Tag Archives: vegetarianism

The whole country is eating no/less meat!!! HOORAY!

Excellent article from the Wall Street Journal!! What we’ve been telling you for years! Eating meat wrecks the planet, your waistline, your cholesterol level, your heart … To read entire story, CLICK HERE!     – R.T.

Meat on the Side: Modern Menus Shift the Focus to Vegetables

Anchoring a plate with a massive hunk of animal protein is so last century. But let’s face it: Vegetarianism isn’t for everyone. Increasingly, chefs like Jody Adams in Boston, Michael Solomonov in Philadelphia and Alain Ducasse in Paris are finding delicious ways to strike a balance between health and hedonism

 

November is National Diabetes Month: More than 25 million Americans have diabetes! Here’s what you can do to stay healthy!

By William M. Mullins, C.P.

The man sitting in my office had just undergone his third amputation in as many years. First, doctors amputated his right foot after a blister refused to heal and gangrene set in. Then, they cut off the leg just below the knee. Now, he had graduated to “AK” (above the knee). He was losing his leg, inch by inch, to “Big Mac attacks.”

As someone who makes prosthetic limbs for a living, I see a lot of tragedy: children who have lost limbs to cancer, motorcycle accident victims, farmers who’ve lost arms in agricultural machinery. But perhaps the most tragic cases of all are the diabetics who’ve essentially cut off their own legs with a knife and fork.

Diabetes has become an epidemic. More than 25 million Americans have diabetes, and more than 230,000 of them die each year from causes related to the disease. It is now the seventh-leading cause of death in the U.S. This November, National Diabetes Month, is the perfect time to do something about it.

Most of my patients have spent a lifetime eating diets rich in animal products loaded with saturated fat and cholesterol, which has left them overweight and suffering from the type-2 or “adult-onset” diabetes that afflicts 90 to 95 percent of diabetics. This form of diabetes usually appears after age 40—think Paula Deen and Aretha Franklin—although it is increasingly being found in younger adults (e.g., Ruben Studdard) and even teens and young children. It is often linked to obesity and inactivity, but even seemingly fit people, such as Tom Hanks, can develop it.

Diabetes can cause heart disease, strokes, blindness, kidney failure and pneumonia. It also leads to nerve damage and poor circulation in the feet and legs, which is where I come in. Limited blood flow makes it hard for sores and infections to heal and can ultimately lead to amputation of a toe, foot or leg. More than 65,000 people have diabetes-related leg and foot amputations each year. Sixty percent of all lower-limb amputations not resulting from trauma occur in people with diabetes. Most diabetic amputees don’t live long—the majority of my patients are dead within nine years of their first amputation.

So how can you stay on your feet and out of my office? Easy: Eat a low-fat, high-fiber, plant-based diet. Recent studies indicate that fat impairs insulin’s ability to function and that blood-sugar levels are under better control when people eat diets that are high in fiber and low in fat.

A study led by Dr. Neal Barnard, author of Dr. Neal Barnard’s Program for Reversing Diabetes: The Scientifically Proven System for Reversing Diabetes Without Drugs, showed that 43 percent of diabetics on a low-fat vegan diet were able to cut back on their medications, compared to only 26 percent of those who followed the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association. A Harvard School of Public Health study suggests that eating red meat and processed meats can increase a person’s risk for type-2 diabetes by as much as 50 percent.

Dr. Barnard encourages diabetics to eat low-fat plant-based foods with a low glycemic index, such as beans, peas, lentils, sweet potatoes, spinach, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes, carrots, brown rice, barley, quinoa, whole-grain pasta, bananas, apples, peaches, berries and citrus fruits. He also advises people to avoid added vegetable oils and other high-fat foods as well as refined sugar and flour.

Dietary changes alone can help cut back on the amount of insulin needed—or eliminate it altogether in some cases—and minimize complications. I’ve seen the “complications” of diabetes firsthand, and I want to keep my legs—which is why I’m a vegetarian.

Gifts for pets … and a song

By Deb Young
Sixty-two percent of U.S. households have pets, according to a 2011 survey by the American Pet Products Association. Many of these furry friends also will get a little something extra under the tree this holiday season.
All though they may not be able to unwrap presents with their paws,something special is guaranteed to earn you extra kisses and snuggles.
No matter the dog breed, these dog gift ideas are always a hit.
The basic idea: choose something that benefits the dog and the dog owner. Because happy dogs make happy owners (and vice versa).
Some gift ideas:
1. No pull Harnesses, If you have a dog that likes to pull on walks, it might be time to try . Theyare favorites of professional dog trainers around the world.
Your walks will be more enjoyable and in turn, you’ll probably end up walking your dog more often.
2. Doggles , Protective eyewear for dogs ,Whether he’s riding on the back of a bike or in a boat, make sure Rover’s eyes are properly protected.
3. Kongs are great for mental stimulation , Remember, don’t make it too hard for dogs who are soft. Keep the stuffing to their levels, or they will get frustrated and not try.
4. Clothes for dogs,  If you are still on the fence, consider this: Sure, dogs come equipped with their own external layering system, but some dogs have lighter layers of fur than others, and some are not genetically suited to the environments in which they find themselves transplanted. So your dog may in fact be extremely uncomfortable with the winter temperatures , as uncomfortable as you would be if you went outside without clothing.
5. Home made treats, The fact is, dog treats can be expensive. Plus, the ingredients in them aren’t always best for your dog. Commercial dog treats can have preservatives, food coloring and other things that you may not want your dog to eat.

That being the case, making your own homemade dog treats can be one of the best ways to not only be sure of what you are feeding your dog, but it can actually save you money too. Thousands of recipes can be found online.

For felines..
1. Thermal cat cushion, this is a comfy, cozy place for your cat to sleep. As kitty curls up in it, the cushion is warmed by his own body heat.
2. Expandable Cat Tunnel, Cats love to play and this multi-colored tunnel is great for hide and seek.
3. Feline “Greenies” , nothing is better or easier in promoting good dental care. These are textured treats that will also help scrape away tarter and cats love them.
4. Cat Cottage,This is top of the line! A 2-story decorated cottage, extra strong, accommodating cats up to 20 pounds. Includes two top floor lookouts, four hide and seek windows and two bottom level entry doors.
5. Laser light, You can get one at Wal-Mart, Petco, or probably any store that sells cat toys and supplies for under $10. This is a good way to engage your cat in interactive play with you.

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And for 2013 … try to eat way less meat … or go veggie! A song by one of our fave vegetarians (you thought we were gonna pick Paul McCartney, didn’t you?) Click on link below. – R. Tirella

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xL5spALs-eA

Go veggie to beat breast cancer! Doctor’s orders!

By Heather Moore

Now that National Breast Cancer Awareness Month has begun, many doctors and nutritionists are dishing out dietary advice to help women ward off the deadly disease. After reviewing the latest research, responsible medical experts, including those with the American Cancer Society and New York’s Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care, have come to a consensus: Women should eat a plant-based diet rich in phytochemicals, which fight inflammation and knock out carcinogens. This invaluable advice should shift our focus from wearing pink to eating green—in other words, to eating wholesome vegan foods.

While fruits, vegetables, beans, grains and soy foods contain cancer-fighting phytochemicals, all that animal-based foods have to offer are cholesterol and cancer-causing substances, including concentrated protein, hormones and saturated fat. As many as one-third of common types of cancer, including breast cancer, are linked to excess weight and inactivity, and it’s much easier to maintain a healthy weight if you eat vegan foods. They tend to be low in fat and calories, unlike fatty animal-based foods, such as hamburgers, chicken and cheese. Studies even show that vegans are nine times less likely to be obese than meat-eaters and that vegans are about 40 percent less likely to get cancer than nonvegans. Perhaps it’s no coincidence that October is also World Vegetarian Awareness Month.

A Washington State University professor recently identified more than 40 plant-based compounds that help slow the progression of cancer. His findings, which are published in the journal Cancer and Metastasis Reviews, support the claim that people who eat a plant-based diet are less likely to get cancer.

High-fat animal-based foods raise estrogen levels, accelerating the growth of cancer cells. In contrast, plant-based foods tend to keep estrogen at a safe level. Researchers with Boston University tracked more than 50,000 African-American women for 12 years—1,300 of them developed breast cancer, and 35 percent of the cases were estrogen receptor-negative, a highly aggressive form of the disease. The women who ate at least two servings of vegetables a day were 43 percent less likely to develop highly aggressive breast cancer than those who ate less than four servings of vegetables per week. Women who eat carrots and cruciferous vegetables, in particular, seem to have a reduced risk of breast cancer.

The lead researcher noted that high vegetable consumption offers significant health benefits, including protection against cancer. This conclusion is hardly an earth-shattering revelation, but it should give both men and women some food for thought. People who are concerned about cancer—or heart disease, diabetes and other health conditions—would be wise to choose vegan foods.

Another study, conducted by the University of Utah, found that women who eat healthy “native” Mexican foods, including beans, spices and tomato-based sauces, have a 32 percent lower risk of breast cancer than women who eat a typical Western-style diet, which is heavy in meat and cheese.

Dr. T. Colin Campbell, who stars in the acclaimed documentary Forks Over Knives, says that “no chemical carcinogen is nearly so important in causing human cancer as animal protein.” He urges people to eat vegan meals in order to prevent cancer and other common diseases. More doctors should follow his example. While many physicians can perform mastectomies, administer chemotherapy and offer other important medical services, the ones who give patients preventive dietary advice will ultimately be the real lifesavers.

Fight cancer with food

By Jonny Imerman

This week is Men’s Health Week — a good time for men of all ages to kick-start healthy habits. In my 20s, I survived two bouts of testicular cancer. Since that time, I’ve helped create a one-on-one cancer support organization, Imerman Angels, that connects someone fighting cancer with a person who’s been in the same shoes and survived. It gives me so much joy to give back. However, for years my own body didn’t feel its best. Last year, I went vegan, and I’ve never felt better.

I’m not here to lecture. I ate meat and dairy products for years, so who am I to judge? We cancer survivors should never judge regardless; we’re happy just to be here still. But I hope that by hearing about my experience, you’ll feel a little more empowered to take your health into your own hands.

One of the turning points that helped me decide to go vegan was listening to leukemia researcher Dr. Rosane Oliveira—herself a vegan—from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign speak about how dietary changes can help people lead healthier lives. I learned that research has linked the standard American diet—full of cholesterol and saturated fats—with serious illnesses, including cancer, while vegetarians have been shown to have a much lower cancer risk.

Animal proteins and saturated fats found in meat promote the growth of cancer cells and increase our risk for certain types of cancer. Cornell professor T. Colin Campbell’s China Study concluded that proteins from animal foods are the most cancer-causing substances ingested by humans. The study also found that casein, the primary protein in cow’s milk, “turns on” the growth of cancer cells. A link has even been discovered between dairy products and testicular cancer, which makes me even more confident in my decision to dump dairy.

Vegan foods, in contrast, help fight cancer. A study of men diagnosed with prostate cancer found that a diet rich in plant foods can slow or even halt the progression of the disease. Dark, leafy veggies like spinach and kale and fruits like blueberries are loaded with cancer-fighting antioxidants, and beans, whole grains, and other fiber-rich foods help rid your body of excess hormones that can contribute to cancer growth.

Vegan eating has other benefits, too. Following my treatment, I felt so tired and beaten down—my immune system was rattled. Now, even though I regularly meet and shake the hands of many people, I haven’t been sick once (and for people with cancer, an immune system boost can make all the difference). I feel great, I’m strong in the gym and my energy levels are high.

I also love animals, and it feels good knowing that the food I’m eating doesn’t contribute to their suffering. Another turning point for me was watching the video that Sir Paul McCartney narrated for PETA, “Glass Walls,” which includes undercover video footage showing how animals are slaughtered, suffering and in pain. There seems to be a great synergy between cancer survivors, who value their lives and health so highly because they are lucky to be alive, and people who choose to eat compassionate and healthy vegan foods.

You don’t have to take my word for it about the advantages of eating vegan, though. Try it for yourself. Healthy vegan foods provide all the nutrients that we need, so there’s nothing to lose and plenty to gain.

Yes, meat will kill you

By Paula Moore

Red meat in the morning, diners take warning. Red meat at night — nope, that’ll kill ya too.

As if anyone needed another reason to eat their veggies, here’s one: According to a new Harvard School of Public Health study, eating red meat increases your risk of early death. OK, here’s one more: Dr. Margaret Chan, the director general of the World Health Organization, recently warned that antibiotic resistance could bring about “the end of modern medicine as we know it.” In other words, if the hamburgers don’t kill you, the superbugs spawned on factory farms will.

Unless you want to eat yourself into an early grave, maybe it’s time to go vegan.

After analyzing nearly 30 years of data collected from 121,000 participants, the Harvard researchers found that people who regularly eat red meat are significantly more likely to die prematurely from multiple causes, including heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

The saturated fat in beef, pork and lamb; the nitrites found in processed meats; and the carcinogens that form when meat is cooked at high temperatures all make red meat a health hazard.

How bad is it? According to the Harvard study, eating just one serving of unprocessed red meat (such as hamburger or roast beef) per day increases your risk of early death by 13 percent. One serving is about the size of a deck of cards. Hot dogs, bacon and other processed meats are especially dangerous. One daily serving of processed red meat increases your risk of premature death by 20 percent.

Chicken and fish aren’t so hot, either, so simply replacing red meat with other animal foods isn’t the answer. Even at its leanest—white meat, no skin—chicken gets nearly one-quarter of its calories from fat, much of it the bad kind (saturated). Many types of fish are surprisingly high in saturated fat as well. Fifty-five percent of the calories in salmon come from fat; for swordfish, that figure is 30 percent. In both cases, about 25 percent of the fat is saturated.

In an editorial accompanying the Harvard study, Dr. Dean Ornish (the man who persuaded Bill Clinton to go vegan) reminds us that what’s bad for our health is also bad for the planet. Raising animals for food is a leading contributor to climate change and wastes precious resources. Almost half of the world’s population is malnourished, yet 40 percent of the world’s grain is fed to livestock, not to people.

And remember those superbugs mentioned earlier? Farmed animals are fed a steady diet of drugs—including 80 percent of the antibiotics used in the U.S.—to fatten them up and keep them alive in unsanitary, stressful conditions that would otherwise kill them. As a result, factory farms are breeding grounds for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

So how can we keep from slowly killing ourselves and Mother Earth every time we sit down to dinner? According to the Harvard researchers, eating plant-based foods such as nuts, beans and whole grains instead of red meat can significantly lower our risk of dying young. Replace one serving of red meat with one serving of whole grains, for example, and the risk drops 14 percent.

“Plant-based foods are rich in phytochemicals, bioflavonoids, and other substances that are protective,” explains Dr. Ornish. “In other words, what we include in our diet is as important as what we exclude, so substituting healthier foods for red meat provides a double benefit to our health.”

Eating vegan foods also reduces your carbon footprint. To feel better, live longer and help protect the planet, trading in your burgers for black beans would be a good place to start.

Study: yes, meat will kill you

By Paula Moore

Red meat in the morning, diners take warning. Red meat at night — nope, that’ll kill ya, too.

As if anyone needed another reason to eat their veggies, here’s one: According to a new Harvard School of Public Health study, eating red meat increases your risk of early death. OK, here’s one more: Dr. Margaret Chan, the director general of the World Health Organization, recently warned that antibiotic resistance could bring about “the end of modern medicine as we know it.” In other words, if the hamburgers don’t kill you, the superbugs spawned on factory farms will.

Unless you want to eat yourself into an early grave, maybe it’s time to go vegan.

After analyzing nearly 30 years of data collected from 121,000 participants, the Harvard researchers found that people who regularly eat red meat are significantly more likely to die prematurely from multiple causes, including heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

The saturated fat in beef, pork and lamb; the nitrites found in processed meats; and the carcinogens that form when meat is cooked at high temperatures all make red meat a health hazard.

How bad is it? According to the Harvard study, eating just one serving of unprocessed red meat (such as hamburger or roast beef) per day increases your risk of early death by 13 percent. One serving is about the size of a deck of cards. Hot dogs, bacon and other processed meats are especially dangerous. One daily serving of processed red meat increases your risk of premature death by 20 percent.

Chicken and fish aren’t so hot, either, so simply replacing red meat with other animal foods isn’t the answer. Even at its leanest—white meat, no skin—chicken gets nearly one-quarter of its calories from fat, much of it the bad kind (saturated). Many types of fish are surprisingly high in saturated fat as well. Fifty-five percent of the calories in salmon come from fat; for swordfish, that figure is 30 percent. In both cases, about 25 percent of the fat is saturated.

In an editorial accompanying the Harvard study, Dr. Dean Ornish (the man who persuaded Bill Clinton to go vegan) reminds us that what’s bad for our health is also bad for the planet. Raising animals for food is a leading contributor to climate change and wastes precious resources. Almost half of the world’s population is malnourished, yet 40 percent of the world’s grain is fed to livestock, not to people.

And remember those superbugs mentioned earlier? Farmed animals are fed a steady diet of drugs—including 80 percent of the antibiotics used in the U.S.—to fatten them up and keep them alive in unsanitary, stressful conditions that would otherwise kill them. As a result, factory farms are breeding grounds for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

So how can we keep from slowly killing ourselves and Mother Earth every time we sit down to dinner? According to the Harvard researchers, eating plant-based foods such as nuts, beans and whole grains instead of red meat can significantly lower our risk of dying young. Replace one serving of red meat with one serving of whole grains, for example, and the risk drops 14 percent.

“Plant-based foods are rich in phytochemicals, bioflavonoids, and other substances that are protective,” explains Dr. Ornish. “In other words, what we include in our diet is as important as what we exclude, so substituting healthier foods for red meat provides a double benefit to our health.”

Eating vegan foods also reduces your carbon footprint. To feel better, live longer and help protect the planet, trading in your burgers for black beans would be a good place to start.

Mendon bird is runner-up in Turkey of the Year contest!

Dale the Turkey Is Among Top Rescued Fowl in Thanksgiving Competition

Mendon— Dale would have joined the millions of turkeys who become Thanksgiving dinner every year if Maple Farm Sanctuary hadn’t rescued him from a local turkey farm and given him a lifelong home. Now, the handsome, white-feathered Dale spends his time with his mate, Daphne, of whom he is very protective. Dale is vocal and friendly and loves to show off—so he’ll relish the attention that comes with being named the second runner-up in PETA’s first-ever Turkey of the Year contest for rescued birds. Starting this week, Dale will be among the rescued turkeys featured on PETA.org.

“Thanksgiving is murder on turkeys, but compassionate rescuers like Maple Farm Sanctuary give lucky birds like Dale something to be thankful for,” says PETA Vice President Daphna Nachminovitch. “Rescued turkeys have been given a second chance at a life free from suffering on crowded factory farms—and that’s the real prize.”

More than 250 million turkeys are killed in the U.S. every year—including more than 40 million for Thanksgiving dinners alone. In nature, turkeys are protective and loving parents as well as spirited explorers who can climb trees and run as fast as 25 miles per hour. But most turkeys slated to be killed for food are crammed into filthy warehouses, where disease, smothering, and heart attacks are common. Turkeys are drugged and bred to grow such unnaturally large upper bodies that their legs often become crippled under the weight.

The winner of PETA’s contest, Jake, lives in North Carolina. Dale’s fellow runner-up, Tomas, lives in Rhode Island.

“Meatless Mondays” for Worcester?

By Heather Moore

America just got a little bit greener. Earlier this month, Aspen, Colo. — John Denver’s “sweet Rocky Mountain paradise” — became the first city in the U.S. to launch a comprehensive Meatless Monday campaign. Local restaurants, schools, hospitals, charities and businesses, including the Aspen Valley Hospital, the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Aspen Elementary School, have signed on to promote plant-based meals on Mondays.

For our own health and the health of the planet, the rest of us should go meat-free as well—at least for one day a week.

According to Dawn Shepard, who is heading Aspen’s Meatless Monday campaign, Aspen is a very health-conscious community, and residents are also concerned about the environmental costs of meat production. A 2010 United Nations report revealed that meat and dairy products require more resources and cause higher greenhouse-gas emissions than do plant-based foods. Continue reading “Meatless Mondays” for Worcester?

Fight cancer with your fork!

By Bruce Friedrich

According to a new study, one of the deadliest types of cancer is also one of the most preventable. The World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research found that eating too much meat raises the risk of colorectal cancer and that eating fiber-rich vegetarian foods reduces the risk. What’s more, nearly half (45 percent) of colorectal cancer cases “could be prevented if we all ate more fiber-rich plant foods and less meat.”

This serves as yet another reminder that one of the best weapons in the war on cancer is a fork.

Scientists at Imperial College London conducted the new analysis as part of the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research’s groundbreaking Continuous Update Project (CUP). They found that a person who eats just 3.5 ounces of pork, beef or lamb every day has a 17 percent higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than does someone who eats no meat.

Three ounces of meat is approximately the size of a deck of cards. That’s just one serving size as determined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, yet it’s far less than most Americans ingest in one sitting, let alone in one day.

Just about any meat is loaded with the saturated fat that the American Cancer Society believes is linked to cancer of the colon and rectum, but processed meats such as ham, bacon, hot dogs and deli slices carry an even greater risk. According to the CUP report, if a person eats 3.5 ounces of processed meat every day, his or her risk for colorectal cancer increases by 36 percent. The more meat you eat, the higher your risk will be.

Almost as bad as what’s in meat is what’s not in it: fiber. Meat and dairy products have absolutely no fiber at all, while fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains are loaded with it. Fiber helps speed the passage of food through the colon. Meat, on the other hand, tends to hang around and, well, rot.

In my work with PETA, I’ve been researching and writing about vegetarian issues for more than 15 years. And the conclusion of each new nutritional study is nearly always the same. There is overwhelming evidence linking meat to some of our society’s most severe health problems. Conversely, eating vegetarian foods can greatly reduce your risk of developing many of these same diseases—and in some cases, actually reverse them.

For example, according to the American Dietetic Association, vegetarians have “lower rates of death from ischemic heart disease, lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and prostate and colon cancer” than meat-eaters do. The American Cancer Society recommends “choosing most of your foods from plant sources and limiting your intake of high-fat foods such as those from animal sources.”

If we take away anything from such nutritional research, it should be that the best prescription for good health is always prevention. And if making the sensible switch to a vegan diet can so greatly benefit our health—not to mention save animals’ lives—why not at least try it? With summer fast approaching, and with it a wealth of locally grown fruits and vegetables available in farmers’ markets and at produce stands, now is a great time to start eating for life.

Bruce Friedrich is a vice president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).