Tag Archives: sweaters

Webster Square: Saver’s Thrift Shop closing! Everything in store half off!

CAM00260-1

We’ve found some cool stuff at Savers through the years! Skirts, sweaters, dresses, jackets …

They have shoes, children’s gear … nighties and … Hey, if stuff is selling for a buck or two, it’s a sale worth checking out!

The HUGE store is located in the strip mall next to the old Webster Square cinema building!

AND, last but not least: They donate a percentage of their profits to the Worcester Boys and Girls Club.

Do some creative Holiday shopping, Creatives! Visit Savers!

text + pic: R. Tirella

Help the homeless stay warm!

We posted this info weeks ago … in case you’ve forgotten …

CAM00345

Warm Winter Clothing Drive For the Homeless

Pleasant Street Baptist Church

165 Pleasant St.

10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Saturday, January 24

Go through your closets this coming week! If you, your partner and/or kids don’t wear it any more, DONATE IT!

Volunteers will be accepting winter coats, jackets, sweaters, hats, mittens, gloves, socks, scarves … For men, women, teens, even little kids …

Free coffee and donuts for all who stop by and make a donation!

Go, Worcester, go!

– R. T.

Looking for last-minute holiday gifts such as … vintage goodies, clothing and household items?

CAM00922 (1)A few months ago my neighbor gave me this blouse and other goodies. What I didn’t use I donated to non-profits, with one very nice pair of shoes (new) going to Abby’s. … All your donations are tax-deductible.   – R. Tirella

… then shop where our Parlee Jones works – ABBY’S HOUSE!

52 High St., Worcester

Parlee runs their homeless shelter; she places women, often fleeing domestic violence, in safe spaces.

By shopping at Abby’s House THRIFT SHOP (52 High St., across the street from St. Paul’s Cathedral) you support the shelter and the homeless women for whom it spells HOME.

Lots of greats buys! Lots of items Diamonds in the Rough! Don’t forget! The money you spend at the shop goes towards supporting Worcester’s iconic women’s shelter.

***************

Learn more (from their website):

Abby’s House Thrift Shop

The Abby’s House Thrift Shop continues to be our largest single source of revenue.

All of the profits from sales at the Thrift Shop fund our emergency shelter.

The Thrift Shop is full of quality clothing, accessories, home goods, and bargain-priced cosmetics.

We encourage you to visit the store today, not only to donate clothing and homegoods, but to add some great pieces to your wardrobe!

Hours:

Monday through Thursday: 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

Fridays: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Saturdays: 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

The Thrift Shop is closed on holidays. When Worcester Public Schools declares a snow day, the Thrift Shop will be closed.

In case of bad weather, please call ahead to make sure we’re open: (508) 756-5486 extension 12.

Making Donations:

Donations are accepted during regular shop hours. We are happy to accept gently used, seasonal women’s clothing in good condition and household items of all kinds including kitchenware, lamps and decorative items. New, unopened health and beauty products are also welcome.

At times we are in need of furniture in good condition that may be used to set up an apartment, such as small kitchen sets or desk sets. If you would like to make a furniture donation, please call ahead.

We do NOT accept books, computers, TVs, furniture, records, record players, hangers, used pillows, men’s clothing or used children’s clothing and toys.

Please note that due to the new laws regarding child safety we can only accept children’s clothing or toys if they are NEW, in package or tagged.

CLICK HERE to visit the Abby’s House website to learn more!

Why I won’t wear wool this winter

By Paula Moore

I’ve been an animal rights advocate for more than two decades, and during that time I’ve come to believe that the animals killed in the name of fashion are some of the most abused beings on the planet. Foxes on fur farms spend their whole lives pacing the wire floor of a tiny cage, slowly losing their minds from the extreme confinement and deprivation. On angora rabbit farms, workers violently rip the fur out of rabbits’ skin as the animals scream in pain. Snakes are nailed to trees and skinned alive in the belief that live flaying keeps their skin supple.

But recent footage released by PETA highlighting cruelty documented at 19 wool sheds in Australia—the world’s leading exporter of wool—and on 14 ranches in the U.S. has shocked even many veteran PETA staffers. Shearing sheep for their wool is a violent process that leaves these gentle animals battered and bloodied. I urge everyone reading this to watch the videos on PETA’s website—and then trade in your wool sweaters and jackets for animal-friendly options.

In the wool industry, time is money, and since most shearers are paid by volume, not by the hour, they have an incentive to work as quickly as they can, with little regard for the sheep’s welfare. One worker can shear up to 27 sheep—or 35 lambs—every single hour.

PETA’s investigators in Australia documented that shearers punched the struggling sheep, poked them in the eyes and routinely jabbed them in the face with sharp clippers, leaving them bleeding. In the investigative footage, one sheep’s face can be seen with blood soaking the wool all around it.

Workers stomp on sheep and stand on their heads and necks. They grab and drag sheep by their legs and slam them against the hard floor of the shearing shed. The ordeal doesn’t end until the sheep are completely shorn—and many of the animals are literally thrown down chutes into holding pens.

Terrified lambs, taken from their loving mothers, cry out before and during their first shearing. “They’ve been separated from their mums and they’re calling for them,” one worker explained. “They’re going, ‘Mom! Mom!'”

Because the shearers work so quickly, most sheep are cut—some severely—on their abdomen, hindquarters and limbs. When this happens, workers use a needle and thread to try to sew shut the most gaping wounds—without painkillers and in the same unsterile environment in which the sheep were shorn. Many sheep also have swaths of skin cut or pulled off during shearing. One worker even cut off three sheep’s tails with clippers.

The investigators never saw anyone reprimanded for their callous treatment of the sheep—or any veterinary care administered to them. Instead, injured sheep were shot in full view of their companions. One was butchered, and the body was left where other sheep could see it.

PETA’s investigator in the U.S. documented similar abuses. One shearer repeatedly twisted and bent a sheep’s neck, breaking it. At another ranch, workers hauled a critically ill ram—struggling to breathe—into a trailer to be sheared. The ram was left in the trailer overnight and was found dead the next morning.

Most people would agree that electrocuting foxes for their fur or ripping the skin off live snakes and leaving them to writhe in agony is wrong. The pain and fear endured by sheep in the wool industry are just as real as the suffering of other animals used and abused for their skins.

PETA’s videos are hard to watch. If you care about animals at all, they will upset you. But these animals don’t need our tears. They need our action. When you see the word “wool” on a coat label, please remember the sheep who were beaten bloody and dragged along the floor by their hind legs. And leave that item on the rack.

Something to think about during this gift-giving season: Can angora production ever be ethical?

From The Guardian. Please, be kind to all animals! – R. T.

A shocking Peta video of a Chinese angora farm, showing live rabbits having their fur ripped off, has prompted retailers to halt orders of angora wool. So is it possible to farm these rabbits commercially and be kind to them?

Angora composite 

What price a fluffy sweater? Angora rabbits farmed in China are locked alone in filthy cages.

We’ll always have Paris, Texas. But now we’ve seen the video of a Chinese angora farm, will we ever look at Nastassja Kinski’s backless sweater in the same way again? A rabbit is screaming, as best it can, while chunks of its wonderful soft fur are ripped away to leave just a bald, raw and bleeding body. Rows and rows more rabbits are locked alone in filthy cages, waiting for their turn.

These, according to People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (Peta), based on the 10 farms they visited, are standard conditions for angora rabbits in China, where around 90% of the world’s angora wool is now produced. Certainly there are no laws there to prevent people plucking rabbits, which yields longer hairs, and thus more valuable yarn, and is quicker to do. Topshop, H&M, Boden, Primark and dozens of other retailers have halted orders immediately.

To learn more and read the entire story, click here!