will squeal and kick as they are being lowered into the water.

Video evidence obtained by one investigator shows slaughter plant workers displaying complete disregard for the pain and misery they inflicted as they repeatedly attempted to force “downed” animals onto their feet and into the human food chain.

Sounds like a good argument to want to cut back on meat to me, how about doing it for your health also!

Processed meat is high in calories, fat and sodium. The more bologna, ham, and sausage that you stuff inside your sub roll or pita will add up to more calories, more fat and more sodium. Too much salt in your body leads to water retention and bloating. Many of these processed meats are casually referred to as “luncheon meats” for good reason. They are easy to slap in between two pieces of bread for a mid-day meal.

Consider the burden you place on your body when you eat hot dogs or processed-meat subs. High levels of sodium weaken blood vessels. This leads to heart disease.

It’s a good bet that reducing meat consumption—particularly processed meat—is likely to score you an advantage. You’ll lower the risk of heart disease and cancer. You’ll consume less calories and fat.

It can be challenging to serve healthy meals on a budget, but with planning you can eat better for less. Many people save money by adding meatless meals to their weekly menus. Meatless meals are built around vegetables, beans and grains — instead of meat, which tends to be more expensive.

The health factor: A plant-based diet, which emphasizes fruits and vegetables, grains, beans and legumes, and nuts, is rich in fiber, vitamins and other nutrients. And people who eat only plant-based foods — aka vegetarians — generally eat fewer calories and less fat, weigh less, and have a lower risk of heart disease than nonvegetarians do.

Just eating less meat has a protective effect. A National Cancer Institute study of 500,000 people found that those who ate 4 ounces (113 grams) of red meat or more daily were 30 percent more likely to have died of any cause during a 10-year period than were those who consumed less. Sausage, luncheon meats and other processed meats also increased the risk. Those who ate mostly poultry or fish had a lower risk of death.

How much protein do you need? The fact is that most Americans get enough protein in their diets. Adults generally need 10 to 35 percent of their total daily calories to come from protein. Based on a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, this amounts to about 50 to 175 grams a day. Of course, you can get protein from sources other than meat.

In fact, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends choosing a variety of protein foods, including eggs, beans and peas, soy products, and unsalted nuts and seeds. The guidelines also suggest replacing protein foods that are higher in solid fats with choices that are lower in solid fats and calories. The fats in meat, poultry and eggs are considered solid fats, while the fats in seafood, nuts and seeds are considered oils.

Just cutting back on meat will help yourself and the animals…Think about it!

Breeding bacteria on factory farms

From The New York Times. – R. T.

By MARK BITTMAN

The story of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in farm animals is not a simple one. But here’s the pitch version: Yet another study has reinforced the idea that keeping animals in confinement and feeding them antibiotics prophylactically breeds varieties of bacteria that cause disease in humans, disease that may not readily be treated by antibiotics. Since some of these bacteria can be fatal, that’s a scary combination.

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are bad enough, but now there are more kinds; they’re better at warding off attack by antibiotics; and they can be transferred to humans by increasingly varied methods. The situation is demonstrably dire.

Two of the examples highlighted in a Food and Drug Administration report are that about 10 percent of all chicken breasts sold at retail are contaminated with a form of salmonella that’s resistant to at least one antibiotic, and nearly half of all chicken that’s sold is contaminated with antibiotic-resistant campylobacter. Some of the antibiotics in question are used to treat sick people but are also used daily in raising livestock. And it seems that these livestock, especially ones raised by contemporary industrial means, are a breeding ground for making these and other bacteria more resistant [1] . …

To read entire piece, click here!

 

 

 

 

 

Public joins Humane Society in urging Harvard University to prohibit severe animal suffering

More Than 26,000 People Call for New Lab Policy

(Dec. 7, 2011) — The Humane Society of the United States sent letters from 26,688 members of the public to Harvard University and 387 other federally-funded colleges and universities, urging the schools to adopt a formal policy that would protect animals in their laboratories from severe pain and distress. The signers of the letters oppose the use of tax dollars to support activities at the schools’ laboratories that cause severe animal suffering.

“Americans don’t want to pay for animal research that causes suffering,” said Kathleen Conlee, senior director for animal research issues for The HSUS. “Harvard, which receives public funding for its animal research, is well known as an elite educational institution—it’s time for the university to lead the way in its commitment to animal welfare.”

The schools receiving the request for the new policy receive an estimated $6 billion in federal funding per year to conduct animal research. In 2010 Harvard received over $370 million in federal funds for research that includes experiments involving more than 180,000 monkeys, farm animals, cats, dogs, rats, rabbits and other animals used each year at the university.

Federal laws do not prohibit laboratory research or conditions that cause severe pain and distress in animals, but more than 60 colleges and universities have adopted their own policies that do.

Methods to prevent severe pain and distress for animals in laboratories could include:

Using non-animal alternatives when possible.
Properly using anesthetics and painkillers.
Decreasing duration and intensity of stressors.
Determining the most humane time to end the experiment.
Preparing for emergency situations.

Background
Since 2008, The HSUS has asked Harvard four times to adopt a policy that would prevent severe pain or distress, however the university has yet to adopt such a policy.
#

Media Contact: Anna West, 301-258-1518, awest@humanesociety.org.
Follow The HSUS on Twitter. See our work for animals on your Apple or Android device by searching for our “HumaneTV” app.

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest animal protection organization — backed by 11 million Americans, or one of every 28. For more than a half-century, The HSUS has been fighting for the protection of all animals through advocacy, education and hands-on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty — On the Web at humanesociety.org.
Severe Animal Suffering

More Than 26,000 People Call for New Lab Policy

(Dec. 7, 2011) — The Humane Society of the United States sent letters from 26,688 members of the public to Harvard University and 387 other federally-funded colleges and universities, urging the schools to adopt a formal policy that would protect animals in their laboratories from severe pain and distress. The signers of the letters oppose the use of tax dollars to support activities at the schools’ laboratories that cause severe animal suffering.

“Americans don’t want to pay for animal research that causes suffering,” said Kathleen Conlee, senior director for animal research issues for The HSUS. “Harvard, which receives public funding for its animal research, is well known as an elite educational institution—it’s time for the university to lead the way in its commitment to animal welfare.”

The schools receiving the request for the new policy receive an estimated $6 billion in federal funding per year to conduct animal research. In 2010 Harvard received over $370 million in federal funds for research that includes experiments involving more than 180,000 monkeys, farm animals, cats, dogs, rats, rabbits and other animals used each year at the university.

Federal laws do not prohibit laboratory research or conditions that cause severe pain and distress in animals, but more than 60 colleges and universities have adopted their own policies that do.

Methods to prevent severe pain and distress for animals in laboratories could include:
Using non-animal alternatives when possible.
Properly using anesthetics and painkillers.
Decreasing duration and intensity of stressors.
Determining the most humane time to end the experiment.
Preparing for emergency situations.

Background
Since 2008, The HSUS has asked Harvard four times to adopt a policy that would prevent severe pain or distress, however the university has yet to adopt such a policy.
#

Media Contact: Anna West, 301-258-1518, awest@humanesociety.org.
Follow The HSUS on Twitter. See our work for animals on your Apple or Android device by searching for our “HumaneTV” app.

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest animal protection organization — backed by 11 million Americans, or one of every 28. For more than a half-century, The HSUS has been fighting for the protection of all animals through advocacy, education and hands-on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty — On the Web at humanesociety.org.

It’s up to us to stop puppy mills (Don’t buy puppies at pet stores or on-line!)

By Lindsay Pollard-Post

Dogs are suffering and dying in puppy mills across the country, but the agency in charge of regulating animal breeding facilities is doing next to nothing to help these dogs, according to an eye-opening report just released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s inspector general. In one Oklahoma puppy mill, inspectors found five dead dogs lying among other dogs who were so starved that they were cannibalizing their cage mates. The USDA didn’t rescue the survivors, and 22 more dogs perished.

Dogs in other puppy mills were found living on piles of feces. Some dogs were crawling with ticks and suffering from open wounds, but puppy mill operators were rarely penalized for first offenses—even serious ones—and repeat offenders were frequently let off the hook. Continue reading It’s up to us to stop puppy mills (Don’t buy puppies at pet stores or on-line!)