Tag Archives: U.S. Navy

The U.S. Navy – seldom yummy?

From the U.S. Navy! Go, Baylee Smith, go!!!!!:

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Officers Training Corps (NROTC) midshipman 1st Class Baylee Smith, from Oakham, participates in Surface Warfare Officer Ship Selection (U.S. Navy photo by Audio-Visual Production Specialist Dustan Burke/Released)

Oakham Native participates in NROTC Ship Selection Draft

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jamal McNeill, Navy Office of Community Outreach

Navy Midshipman Baylee Smith from Oakham participated in the Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) ship selection draft as a future member of the U.S. Navy’s Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) community.

More than 280 midshipmen at 70 Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) units around the country have selected to serve in the Navy as surface warfare officers. Each selecting midshipman is ranked according to his or her grade point average, aptitude scores, and physical fitness.

“The Morehouse NROTC unit is an attachment of the Atlanta Region Consortium with GA Tech,” said Smith. “Since Spelman does not have its own NROTC program, students from Spelman are a cross affiliation to the Morehouse NROTC program.”

Years of hard work, dedication, and exceptional performance have led Smith to be ranked in the top-5 of all midshipmen nationally. The top-5 ranked midshipmen had the opportunity be the first to select which ship they would like to be on to start their promising Naval career, during a Google Hangout videoconference conducted by the Navy Personnel Command in Millington, Tennessee. This is the first time midshipmen have used the videoconference versus a phone to select their ship and it allows these distinguished midshipmen to share this great milestone with their loved ones back home.

“The SWO Ship Selection to me is a competitive race to choose the best location and type of ship that fits your career,” said Smith.
Smith, a 2012 Quabbin Regional High School graduate, has selected to serve aboard the USS John Finn (DDG 113), and is majoring in economics while attending Spelman. Upon graduation, Muth will receive a commission as a Navy Ensign and report aboard the John Finn as a surface warfare officer.

USS John Finn is the 63rd Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer in the U.S. Navy. The ship named after John William Fin, the first Medal of Honor recipient of World War II. John Finn has not been commissioned and Smith has the opportunity to be apart of the crew that takes the ship on its first mission.

The midshipmen’s selection of their ship is not only a milestone for them but also an important day for the ships in the fleet. Not only do the midshipmen choose where they are going to start their Naval career, but the ship they choose will also gain a motivated, eager, young officer to help lead and improve an already great team.

“This is an exciting day,” said Rear Adm. Stephen C. Evans, commander, Naval Service Training Command (NSTC), which oversees the NROTC program. “We have some of the finest talent in our nation and we have the opportunity to marry them up with some of our finest teams in our fleet.”

Evans also told the midshipmen that should be excited, because they have a great future ahead of them on some of the Navy’s best platforms around the world.

While NROTC units are spread out across the country and vary in size, they all teach midshipmen the values, standards, abilities and responsibility that it takes to become a Navy officers and lead this nations sons and daughters in protecting freedom on the seven seas.

“NROTC has challenged me to face my weaknesses and learn how to improve them,” said Smith. “Many of the traits such as organization, time management, and the ability to lead peers has transferred in other professional and personal realms.”

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“Why Being There Matters”

On our planet, more than 70 percent of which is covered by water, being there means having the ability to act from the sea.

The Navy is uniquely positioned to be there; the world’s oceans give the Navy the power to protect America’s interests anywhere, and at any time. Your Navy protects and defends America on the world’s oceans.

Navy ships, submarines, aircraft and, most importantly, tens of thousands of America’s finest young men and women are deployed around the world doing just that.

They are there now. They will be there when we are sleeping tonight. They will be there every Saturday, Sunday and holiday this year. They are there around the clock, far from our shores, defending America at all times.

Thank you very much for your support of the men and women in U.S. Navy, deployed around the clock and ready to protect and defend America on the world’s oceans.

In fashion! The U.S. Navy Band! Performance at Mechanics Hall March 9!

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FREE TO ALL!

America’s Navy is coming to Worcester, one of 23 cities in five states to host a performance by the United States Navy Band during its 2016 tour – one of the Navy’s signature outreach programs.

The United States Navy Band Concert Band performance is scheduled for March 9, 12 p.m. at Mechanics Hall.

The Navy Concert Band, the premier wind ensemble of the U.S. Navy, presents a wide array of marches, patriotic selections, orchestral transcriptions and modern wind ensemble repertoire.

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As the original ensemble of the Navy Band, the Concert Band has been performing public concerts and participating in high-profile events for nearly 90 years.

One of the U.S. Navy Band’s primary responsibilities involves touring the country.

All of the band’s primary performing units embark each year on concert tours throughout specified regions of the country, allowing the band to reach out to audiences in areas of the country that do not have opportunities to see the Navy’s premier musical ensembles on a regular basis.

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The concerts are family-friendly events, meant to be entertaining to veterans, families, individuals and those interested in joining the Navy.

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All Navy Band performances are free and open to the public.

Go, Donald J. Trinque, go!!!

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U.S. Navy Petty Officer Donald J. Trinque

Petty Officer Donald J. Trinque, of Ayer, has served in the U.S. Navy for three years as an aviation ordananceman. He is a 2007 Ayer High School graduate and was recently selected as USS Harry S. Truman’s Warrior of the day for December 1, 2015.

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“Why Being There Matters”

On our planet, more than 70 percent of which is covered by water, being there means having the ability to act from the sea. The Navy is uniquely positioned to be there; the world’s oceans give the Navy the power to protect America’s interests anywhere, and at any time. Your Navy protects and defends America on the world’s oceans. Navy ships, submarines, aircraft and, most importantly, tens of thousands of America’s finest young men and women are deployed around the world doing just that. They are there now. They will be there when we are sleeping tonight. They will be there every Saturday, Sunday and holiday this year.  They are there around the clock, far from our shores, defending America at all times.

Thank you very much for your support of the men and women in U.S. Navy, deployed around the clock and ready to protect and defend America on the world’s oceans.

From the U.S. Navy …

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Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class Jeffrey T. Egan

Grafton native and 2007 St. Peter Marian High School graduate, Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class Jeffrey T. Egan, was recognized as Warrior of the Day, September 18, aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75).

He was selected from a crew of more than 3,000 sailors.

The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group is underway participating in a Composite Training Unit Exercise in preparation for a future deployment.

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“Why Being There Matters”

On our planet, more than 70 percent of which is covered by water, being there means having the ability to act from the sea. The Navy is uniquely positioned to be there; the world’s oceans give the Navy the power to protect America’s interests anywhere, and at any time.

Your Navy protects and defends America on the world’s oceans. Navy ships, submarines, aircraft and, most importantly, tens of thousands of America’s finest young men and women are deployed around the world doing just that. They are there now. They will be there when we are sleeping tonight. They will be there every Saturday, Sunday and holiday this year.  They are there around the clock, far from our shores, defending America at all times.

Thank you very much for your support of the men and women in U.S. Navy, deployed around the clock and ready to protect and defend America on the world’s oceans.

Go, Tyler Cowen, go!!!!!!

Ashford, Conn., native keeping seas free in the Middle East

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Petty Officer 2nd Class Tyler Cowen is a Navy mineman

By LT Philip Fortnam, Navy Office of Community Outreach

MANAMA, Bahrain – A 2009 Wyndham Technical Regional High School graduate and Ashford, Connecticut, native is helping the U. S. Navy keep sea lanes safe and open in the Middle East, serving on the mine countermeasures ship USS Sentry (MCM-3).

Petty Officer 2nd Class Tyler Cowen is a Navy mineman and lives and works at a Navy base in Manama, Bahrain, where the Sentry is based.  Bahrain is a small island country situated near the western shores of the Arabian Gulf.

A Navy mineman is responsible for working with weapons, deck rigging and is a hybrid between gunner’s mates, boatswain’s mate and operations specialist.

“I like the fact that I can do multiple things in the course of the day as a hybrid sailor,” said Cowen.

The Sentry was commissioned in 1989 and is the second Navy ship to bear this name. It is one of the Navy’s 11 Avenger-class mine countermeasures ships that are designed to remove mines from vital waterways and harbors.

“It’s a small ship and you really get to know everybody aboard,” said Cowen.

The Sentry is 224 feet long, 39 feet wide and displaces 1,312 tons of water. It is powered by four diesel engines and can reach speeds of more than 16 mph.

With approximately eight officers and 80 enlisted comprising the ship’s company, jobs are highly varied which keeps the ship mission ready — this includes everything from washing dishes and preparing meals to handling weaponry and maintaining the propulsion system.

As a member of the crew, Cowen and other Sentry sailors know they are part of a forward-deployed naval forces team that is heavily relied upon to help protect and defend America on the world’s oceans.

“I’m enjoying the experience of visiting different countries, cultural experiences and foods,” said Cowen.

In addition to the Sentry, three other Avenger-class mine countermeasures ships are forward deployed in Bahrain along with ten Cyclone-class coastal patrol ships.

The world is increasingly complex and crewmembers aboard the Sentry, as well as the other forward-deployed naval vessels in Bahrain, assist with assuring international sea lines between the Middle East and Europe remain open and help protect against possible maritime threats.

As a Sailor with numerous responsibilities, deployed half-way around the world away from friends and family back home, Cowen said he is learning about himself as a leader, Sailor and a person.

“I’ve learned a lot,” said Cowen. “The Navy trained me to learn at a fast pace, to adapt and discover the best path to get a difficult job done quickly and safely.”

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Why Being There Matters”

On our planet, more than 70 percent of which is covered by water, being there means having the ability to act from the sea. The Navy is uniquely positioned to be there; the world’s oceans give the Navy the power to protect America’s interests anywhere, and at any time.

Your Navy protects and defends America on the world’s oceans. Navy ships, submarines, aircraft and, most importantly, tens of thousands of America’s finest young men and women are deployed around the world doing just that.

They are there now. They will be there when we are sleeping tonight. They will be there every Saturday, Sunday and holiday this year. They are there around the clock, far from our shores, defending America at all times.

Go, Billy Giardillo, go!

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Seaman Billy Giardillo 

FROM THE U.S. NAVY:

By MC1 James Green

SAN DIEGO – Billy Giardillo, a 2010 North Providence High School graduate and North Providence native, is serving on one of the world’s largest warships, the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan.

Seaman Giardillo is an undesignated seaman aboard the San Diego-based ship, a Nimitz-class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and one of only ten operational aircraft carriers in the Navy today.

“My job is the general preservation of the ship through painting and maintenance,” said Giardillo

Named in honor of former President Ronald Reagan, the carrier is longer than 3 football fields, at nearly 1,100 feet long. The ship is 252 feet wide and weighs more than 100,000 tons. Two nuclear reactors can push the ship through the water at nearly 35 mph.

As a sailor with numerous responsibilities, Giardillo said he is proud to serve his country aboard an aircraft carrier.

“The people here are great. I like how everyone gets along like a family and you know that they have your back,” said Giardillo.

Giardillo also said he is very proud of the work he is doing as part of USS Ronald Reagan’s nearly 3,000-member crew, helping protect America on the world’s oceans.

Sailors’ jobs are highly varied aboard USS Ronald Reagan. Nearly 3,000 men and women make up the ship’s company, which keeps all parts of the aircraft carrier running smoothly — this includes everything from washing dishes and preparing meals to handling weaponry and maintaining the nuclear reactors. Another 2,000 or so form the air wing, the people who actually fly and maintain the aircraft.

“I never cease to be impressed with the type and quality of work that goes on aboard the carrier each day,” said Capt. Christopher E. Bolt, the carrier’s commanding officer. “Our team is filled with highly qualified young adults – in many cases, 19 and 20 years old – and they’re out here launching and recovering aircraft, running a complex propulsion system safely, serving as air traffic controllers, operating sophisticated electronics, and keeping this floating city alive and functioning. Their work ethic, enthusiasm, and esprit de corps are second to none. If you pick up a newspaper in any city and examine what other 19- and 20-year-olds are doing, there is no comparison to the level of responsibility our Sailors hold. That caliber of Sailor is what has earned us the title of America’s Flagship.”

USS Ronald Reagan is also a self-sustaining, mobile airport and, like each of the Navy’s aircraft carriers, is designed for a 50-year service life. While underway, the ship carries more than 70 jets, helicopters and other aircraft, all of which take off from and land on the carrier’s 4.5-acre flight deck. Four powerful catapults launch aircraft off the bow of the ship. After lowering a tail hook that protrudes from the rear of the aircraft, jets and aircraft land by snagging a steel cable called an arresting wire.

After an extended maintenance period spent pier side in San Diego, USS Ronald Reagan is preparing for its move to Japan, as part of the first ever three-hull aircraft carrier crew and hull swap. It will replace USS George Washington in Japan and become part of the U.S. 7th Fleet forward-deployed naval forces (FDNF) in Yokosuka, Japan. As part of this rebalance strategy to increase the Navy’s presence in the Pacific Fleet, USS Theodore Roosevelt will move from Norfolk, Va., to San Diego.

In 2008, George Washington was the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier sent to Japan as part of the FDNF. Maintaining a FDNF capability supports the United States’ commitment to the defense of Japan and the security and stability of the vital Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Giardillo and other USS Ronald Reagan sailors know they are part of an agile and skilled team standing ready to defend America.

The Navy is uniquely positioned to be there, on the world’s oceans, patrolling what is essentially the world’s interstate ocean highway system. The U.S. Navy ensures the free flow of global trade which, in turn, preserves America’s economic prosperity. When it comes to protecting and defending America, being there matters. And America’s Navy is already there.

“I enjoy the fact the Navy has given me the opportunity to experience different things like traveling,” said Giardillo.

Go, Lieutenant Michael Batcheller, go!

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Lieutenant Michael Batcheller   

FROM THE U.S. NAVY:

By Lt. j.g. Christopher Hanson, Navy Office of Community Outreach Public Affairs

SAN DIEGO – Lieutenant Michael Batcheller, a 2002 Grafton High School graduate and Grafton native, is serving aboard USS New Orleans (LPD 18), one of the Navy’s newest and most advanced amphibious ships, designed to deliver Marines and their equipment to and from war zones.

Batcheller is a dentist aboard the San Diego-based San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship. The ship is longer than two football fields at 684 feet, 105 feet wide and weighs more than 24,000 tons. Four diesel engines can push the ship through the water at more than 24 mph.

USS New Orleans is the fourth Navy ship to be named for the city of New Orleans, and is the second vessel in the San Antonio-class of high-tech amphibious assault ships.

As a 31 year-old with numerous responsibilities, Batcheller said he is learning about himself as a leader, sailor and a person. He added that it is an exciting time to be in the Navy, and serving aboard a ship has truly made him a better person. “The Navy has taught me to hone my leadership abilities and develop a great attitude in dealing with all issues that arise. My Navy experiences will help me throughout life,” said Batcheller.

He also said he is proud of the work he is doing as part of the New Orleans’ 427-member crew, protecting and defending America on the world’s oceans. “Our forward presence helps to neutralize any threats to our national and economic security,” Batcheller explained.

Sailors’ jobs are highly varied aboard USS New Orleans. Approximately 46 officers and 381 enlisted men and women make up the ship’s company, which keeps all parts of the ship running smoothly — this includes everything from washing dishes and preparing meals to handling weaponry and maintaining the engines. Another 700 or so form the deployable Marine Corps battalion and New Orleans is capable of transporting the battalion and landing them in hostile territory via helicopters, vertical takeoff and landing aircraft and air-cushioned landing craft.

“New Orleans is truly a fine warship and it is our duty to bring her to life,” said Capt. Doug Verissimo, the ship’s commanding officer. “Our Sailors have been working very hard bringing her from a post-deployment repair period to our upcoming tactical integration with our Marine teammates. I feel an unparalleled sense of pride working alongside our nation’s finest.”

Collectively, the San Antonio-class ships will functionally replace more than 41 ships providing the Navy and Marine Corps with modern sea-based platforms. Amphibious transport dock ships are warships that embark, transport, and land elements of a landing force for a variety of expeditionary warfare missions. These ships support amphibious assault, special operations or expeditionary warfare missions and can serve as secondary aviation platforms for amphibious ready groups. Because of their inherent capabilities, these ships have been and will continue to be called upon to also support humanitarian and other contingency missions on short notice.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s high-tech amphibious assault ships, Batcheller and other New Orleans sailors are proud to part of a warfighting team that readily defends America at all times.

“I enjoy meeting the different people in the Navy and around the world,” Batcheller said. “Our junior Sailors keep me feeling young.”

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“Why Being There Matters”

On our planet, more than 70 percent of which is covered by water, being there means having the ability to act from the sea. The Navy is uniquely positioned to be there; the world’s oceans give the Navy the power to protect America’s interests anywhere, and at any time. Your Navy protects and defends America on the world’s oceans. Navy ships, submarines, aircraft and, most importantly, tens of thousands of America’s finest young men and women are deployed around the world doing just that. They are there now. They will be there when we are sleeping tonight. They will be there every Saturday, Sunday and holiday this year. They are there around the clock, far from our shores, defending America at all times. 

Thank you very much for your support of the men and women in U.S. Navy, deployed around the clock and ready to protect and defend America on the world’s oceans.

Go, Worcester’s Ian Macgregor, go!!!

2014 Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic Sailors of the Year

Aviation Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Ian Macgregor

FROM THE U.S. NAVY:

Ian Macgregor: One of the Navy’s Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year

NORFOLK, Va. – Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic (CNAL) announced the selection of the Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year during a luncheon aboard Naval Station Norfolk, March 5.

Rear Adm. J.R. Haley, commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, announced Aviation Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Ian Macgregor as the CNAL Sea Sailor of the Year and Naval Aircrewmen (Avionics) 1st Class William Ballard as the CNAL Shore Sailor of the Year.

“They are 21st century Sailors, they are experts of their field, leaders of leaders and pillars in the community. They are absolutely remarkable. First class petty officer is the most difficult rate in the Navy, and I would wager that the chiefs who were first class petty officers would agree. The expectation of a first class petty officer is that you work at the chief’s level, you work at the junior officer level, and that you do it without any of the authorities that a chief or an officer has. You do all that for sheer leadership,” said Haley.

The two Sailors were selected from 10 candidates representing more than 40,000 men and women serving in the sea and shore components within Naval Air Force Atlantic. Each represented their respective commands after being selected as that commands Sailor of the Year.

Macgregor is a native of Worcester. He enlisted in the United States Navy in 1999 and is currently assigned to Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 46 in Mayport, Florida.

“It feels amazing. I’m only here because of my shipmates, my mentors and my friends,” said Macgregor. “This has been humbling, just to meet this group of people and to see what the level of performance that the competition is, it’s absolutely humbling, and I’m honored.”

Ballard is a native of Ponchatoula, Louisiana. He enlisted in the United States Navy in 1998 and is currently assigned to Patrol Squadron THIRTY in Jacksonville, Florida.

“The whole experience has been humbling, I couldn’t have done it without my chain of command and the support of my fiancée,” said Ballard. “It’s been surreal, I didn’t expect to win today by any means, I had a lot of good competition, and now we’re probably friends for life.”

Both Sailors will advance to the next selection process to determine the Sailors of the Year for U.S. Fleet Forces Command.

Navy Reserve celebrates its centennial March 3

Navy Reserve Centennial

 

Washington DC – The Navy Reserve will mark its centennial anniversary Tuesday, March 3, with a series of events starting in Washington DC and continuing at installations around the country during the year. The events will highlight the history of the Navy Reserve and the remarkable contributions Reserve Sailors have made to the nation’s security.

“Our Centennial commemoration is a truly a once in a lifetime opportunity to highlight the Reserve Sailors for their service, and that of their families, to America.” said, Vice Admiral Robin Braun. “We want to recognize our rich history and heritage with all of our Sailors, both past and present.”

For 100 years Navy Reserve Sailors have answered our nation’s call in times of war and peace.  From communities across America, young men and women left their homes and jobs, trading out civilian clothes for Navy uniforms. From its earliest days, the Navy Reserve has reflected the face of the nation, welcoming members from every race, color, creed and gender to strengthen our Force.

HISTORY OF NAVY RESERVE 1915-2015

Congress authorized the establishment of the Federal Naval Reserve on March 3, 1915. Initially, the only Sailors eligible to enroll were enlisted Navy veterans. On August 29, 1916, with the prospect of America’s entry into World War I looming, the Navy Reserve reorganized to allow the enrollment of non-veterans and was designated as the U.S. Naval Reserve Force.

When the U.S. entered World War I on April 6, 1917, there were 8,000 Sailors serving in the Navy Reserve Force. When the fighting ended on November 11, 1918, more than 250,000 Reserve Sailors were on active duty, which was more than half of the war-time Navy. These Sailors included 12,000 pioneering women – who were all released from active duty by 1920 not to serve again until World War II.

During World War II, the Navy Reserve contributed 84 percent of the Navy’s manpower. Navy Reserve Sailors in World War II included five future U.S. Presidents – John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, George H.W. Bush – and 15 recipients of the Medal of Honor.

More than 22,000 Reserve Sailors were mobilized for the first Gulf War in the first post-Cold War test of the Force, and since September 11, 2001, there have been more than 70,000 Selected Reserve mobilizations, along with an additional 4,500 deployments by Full Time Support Sailors, including more than 8,000 who have done a second combat tour.

Navy Reserve Sailors deliver essential skills and capabilities to the Navy and Joint Forces wherever and whenever needed. They possess in-depth knowledge and experience that complement critical Navy missions and provide best-practices, technical skills, process management and demonstrated leadership from vastly different work cultures to the Navy.

With nearly one quarter of the Navy Reserve Force providing support to the active duty Navy on any given day, today’s Navy Reserve is the most combat and operationally experienced Force in decades.

Navy Reserve Sailors are patriots who balance the demands of family life, civilian careers, community service and the United States Navy, bringing diverse, dedicated backgrounds from all walks of life. Navy Reserve Sailors are successful because of the magnificent support they get from their families, employers and friends throughout their community.

The U.S. Navy Reserve – Ready then. Ready now. Ready always.

For information on Centennial events, as well as the history and heritage of the Navy Reserve, please visit www.navyreservecentennial.com.

To view the Navy Reserve history video, please go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RasZBIPmouw.

Go, Dylan Swist, go! From the U.S. Navy

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Story by Navy Office of Community Outreach

YOKOSUKA, Japan – A 2012 Palmer High School graduate and Bondsville native, Dylan Swist is serving aboard the U.S. Navy destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62), living and working at the Navy’s forward-deployed base south of Tokyo.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Dylan Swist is a fire controlman aboard the destroyer operating out of Yokosuka, which is located approximately 35 miles south of Tokyo and accommodates the United States’ furthest forward-deployed naval forces.

An Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, Fitzgerald is 505 feet long or more than 1 1/2 football fields. The ship is 66 feet wide, weighs more than 9,200 tons, and its four gas turbine engines can push the ship through the ocean at nearly 35 miles per hour. The ship is named in honor of Lt. William Charles Fitzgerald, who was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for extraordinary heroism on August 7, 1967 in Vietnam.

As a Sailor with numerous responsibilities, Swist said he is proud to serve his country aboard a destroyer in Japan.

“I am responsible for the upkeep and management of the tactical tomahawk weapons system,” said Swist.

Swist also said he is proud of the work he is doing as part of the Fitzgerald’s 300-member crew, living thousands of miles from home, and protecting America on the world’s oceans.

“This ship has a great community aspect that feels like a family,” said Swist.

“Fitzgerald sailors represent every state in the union as well as a diversity of ethnicities. It is an honor to lead and serve with the finest sailors the nation has to offer,” said Cmdr. Chris England, the ship’s Commanding Officer. “These sailors should be justifiably proud of their accomplishments – a direct reflection of their dedication to mission accomplishment, motivation, and commitment to the Navy.”

Approximately 40 officers and 260 enlisted men make up the ship’s company. Their jobs are highly specialized and keep each part of the 2 billion dollar destroyer running smoothly — this includes everything from washing dishes and preparing meals to maintaining engines and handling weaponry.

Fast, maneuverable, and technically advanced, destroyers provide the required warfighting expertise and operational flexibility to execute any tasking overseas. With multi-mission capabilities in surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, anti-air warfare, ballistic missile defense, and humanitarian assistance, Arleigh Burke destroyers excel as the Navy’s premier fighting warship.

Assigned to U.S. Seventh Fleet, Fitzgerald sailors are continuously on watch throughout the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, acting as America’s first responders in that part of the world.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most versatile combat ships, Swist and other Fitzgerald sailors understand they are part of a forward-deployed team that is heavily relied upon to help protect and defend America across the world’s oceans.

“I am thankful that the Navy has given me a great opportunity to travel,” said Swist.