Worcester’s pups need a dog park!

Rosalie Tirella

InCity Times owner/editor/publisher Rosalie Tirella and her Husky mix Jett pose for a pic two and 1/2 years ago. Even though Rose walks Jett every day, Jett would love an enclosed space in which to run super fast! (That’s why he’s called “Jett”!) The bottom of McKeon Road in Quinsig Village would make a super dog park!

By Deb Young

Every dog has his day, but does he also need a park? I think so.

Let’s face it – although we are wonderful companions for our dogs, sometimes there’s nothing like a “hound’s day out.” Taking your dog to a dog park allows them to enjoy the company of other dogs while requiring them to mind their social manners.

A great playground for your pal, dog parks also offer you a way to makeover your dog and your town. Helping to create better behaved pets, a more pet-friendly city and shelters that can work more efficiently it’s time for this community to open a dog park.

For many people (particularly the elderly, singles and those with disabilities), the dogs really are their only companions. If they can go to a dog park, it gives them a reason to get dressed, go out, socialize, play with their dog, and strengthen that bond between them and their community. Dog parks provide the elderly and disabled owners with an accessible place to exercise their companions or get their animal fix. Also promoting physical fitness and improve the mental state of owners.

A dog park would provide opportunities for people to socialize and share valuable, responsible pet ownership information because of the common bond shared by dog owners. Dog parks can bring people together and create a greater sense of community. Dogs help shy people “break the ice”. It would also promote responsible pet ownership in our community because the park would require some form of licensing and proof of vaccinations before dogs would be allowed to use it. A dog park would help increase dog ownership registration in the town and may also make the local animal control’s job a little easier.

In increasing frequency, research has shown that more and more potential home-owners consider the availability of a dog park when considering moving to a community. A dog park increases the desirability of a community to potential newcomers.

A valuable benefit of a dog park is what is does for the dogs themselves. It gives them the space and freedom to run with other members of their species, all while being safely supervised. In order for dogs to be healthy and well socialized, they need time to exercise and play with other dogs. “A well-exercised (a.k.a. tired) dog is a happy, healthy, quiet dog and a better neighbor”

Well-socialized dogs are less likely to develop behavior problems such as aggression and excessive barking. An outdoor “club for canines” may help reduce associated neighborhood conflicts. Puppies and dogs that get enough exercise by playing are less likely to create a nuisance, bark excessively, destroy property, jump on passers-by, etc.

There are more than 700 dog parks in the United States, and overwhelmingly they work. Dog fights and dog bites happen, but are rare. A more pervasive problem is people not always picking up after their pet, but even that can be addressed with peer pressure and self-policing among park users.

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